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17

(My experience, for context: my girlfriend and I have ridden tandems quite a bit -- in the last 6 months we put in a few thousand touring miles on our tandem, and we've been riding tandems for several years now.) There are several factors to consider when deciding who's going to be the stoker (at the back) and who's going to be the captain (at the front): ...


13

Reliability True commuter bikes are built for day-in and day-out reliability. As far as breaking down, you have little to worry about as a commuter bike is designed to take massive amounts of abuse and neglect and still function. While you could have a part failure like any other bike, these are uncommon and the most frequent (the flat tire) is easily fixed. ...


11

Here's what I normally bring: Spare tube Tire levers (for changing the tube) Pump (or CO2 inflator) 4, 5, and 6mm allen wrenches (for adjusting/tightening the saddle or seat post during the ride, but also to tighten many other things on the bike that could come loose) To me, for the long rides that I do, everything beyond this basic equipment provides ...


11

I would argue that there is no limitation on distance the biggest limitation you will have will be on: Speed and Comfort over time. Speed Comfort bikes arn't made to go fast. They are designed to be ridden around in a leisurely way. Variables limiting speed include: Aerodynamics - you are sitting as upright as possible % of your speed/strength you ...


9

I know calorie counts vary quite a bit, but a rough ballpark for cycling at a 20 mph pace is 450 calories per 15 minutes according to this calorie calculator. Running a 6 minute mile is expected to burn a similar 450 calorie count on the same calculator with the same settings. So, if you do the math, and the calculator is assumed to be reasonably accurate, ...


9

Informally, I find that on long rides, your body will simply know what it needs. You pull off at a stop; the trail mix and pickles look delicious, so you eat them. More scientifically though, your body can process about two servings (e.g., bottles of gatorade, gel packs, etc.) of carbohydrate per hour. Any more than this, and you can experience ...


8

We can generalize the main areas where one can load weight as such: Front rack vs. Rear Rack High (on top of rack) vs. Low (in panniers) The most commonly accepted points for load distribution are as follows: Keep dense, heavy items low to the ground. The lower you & your bike's center of gravity is, the more easily you can keep yourself upright. ...


7

Bonking is normally caused by lack of food. I happen to be an expert at this (just bonked on a ride today, in fact). Treatment is easy: Stop Eat something -- even if you don't want to (which is often the case) Catch your breath and then continue at an easy pace When the calories hit your bloodstream, you'll start to feel better Sugary foods work ...


7

The best solution I've ever had for bonking is a cola. Full of pure sugary goodness and water plus caffeine. If seriously exhausted, five minutes off the bike lying down with your eyes closed can help you eke out more miles. The second best solution I've had is beer. Often times if I stop to have a beer or two I don't even mind that I'm not continuing to ...


6

Having a strong core is crucial to being comfortable. In addition to riding 4 days a week I whitewater kayak a few nights a week. The twisting done in that sport helps keep your core strong as well as working the arms. I'd suggest that yoga, and pilates are good core/flexibility workouts that you should look into to get your core strong. Long ride saddle ...


6

Personally for me, the key ingredient (after raw calories) is salt. I find on my Ironman distance races that I go hyponatremic pretty early. I just get salt packets from a restaurant and eat a packet (5 grams) every hour or so. When I realize I am low on salt (usually feel like I am falling asleep while biking hard or running) I eat some salt, and as ...


5

Your bike will most probably be fine - there's nothing inherently different to riding 50-100k as opposed to 30k, assuming all the components are in good condition (which since you've had it serviced, should be true). Obviously check the brakes, oil the chain, and check the tyres (nothing lodged in them, pumped up to the right pressure) before heading out. ...


5

Your approach to building up distance is a great tried-and-true method. I do a fair number of long distance (200-600km) rides but don't currently do any type of cross training. Like yourself, I started out with shorter distances and gradually built up to longer and longer rides. With more and more time on the bike, you will start to notice all of those ...


5

I have the same bike, and have done a little loaded touring (though not recently, as my health no longer permits it). I find that keeping the load low and balanced is the key. On the front it's important that the load be tightly attached, since if it is loose at all it will tend to wobble and resonate and can make the bike unmanageable on a rough surface. ...


4

i might be a wee bit excessive but just for everyday commuting i carry: patch kit spare tube x2 hand pump foldable tire multitool pocketknife first aid kit chaintool tire lever x2 allen keys dumbbell wrench also this is the greatest cycling wrench ever ...


4

As wdy mentioned, it is quality over quantity especially in your case. http://www.freewebs.com/velodynamics2/traininglevels.pdf http://home.trainingpeaks.com/articles/cycling/power-training-levels,-by-andrew-coggan.aspx Imo increasing your mitochondrial and capillary density are two important items for any type of endurance cycling. As you can see from ...


4

Here's what usually I'll bring on commuting more than 50km: tire patching kit (tire lever, patch kit) spare tube (actually it goes first, if its get another failure, the i'll go with the patch kit) multi-tool (never hurt for me to add few ounce to more than allen key) human repair kit (aka. first aid kit), you'll never know what happens next additional ...


4

OK: Muscles (and the rest of the body) need energy. That energy can come from several sources -- both stored and swallowed. The blood and other body fluids contain enough blood sugar (glucose) to power the muscles for something like 15-30 minutes -- a relatively short time. After that blood sugar will begin to drop and the muscles must draw on other ...


4

I've done a couple 70 kilometer rides on my hybrid (what you might call a commuter) bike. It's mostly about being in good enough shape and not about the bike. In the rides I was on, people rode all kinds of bikes from carbon road bikes, to mountain bikes, to recumbents, to long tails, to fixies. Like others have said, make sure you bring enough food and a ...


4

It's totally reasonable to ride such distances (and even much longer) on a Navigator. I have a 2003 Navigator back in Poland. It was my "return to cycling as an adult" bike. I've done many 30+ mile rides on it in rolling terrain. I don't think it would be much fun on a super hilly ride (due mostly to the bike's heft) but even that is doable. As people have ...


4

The real key for cycling sunblock is to not put it on your forehead, or wear some kind of bandana to block the sweat from getting in your eyes. Or wear a cycling hat under your helmet to protect your head from sunburn. I spray the sunscreen on the bottom half of my face, ears, neck etc. then use some additional cream/stick on my nose for added protection. ...


4

I'm a pasty white guy in the antipodes, and I burn like a sausage on flaming barbeque. I much prefer cloth-based sunscreen. That adds cooling as well as sun protection, and doesn't leave a greasy residue that has to be washed off. Getting sunscreen to stay on areas that are hot, sweaty and being rubbed is not easy and rarely effective. My preference is not ...


4

For significant climbs, the VAM ( french? for meters climbed per hour ) is all you need to know. If you know your VAM and the height of the climb, then that's how long the climb will take. Road or MTB, it doesn't vary much in my experience unless the trail requires significant hike-a-bike. Walking speeds just don't vary that much so Naismith's rule ...


3

I have a friend who is a stairmaster / row machine addict in the off season when there isn't enought light to ride before/after work. He never slows or weakens even though he may spend up to 4 months off the bike during winter. As for me, I have an indoor trainer and up the resistance along with doing intervals when I can't go out. An half hour to ...


3

Find a really big hill in your neighbourhood and on your 20 Mile rides do say a 5 mile warm up and then do seated climbs all the way up, rest on the way down, and repeat till you run out of time and ride home. Don't climb out of the saddle, make it a seated climb, and you will build strength all over as needed that is of great value in riding. You will ...


3

Have you considered a trailer? This also allows local unloaded trips from a base without all the gear loaded. Keeps weight down low too.


3

As long as the bike and you are properly prepared for the trip you should be fine.People have been riding for 100km rides long before they made lightweight, multigear,Hi-Tech bikes.The only difference beteen doing it on a commuter is it might take you longer,you might tire more easily,and you might not be as comfortable as you would on a performance road ...


3

I can recall, a few decades past, some riders who did a week-long, 80-mile-per-day ride on Huffys. And they were self-contained (carrying all their own baggage in panniers). (The Huffy is the prototypical department-store bike in the US, and these bikes were not known for high quality or light weight.) The Huffy riders appeared to survive, probably better ...



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