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14

By this do you mean pedalling when unnecessary (and without increasing the bike's speed), for example, on descents? I will do this on long descents just to keep my legs turning over and to prevent them getting too cold. But I will mix it with coasting. There is a theory that keeping the legs moving will keep your blood flowing and help pump lactic acid ...


11

The main thing you have to consider at speed is drag: The force F on you+bike (mass m) is: F = ma = mg sin Q - F_d - F_rr where a is your acceleration, g is the acceleration due to gravity and Q is the hill angle to the horizontal. F_d is the drag force which doesn't scale with mass. Try dropping a balloon and a (soccer) football of the same size and ...


9

The differences are quite significant from race to race - each track is different. Also events such as Rampage are not too much about speed. The top speed may vary between 55-65km/h on tracks such as Mount Sainte Anne up to around 80km/h in Pietermaritzburg which is known for high speeds achieved. Of course all assuming good weather. Also these speeds are ...


9

Focusing on the strava bit - its a screwed up strava track. The track shows they flew, and strava's point-grabbing routines have gone wonky. Short answer they did not do it in 11 seconds. They are bike rides though - just a fortuitous error on the GPS signal makes it look like they were faster, and much more direct. I suspect there's some obstructions in ...


7

In addition to the response provided by PeteH, I use "soft pedaling" when coasting to a stop on my downtube shifter/derailleur-equipped road bike in order to change gears before a stop. Some bikes (such as those with internal hubs) do not need any chain motion to shift gears, but my bike does. That's the only concrete reason why I would employ this ...


6

Whenever I go somewhere new on my bike, I like to check Strava's Global Heatmap. You can easily see the routes that are most common and if you drag the little yellow fella down onto a road you can see what the road is like too. This is most useful for finding nice roads that a lot of people ride, for major climbs, look for a segment marked HC in the ...


5

Looking at the component specs, its an entry level MTB, one better than a BSO. 80% of mountain biking is about the rider and his skills, not the bike. Shops won't tell you this, as telling you your riding skills matter most does not end in a sale of a newer season/more expensive bike. Cashed up middle aged execs won't either - many just want you to see ...


5

A lot depends on what you mean by "trail/downhill" and by "work". It wasn't that long ago that a full squish 100mm fork bike was a full on downhill machine. However, the big drawback to that bike as a descender is the relatively steep head angles. Putting a bigger fork will help with that, but it won't help with the issue of how robust the parts are ...


5

Having done both, I'd say they are about equally dangerous with the edge going to downhill biking. It's easier to gain momentum on a downhill bike and harder to properly lose it. Additionally equipment failure is a bigger concern and generally more catastrophic. Downhill biking in the winter pads the ground (like skiing) but, during all seasons, trees ...


5

There is no easy and free solution for this, since your bike is not meant to be going downhill. The best thing you can do is go downhill using the largest front chainring and a pretty large rear cog (but not the largest). This will ensure a pretty good rear derailleur tension which will most probably prevent the chain fall. If you are willing to spend ...


5

It's really simple, gravity/weight moves you forward, and drag/friction keeps you from going fast. He can't do much about the weight difference, short of drinking more beer or getting a heavier bike. But drag and friction is a different story. There are many things slowing you and your buddy down, the largest factor being wind resistance. Wind resistance ...


4

The reason for locking suspension uphill is efficiency converting the power you produce into forward momentum. If you are losing forward momentum by slipping, its because you have too much power going to the rear wheel. This needs to only be for a very short (instantaneous) burst. Once traction is lost, it takes a lot to regain it. Give this, there is no ...


4

I should think that they only work in conjunction with a full face helmet in that the helmet's angular motion range (up, down, left/right tilt) is restricted in such a way that on crashing, the typical "break-neck" motion (sharp snap of the neck) is avoided. However, this is just an educated guess.


4

Short answer: they're not required to. According to http://www.spkids.com/pages/astm-helmet-safety-standards-explained this standard consists of these tests: Dropped from two meters on flat anvil (iron block); drops from curbstone and hemispheric anvils placed higher than bicycle helmet testing Three anvils mimic various mountain bike terrains for ...


3

Back in college, I did some downhilll racing at a ski resort with chairs like the ones you're talking about. One guy carried his bike like this: It had the advantage that when he dismounted, he just set the rear wheel down while still sitting in the chair, stood up, and walked off the lift with the bike next to him. The disadvantage was that it was an ...


3

Am I correct in thinking (based on your PinkBike comment) that you've never personally participated in a DH race? I would very highly recommend you compete in a few before trying to put on one of your own. There's a ton of things you'll need to think about, and the best way to get a good list is by attending one yourself and looking around with a ...


3

The pros you see on the videos set their saddle depending on the DH course. If the course has a lot of possibilities for pedalling and not many drops - set it high, so on flat sections they can rest their bum on the seat and give it a full pedalling power. If the course is rough and steep - no racer will have the seat high. So you should do. You know what ...


3

Gummier tires (that won't last as long) have superior traction. As far as I am aware, that is the only advantage the KOM may have over you. On dry pavement, slicks have more grip than tires with treads, so your tires being "fairly slick" is not a bad thing. The fact that your time is almost double that of the KOM (that is a massive difference, even if he ...


3

Clipless makes it hard to bail out when you're in trouble, which is why most DH riders use flats. A quality pair of flats + decent shoes are going to be just as expensive as clipless pedals and shoes. Unless you're doing serious downhill (and crashing a good bit), I would go straight to clipless.


2

This may be half-remembered physics coming into play here, but I've raced (substantially heavier) friends down hills where they've been on bikes which should - be all accounts - be slower than my own, yet they've won. Could momentum come into play over rougher terrain? By that, I mean if a rider carrying a heavier weight were to hit a bump, or hole etc, they ...


2

These days we have Strava for this. Check for example (Strava account required to see details of individual rides): Mont ventoux descent. Galibier descent Alpe d'Huez descent You'll find some segments there, and quite often you also get tracks from pro cyclists. From looking at just a few KOMS I see that top speeds at about 110-120 km/h are not uncommon. ...


2

You can replace the pads (as stated elsewhere). There are a lot of variations in pad material, and a faster-wearing pad is not necessarily a better braking pad. Unfortunately, it's hard to find a good selection of pads, and even harder to get good info on which is suitable to which conditions. You can use your rear brake more, especially for speed ...


2

No reason at all. NWD10 is a classic old school movie. You don't see purposeless skidding like that in today's MTB movies nor do you see it in real life MTB riding. Kirt Voreis (the guy in that scene - legendary rider) is probably doing this for no reason, just for fun, or at least what used to be fun in these old times.


2

I have done this only once, but have observed a lot of people carrying bikes like this. The lift in question is just as in your picture - 2-person open lift with safety. The chairs slow somewhat while in the station, but mostly hit you in the butt. So there are two things you need to do, and the results are both easy and safe. Furthermore, both seats can be ...


2

You need to measure your chain for stretch, it may be too stretched and no longer meshing with the gears properly. There are tools for this or you can do it with a ruler--one foot of ruler should exactly match the distance between pins on the chain; if the pins are not lining up with the marks on the ruler it may be time to replace. If you do replace the ...


2

Is this a trick question? Your map shows Car Canyon Road heading out to the botton-right. That's 8 miles /12 km long and rises 2500 feet or 800 metres. And there are 9 hairpin bends, just to keep you alert. Here's a strava route https://www.strava.com/routes/3724007 Here's a segment, showing 39 people have done it already, with a best time of 44 ...


2

Another point to consider - confidence. I had a washout on a road, which lead to a slide on a downhill ~4 months ago, which ended up off the road and down a hill. I am now much more leery of turns at speed, to the point I brake down to a slow speed and coast through any leaning part of the curve, only applying pedals again when exiting the corner. So, ...



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