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13

By this do you mean pedalling when unnecessary (and without increasing the bike's speed), for example, on descents? I will do this on long descents just to keep my legs turning over and to prevent them getting too cold. But I will mix it with coasting. There is a theory that keeping the legs moving will keep your blood flowing and help pump lactic acid ...


7

In addition to the response provided by PeteH, I use "soft pedaling" when coasting to a stop on my downtube shifter/derailleur-equipped road bike in order to change gears before a stop. Some bikes (such as those with internal hubs) do not need any chain motion to shift gears, but my bike does. That's the only concrete reason why I would employ this ...


5

A lot depends on what you mean by "trail/downhill" and by "work". It wasn't that long ago that a full squish 100mm fork bike was a full on downhill machine. However, the big drawback to that bike as a descender is the relatively steep head angles. Putting a bigger fork will help with that, but it won't help with the issue of how robust the parts are ...


4

The reason for locking suspension uphill is efficiency converting the power you produce into forward momentum. If you are losing forward momentum by slipping, its because you have too much power going to the rear wheel. This needs to only be for a very short (instantaneous) burst. Once traction is lost, it takes a lot to regain it. Give this, there is no ...


3

The pros you see on the videos set their saddle depending on the DH course. If the course has a lot of possibilities for pedalling and not many drops - set it high, so on flat sections they can rest their bum on the seat and give it a full pedalling power. If the course is rough and steep - no racer will have the seat high. So you should do. You know what ...


1

If you're banging the boys against the seat even when it's low, it's the result of poor technique. The pros are using a of proper technique in conjunction with their suspension. Unfortunately, it's very difficult to learn proper technique riding a full suspension bicycle. The suspension does the work that proper technique should be doing and you just never ...


1

I would not worry about it. I run my shocks with ProPedal on most of the time, and something else has always broken well before the rear shock gave out. You're not going to do any extra harm to the shock just because you ran it down a descent with ProPedal on. You should be more worried about bottoming the shock out or not keeping it properly serviced.


1

While shocks are certainly meant to be locked out and ridden, even over semi-rough terrain, there are probably some limits to the design. I'm not a fork/shock mechanic, but what I know about fluid dynamics tells me that you shouldn't do this too often! When you lock out your fork/shock it limits that compression of the fluids inside or prevents compression ...


1

Although I'm sure it's not the same, in MTB I use a very brief lapse of smooth pedalling while downshifting in a difficult ascent, it helps reducing noise and wear in the gearset. I accelerate a little before the shift, then, as I actuate the shifter I pedal without load relying on inertia. When I feel the new gear is fully engaged I resume normal pedalling. ...


1

I have often heard, and I agree, that the "muscular pump" is partly responsible for higher blood flow to specific muscle regions during activity. The reason is that between muscular contractions the difference in pressure is such as to draw blood from the arterial side to the venous side. It is a hypothesis and has not been conclusively proved. That may be ...



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