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6

I expect that after 10,000 km your chainring also needs to be replaced (frankly, I find it astonishing that you made it that far without replacing anything else. That's amazing.). Am I correct in guessing that you spend most of your time in your middle chainring? If so, it will be significantly more worn than your large or small rings, which would explain ...


5

Cogs and chains "wear together" (regardless of whether they are front rings or rear sprockets). The old chain does not slip on the ring, because the old chain's rollers are worn down. They have an overall smaller diameter than the rollers of a new chain, and also a different shape: new rollers are cylinders, but worn ones look like small pulleys, they have ...


2

Yes a new chain can skip in either an old chain ring or old cassette. The length between chain lengths needs to match. So the old chain matched up to the old ring. The new chain does not match up with the old chain ring. I suspect the middle chain ring looks worn. If so for sure time to replace it. What do I need to know to buy new chainrings for ...


1

I wouldn't expect to throw the chain inwards or outwards (at least on my 3x8 setup) if the limit screws are correct. This is true whatever sprocket I'm using and even if I push the lever the wrong way (it's not unknown when I'm tired especially if I've recently been riding another bike). That said you shouldn't be shifting like that as you acknowledge. ...


1

The chain will typically slip under the following conditions: 1. the chain is worn out (this can be measured with a cheap tool, or by your LBS). 2. the cassette is worn out 3. one or more of the chainrings (the cogs on the crankset) is worn out 4. the chain and/or cassette/cogs/pulley wheel are dirty and full of oil/road-grit/gunk. These can occur ...



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