Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

36

Do you hear a "tick" sound every time you spin the wheel anti-clockwise? that's the freewheel mechanism composed by two small parts called "pawls" and when you spin it on that direction, those pawls turn loosely until they find the "dent" in the inner mechanism (the ratchet body), that's when the "tick" sound happens. When you ride your bike, those two ...


24

The first rule is make sure the rear derailleur is adjusted correctly before adjusting the front derailleur. There are three adjustments that you can do on the front derailleur: Clamp Position Low limit stop High limit stop Clamp Position Here you can adjust the height of the derailleur, normally this is recommended as a 2mm clearance between the ...


20

It's likely a matter of convention, dating back to the first "safety bicycles" introduced in the 19th century. Drivetrains are on the right today because that's what bicycle builders decided to do in the late 1800s. As to why they originally decided to put drivetrains on the right, it's probably because rear cogs used to be screwed on (some still are). ...


13

I don't have an internal hub, but I want one for the following reasons: They are sealed and protected from the elements. They are nice for commuting because you can shift them while stopped... If you've ever stopped at a red light on a normal bike and struggled to get going again because of your gear, you can appreciate this. With an Internal hub, you can ...


11

Yeah. A modern double chainring is ramped and pinned, in order to be more easily shifted from one ring to the next. Simply put, the chainring "wants" to pass off the chain to the next cog. Without a derailleur to keep it in place, the lateral pull of the chain shifting across the rear, combined with some road jostling, can make the chain fall off the front. ...


10

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


10

This would never work due to fact that no force would be transmitted to the rear wheel until the derailleur cage was at maximum extension. The derailleur has to be below the chainstay to allow it to take up the slack in the chain. I suppose you could split the derailleur into to parts, one to keep the chain tension and the other to change gears, but that ...


10

The derailleur needs to guide the chain into the sprocket - which means it goes on the bottom. The tension pulley needs to go on the slack side of the chain - which again means it goes on the bottom (the top side of the chain loop has the drive tension). If the drive train was reversed, you could do it. Put the drive wheel in front and steer with your butt ...


9

A stretched chain will wear out gears (especially the rear cassette). You can see when this because the teeth get worn away to points - it's very obvious. But it's very unlikely you wore out a chain and gears in 1000 Km. What is more likely is that the cable has stretched slight from new and the derailuer is out of adjustment so it is putting the chain ...


9

There are a number of reasons that the shifting on your rear derailleur is not working well: The derailleur hanger (the bit of the frame that the derailleur bolts onto) could be bent. To check this look at the angle that the derailleur cage is at. When viewed from behind, it should be vertical, when viewed from above, it should be parallel to the ...


9

Answer: No you don't need a new hub. However, you will probably need to put a small (~1mm) spacer at the back of the cassette, otherwise you won't be able to tighten the whole cassette down. Also be aware that prolonged use of a 10-speed cassette on an 8/9-speed freehub body will cause dents to form in the freehub body (because the 10-speed cogs are so ...


9

The excess oil collects grit from the road, which acts as an abrasive that will wear out the chain.


9

http://www.landriderbikes.com They were very heavily advertised several years ago but currently they seem to show up more on craigslist than on TV.


8

Drivetrain components tend to wear in this order: Chain Rear cassette/sprockets Front chainrings (and the teeth on your derailleur's jockey wheels may last, but the bearings may not) The chain is usually the culprit for wearing out the other two. As it wears, the distance between links effectively increases, and the mismatch between the links and teeth ...


8

The skipping will always be because of the chain touching on the other cogs, or trying to slip back down from the pull of the rear derailleur. The chain is too wide and, as you already know, is doing one or the other. It might not be evident from looking at the cogs while riding as the chain is fed from underneath when you pedal, so the clicking from the ...


8

It's much better to open the chain. Derailleurs are not really designed to be opened repeatedly, and doing so inexpertly can potentially ruin the derailleur. Chains might have either a lock link or a master link of some kind, find that open the chain and then thread the chain through the derailleur. If the chain does not have one of these links, you will ...


8

The entire assembly is called the crankset. The ring with the teeth is called the chainring. The crankset consists of the crank arm, the spider and the chainrings. The chainrings bolt onto the spider which is the multi-armed piece connected to the crank arm. The right crank arm and spider are often one piece. Lower-end cranksets are forged or riveted ...


8

From personal experience, having just changed to a cassette with less range, I have to say that smaller steps definitely offers some advantage. I went from an 8-speed 11-32 to a 12-23. Having a single tooth of difference between adjacent gears means that it's more likely that you will be in the "right gear". The "right gear" is the gear in which you aren't ...


8

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


7

Neil is right, most all "auto shifting" or "ghost shifting" is the result of cable-tension problems. If the cable is a bit loose, the derailleur will try to shift "up" to a smaller cog. If too tight, it will try to catch the next larger cog. Cables stretch, especially after a short period where the new cables stretch to the point they're stable. after ...


7

Assuming the hub is a freehub design (the freewheel mechanism is in a splined body onto which the cassette (sprockets) fit), no. 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes are all the same width. See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html#10cassettes


7

In theory they are more efficient. Throughout the pedal stroke your leg doesn't give an equal amount of force - ideally you want to spend most of the time pushing down with the big thigh muscles and a minimum time in the horizontal movements at the top and bottom of the stroke. Elliptical front cogs give you a more up-down leg motion, so more time with ...


7

There's not much you can do aside from cleaning your drivetrain often and thoroughly. In the winter, ice is far less of a mechanical issue than is rock salt. You may indeed have some corrosion in the entire drivetrain by this point, not just the deraileur, or possibly just dirt if you're lucky. I'd do one major cleaning at this point, and see if that takes ...


7

Trek had a bicycle a few years ago named "Lime" which had 3 speed automatic gearing. I don't think it sold well. It used a gearing system called "Coasting" that was created by Shimano and actually controlled by a computer chip from signals from the front hub. "A dynamo is fitted on the front hub that gauges the revolutions of the wheel. It sends this ...


7

First, make sure your bike is fit properly - with a bad fit, your efficiency is likely lousy. More sprockets is not necessarily going to make you go faster/easier - changing gear appropriately and becoming more physically fit will (along with better selected sprockets sizes - we went ages before the Gillette razor-blade increase in rear sprockets...). Most ...


6

The difference probably arises because there is more tension being exerted on the chain when you are cycling as compared to the bike being up on a stand. The screws on the dérailleur (as you probably know) are for setting it to stop at the right place (ie not to come off either towards the wheel or off the small gear). Do you have shifters which move the ...


6

It is a little known fact that the Wright Brothers invented the left-hand thread for the left-hand pedal in 1900. Therefore, up until then it is highly unlikely that bicycles used any left-hand threads on them at all. Therefore, as noted by @Eric Silva the chainset could have been on the right because that is the simplest way for the sprocket to have been ...


6

Every two or three days is excessive. Biweekly should serve, even in winter months. The simplest thing would be to buy a chain cleaner and use it when you feel it's needed. Parktool provides excellent instructions as well as a suggested schedule for maintenance. In addition, you should switch to a heavier synthetic lube in the winter. I've personally had no ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible