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43

Do you hear a "tick" sound every time you spin the wheel anti-clockwise? that's the freewheel mechanism composed by two small parts called "pawls" and when you spin it on that direction, those pawls turn loosely until they find the "dent" in the inner mechanism (the ratchet body), that's when the "tick" sound happens. When you ride your bike, those two ...


25

The first rule is make sure the rear derailleur is adjusted correctly before adjusting the front derailleur. There are three adjustments that you can do on the front derailleur: Clamp Position Low limit stop High limit stop Clamp Position Here you can adjust the height of the derailleur, normally this is recommended as a 2mm clearance between the ...


21

It's likely a matter of convention, dating back to the first "safety bicycles" introduced in the 19th century. Drivetrains are on the right today because that's what bicycle builders decided to do in the late 1800s. As to why they originally decided to put drivetrains on the right, it's probably because rear cogs used to be screwed on (some still are). ...


14

I don't have an internal hub, but I want one for the following reasons: They are sealed and protected from the elements. They are nice for commuting because you can shift them while stopped... If you've ever stopped at a red light on a normal bike and struggled to get going again because of your gear, you can appreciate this. With an Internal hub, you can ...


13

Yeah. A modern double chainring is ramped and pinned, in order to be more easily shifted from one ring to the next. Simply put, the chainring "wants" to pass off the chain to the next cog. Without a derailleur to keep it in place, the lateral pull of the chain shifting across the rear, combined with some road jostling, can make the chain fall off the front. ...


12

The excess oil collects grit from the road, which acts as an abrasive that will wear out the chain.


12

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


11

http://www.landriderbikes.com They were very heavily advertised several years ago but currently they seem to show up more on craigslist than on TV.


10

This would never work due to fact that no force would be transmitted to the rear wheel until the derailleur cage was at maximum extension. The derailleur has to be below the chainstay to allow it to take up the slack in the chain. I suppose you could split the derailleur into to parts, one to keep the chain tension and the other to change gears, but that ...


10

The derailleur needs to guide the chain into the sprocket - which means it goes on the bottom. The tension pulley needs to go on the slack side of the chain - which again means it goes on the bottom (the top side of the chain loop has the drive tension). If the drive train was reversed, you could do it. Put the drive wheel in front and steer with your butt ...


10

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


9

A stretched chain will wear out gears (especially the rear cassette). You can see when this because the teeth get worn away to points - it's very obvious. But it's very unlikely you wore out a chain and gears in 1000 Km. What is more likely is that the cable has stretched slight from new and the derailuer is out of adjustment so it is putting the chain ...


9

There are a number of reasons that the shifting on your rear derailleur is not working well: The derailleur hanger (the bit of the frame that the derailleur bolts onto) could be bent. To check this look at the angle that the derailleur cage is at. When viewed from behind, it should be vertical, when viewed from above, it should be parallel to the ...


9

Answer: No you don't need a new hub. However, you will probably need to put a small (~1mm) spacer at the back of the cassette, otherwise you won't be able to tighten the whole cassette down. Also be aware that prolonged use of a 10-speed cassette on an 8/9-speed freehub body will cause dents to form in the freehub body (because the 10-speed cogs are so ...


9

Trek had a bicycle a few years ago named "Lime" which had 3 speed automatic gearing. I don't think it sold well. It used a gearing system called "Coasting" that was created by Shimano and actually controlled by a computer chip from signals from the front hub. "A dynamo is fitted on the front hub that gauges the revolutions of the wheel. It sends this ...


9

It's much better to open the chain. Derailleurs are not really designed to be opened repeatedly, and doing so inexpertly can potentially ruin the derailleur. Chains might have either a lock link or a master link of some kind, find that open the chain and then thread the chain through the derailleur. If the chain does not have one of these links, you will ...


9

From personal experience, having just changed to a cassette with less range, I have to say that smaller steps definitely offers some advantage. I went from an 8-speed 11-32 to a 12-23. Having a single tooth of difference between adjacent gears means that it's more likely that you will be in the "right gear". The "right gear" is the gear in which you aren't ...


9

Interesting question. Real world conditions are messy with multiple factors impacting any analysis, as such my answer will be speculative, but based on a number of sensible working assumptions. Chainring degradation as a source First lets consider how much material comes off a chainring. Generally speaking, if you replace your chain regularly before it ...


9

First things first: A belt is probably slightly less efficient than a properly installed clean chain. The test you link already indicates that. Probably with the tension Gates requires you'll loose a bit more power. On to your question: The chain is 200 grams heavier than the belt, of course with the chain you get gears, which you don't get with a belt ...


8

Assuming the hub is a freehub design (the freewheel mechanism is in a splined body onto which the cassette (sprockets) fit), no. 8, 9 and 10 speed cassettes are all the same width. See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/k7.html#10cassettes


8

Drivetrain components tend to wear in this order: Chain Rear cassette/sprockets Front chainrings (and the teeth on your derailleur's jockey wheels may last, but the bearings may not) The chain is usually the culprit for wearing out the other two. As it wears, the distance between links effectively increases, and the mismatch between the links and teeth ...


8

In theory they are more efficient. Throughout the pedal stroke your leg doesn't give an equal amount of force - ideally you want to spend most of the time pushing down with the big thigh muscles and a minimum time in the horizontal movements at the top and bottom of the stroke. Elliptical front cogs give you a more up-down leg motion, so more time with ...


8

I have ridden one - it used weights thrown out by centrifugal force and springs to move the derailleur in and out. Horrible is all I can say. Maybe it was me not being used to it, but things like not being in the gear you left it in, and less than smooth changes - which you have not idea when they are going to happen, especially under power. The only ...


8

The skipping will always be because of the chain touching on the other cogs, or trying to slip back down from the pull of the rear derailleur. The chain is too wide and, as you already know, is doing one or the other. It might not be evident from looking at the cogs while riding as the chain is fed from underneath when you pedal, so the clicking from the ...


8

The entire assembly is called the crankset. The ring with the teeth is called the chainring. The crankset consists of the crank arm, the spider and the chainrings. The chainrings bolt onto the spider which is the multi-armed piece connected to the crank arm. The right crank arm and spider are often one piece. Lower-end cranksets are forged or riveted ...


8

I don't think I've ridden that particular brand but I have ridden a couple (one flex, the other rigid). My experience was that on one bike especially I could feel the shaft wind up under power, which made me reluctant to apply full power (breaking someone's expensive shaft drive bike is a bad idea). The Dutch article covers the main problems. To recap: ...


8

I own & ride an XDS COM10 2014 bike. This is fitted with a Sussex (Taiwan) shaft drive transmission & Shimano Nexus 8 speed hub gear. I have used it regularly for over a year & travelled about 4000km on it without any issues . It works perfectly, smooth & quiet.I thought it was very reasonably priced at about AUD700 brand new on-line. It is ...



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