Hot answers tagged

13

I had a similar problem on my Pugsley, though it was under braking (discs) that I was kicking the wheel around in the dropouts. After talking with the guys at my LBS, I learned that I wasn't putting enough force into the quick release. They said that a good, tight, clamp should leave an imprint of the lever on your palm when you close it. It will be ...


11

If you're going to be respacing, I'd suggest an alternative method from sheldon's 2x4 method. Use a threaded rod with washers and nuts. It's far more controlled and easier to keep your frame aligned, plus you can keep it in the stand as you work. See here If you need to adjust the dropout alignment, you can adjust thusly


9

They look like you want those "in" the horizontal dropout. The bracket should cover the frame and as you tighten the bolt it will pull the axle further away from the cranks, tightening the chain along with it. Be careful to not over tighten as you want a little 'slack' in the chain. Also, it is very easy to tighten one side more than the other resulting ...


8

The QR interface is designed such that the axle is fully seated in the dropouts before engaging the QR. The QR engagement should be firm, but it is not designed to hold the wheel in the way you describe. Dangers of trying to do what you suggest are: Severely over-tightening the QR (which you may need to do to keep the wheel in place) could potentially ...


7

Are the skewers internal-cam or external-cam? Internal-cam QR skewers have more mechanical advantage and allow for more clamping force. They're also less affected by dirt and crud. If you don't have internal-cam skewers, get some. All you ever wanted to know about skewers, courtesy of Sheldon Brown.


7

I have seen this a few times where the axle is just a tad too long. No matter how tight you clamp your QR, it won't be snug enough. Did you buy the frame and build it up yourself? If it is the axle, you can pop the wheel out, remove the QR and take a file to one end or the other. Another possibility is the the wheel was built incorrectly and the axle ...


6

Whatever works. The main advantage of the standard drop bar is that it offers you multiple hand positions and multiple postures. In a sprint, or driving into a headwind, riding fully on the drops cuts wind resistance, but for less intense riding one of the several hand position on the top bar or on the hoods is usually preferred. And on long rides the ...


6

They aren't necessary, but they are a great help to properly aligning your wheel in the dropouts in an efficient manner. If these screws are adjusted correctly, you'll be able to just put your wheel in, pull it all the way back and tighten your axle nuts and your wheel will be arrow straight in the frame. If not, You'll need to manually align your wheel each ...


4

I had this same problem but i went to a bike shop and explained the situation, the bike mechanic gave me a serrated washer to be placed between the skewer and the bike frame on the cassette side. This solved the issue


4

Is this what you're looking for? KONA #CMPHCC Derailleur Hanger


4

You've lost the derailleur hanger mounting nut. Don't worry, they're dead cheap. Without it the hanger won't stay in place without the wheel nuts done up tight. You can get away without one (see matt's answer), but it's not ideal. It's better and less fiddly to use a proper mounting nut: The way you've set it up now is totally wrong - the triangle-...


3

That configuration is quite dangerous and clearly wrong. Do not ride the bike like that. Do not just tighten the nuts. I can clearly see the outline of where the derailleur was previously mounted. The derailleur should be mounted in a similar position. The small screw hole is a mount point for a carrier, which is probably why you cannot get things back how ...


3

I was able to use a surly tuggnut tensioner with my cross check frame with semi-horizontal, forward facing dropouts. No slipping after that. The end of the tensioner bolt bolt nested in the opening on the rear of the dropout where the long wheel positioner bolt would be installed. It would likely work on most bikes with this style of semi-horizontal ...


3

I have this problem myself. Take it as a compliment from your bike--it means you're capable of putting a lot of torque/power through the rear wheel! For me, the solution was to do what you've been doing--clamp down and take your wheel off sparingly. A better solution would be to purchase a quick release skewer with a rougher interface with the dropout. It ...


3

From your photo, it looks like you're fine. The load from the hub is being taken on the anti-rotation arm that you've attached to the lateral tubes of your mixte. So the anti-rotation washer (I'm presuming you're talking about the orange washer) is not being loaded. Also, as described in the responses to your previous question, your dropout is just ...


2

As I myself did not rediscover cycling until I was past fifty, I have found that some things get easier with time in the saddle and some things don't. I have consigned myself to not ride a drop bar bike again. Trying to lift my head high enough to see through my bifocals was too uncomfortable. I talked to friends and borrowed all manner of bars and stems ...


2

I would suggest two "first things" to do, having had these problems myself: Try to change the lenghth of cockpit, first via saddle fore-aft then via stem length. It is important, first of all, to find the proper position of your saddle fore-aft respective to your pedals, so you are not thrown backwards or forwards when you pedal hard while seated. ...


2

Sheldon Brown has another article on dropout spacing which you may want to read. The rear dropouts on road bikes are typically 120mm, 126mm, and 130mm. 135mm is usually found on mountain bikes. If you're planning to use MTB wheels on a road frame, you'll have other concerns besides spreading the dropouts. So far as I understand it, the rule of thumb says ...


2

Track frames use a 120mm rear dropout in most cases. You do have a horizontal dropout, but not a track dropout. It will work, but it is not ideal. The rear axle outside locknut distance on that frame is likely to be 127mm. Again, it is not ideal to compress the dropouts that much, but given that it is an older, fatigued steel frame, it will likely work....


2

Yes, it is unsafe. You should find a set of tires that will allow you to seat the wheel properly into the drop out.


2

The Element 70 has a 10mm x 135mm QR rear hub so the rear dropout will not be wide enough to fit a 12mm x 142mm wheel. The 12mm is the axle diameter, the 142mm the dropout width. New rear hub standards are not only larger diameter axles but wider hubs, front hubs are different in that you can use a thru axle with a shim to fit a QR dropout as the width did ...


1

I have started to notice a problem in my rear mech - the link arm screw that holds the mech to the dropout seems to slip and cause the whole derailleur to swing forward until the cogs are sandwiching the chain against the sprocket. Now I'm no doctor, but I can easily say that sort of cramping is bad. Strange that this would be where things are coming ...


1

So you might be about two links short, or you could move the wheel forward. The purpose of the adjusters is to make it easy to position the wheel. The tension on the quick release skewer is what actually keeps the wheel in place. From what you describe it sounds like the skewer wasn't generating enough tension. Try this: Locate the wheel where you want it ...


1

That shouldn't be happening - it sounds as though you have the wrong hanger on the bike. If you have replaced the hanger (or a previous owner has) they have probably used one that fits on the bike but isn't correct. You may be able to file it down to fit, but it's better to buy the right hanger. For your second question, it's definitely possible to swap out ...


1

My guess is that the rear hub is defective, or (at least for the first incident) was improperly assembled. If the cone lock nuts on the axle are not set tight enough, it's possible (especially with a slightly bad or poorly lubricated bearing) for the (probably right) cone nut to be pulled tighter and tighter until either the bearing seizes or the axle ...


1

You already more or less answered your own question. The reason is that in a freewheel hub the drive side bearing is close to the center of the axle. This gives the forces from your weight and pedaling much more leverage to bend the axle than on a Shimano-style freehub where the drive side bearing is located at the end of the axle. When the axle bends, it ...


1

If the issue was just the 1mm difference in the dropout, I would personally just file it out and note it in the Ebay feedback. With this one bent, contact the seller and see if there is a replacement/return option. Failing that you could try to get a shop to bend it back and bill the seller. If the seller gives you a lot of grief then take it up with ...


1

It will likely work fine and you wouldn't need additional hardware so long as your skewer has enough extra space to accommodate the extra width of those mount plates and still secure snugly. As far as what you need to be aware of, I'd be conscious of how often you remove your rear wheel. If you do so with any frequency, this could be a nightmare. I have a ...


1

Add a spacer and re-dish. Or move some spacers from the non drive side over the the drive side (if they exist) if you don't want to open up the frame (that will require opening up the hub likely). 1mm is not a big deal. You will also have to fiddle with the limits on your derailleur and adjust shifting accordingly. Or get a different cogset with something ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible