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1

The main point of failure, and in my opinion the largest disadvantage of dynamo vs battery lights, shared by both hub dynamos and side wheel dynamos is: wiring. The wiring on a bicycle is often very fragile, and in my experience it is always the first thing to break on any bike. This is especially true if you park in a bicycle parking area where your bike ...


1

As mountain biking specifically doesn't seem to have been addressed in above answers. Weight - who wants half a killo more when climbing a steep hill? Wear and tear - while both quality battery lights and quality dynamo lights are expensive, the latter will need to be replaced more often, due to the dynamo hub wearing out, after the bearings fill with ...


0

ROI for dynamo lights is poor in the era of LEDs for the bulk of the population (there are always exceptions of course). I can buy a nice set of LED front/rear lights for around $50. Add-on regular batteries for another $5 or so. OK, I'm in for under $60. I researched dynamos and I was looking at $250+ for just the power unit itself. Add-in another $50 ...


5

Taking 100kg of bike plus rider up a 0.3% grade generates a retarding force of 100kg*g*0.003=3N. At 24 km/hr=20/3 m/s that is 20 watts. If that is generating 1A at 5V, the efficiency is 25%. Yes, I picked numbers that were easy to calculate with. But I believe this is all marketingspeak and you shouldn't trust the numbers to an order of magnitude. ...



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