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21

I have sold a small quantity of electric bicycles over the years (including one to a 83 year old woman). Were these profitable sales, from the bike-shop's point of view? Not really... Frame + Extras Cost is different to price, clearly the bicycle costs more to build, e.g. in Giant's top-class Taiwan factory on a relatively limited production run. As ...


19

I've done a bit of work on old, neglected bikes at our local community bike shop. It's rewarding to bring a forgotten bike back to life. There are usually a lot of things that can be improved, so it's important that you prioritize carefully. Fix the most important things, get riding, and then fix the rest as you go along. You haven't told us much about your ...


10

A highly trained competitive cyclist can ride at ~ 350-400 watts of power output for a 2 hour ride. So adding a 400 watt electric assist motor is roughly equivalent to adding a competitive cyclist 'stoker' to your rig. The speed and battery size make a big difference but here are some rules of thumb: Some motors are measured in horsepower, rather than ...


9

In the UK an electric bike is more of a bike, due to the regulations. An electric bike must have a low top speed (15 mph) when powered by the motor, and is limited in its power output. In my experience on a cycle path you can’t tell the difference between a person on an electric bike and a normal bike until you look closely. The laws for electric bikes in ...


9

There are different electric bikes with different experiences. Some are heavy and powerful, and move with a push of a button. Their pedals are more about legal status than about human power. I'd call them "scooters". Some are designed to supply power only when the pedals are turning. In that case you have to do a little work for the electric motor to kick ...


7

In general, the softer the ground, the bigger the tire should be. A fat tire will let you "float" over the surface instead of sinking in, like a snowshoe. If you're sinking, it takes tremendous effort to keep riding, and you can't really steer. Gravels vary widely. Coarse-edged crushed rock locks together to create a firm, traffic-bearing surface. ...


5

The e-bike I've got is definitely more of a bicycle; it has a motor, but the motor only goes when you pedal. The purpose is to give you more of a boost than you'd get from foot power alone, especially when going up hills. But you do get exercise. The pedaling gets your heart pumping. What you don't get is those exhausting hills that leave you drained at ...


4

This is an oldie, but a good question. Many would-be electric cyclist get a lot of misinformation from corporate marketing, insurance companies, governments, etc.. Because ebike technology is in its relative infancy (compared to say gas engine vehicles like a motorcycle) a lot has been learned in the last 5 years! I ride a very similar to setup to what the ...


4

Has the tyre perished? Perhaps, it's just an inner tube that needs replacing. Take the tyre to your local bike shop and I'm sure they'll be able to suggest a suitable alternative. I'd ask for a plain road tyre, something pretty standard should do, just as long as it's the correct size. You don't need nobbly or off-road tyres unless you're trying to get over ...


4

The chain and rear hub are quite clean. Unless this was due to power washing, this indicates that the bike was very lightly used and probably needs little maintenance. (Confirm this by observing if the brake pads are very worn.) In particular, I'd check the bearings for play, but not disassemble/repack then unless there is significant play or other signs ...


4

I would say all three, combined with the fact that electric bikes are still somewhat of a niche market with few lowcost players. Consider that a cruiser/comfort frame standard bike like the ones for sale on the website would cost at £400-500 on their own. The battery (which is expensive for the capacity required to give a decent ride time), the mechanics ...


3

You might want to give us an idea of the distance but my wife has recently bought a freego hawk for a commute of 11km each way (about 2/3 your distance and flatter). The specs and list price are not disimilar. She's a little taller but this is a fairly forgiving frame layout. She gets 2 days round trips with the battery still showing 1/4 to 1/2 full, ...


3

To expand on the answer given by user crasic. First, the battery. The battery used by an electric bike has to be lightweight, compact, durable and be able to provide high power output - exactly the same as with power tools batteries. Please resist temptation to compare it with cheaper DIY tools - the latter are nowhere near the reliability requirements you ...


3

As far as motors go, usually the higher the voltages the more efficient they run. However there is a trade-off because usually the higher the voltage, the less efficient the battery is! Different systems may balance these factors at different points depending on how they expect the system to be used and what parts they have access too. I don't think you will ...


3

An electric bike doesn't require a special frame. The motor can be placed in the front hub, the batteries can be stowed in a more or less conventional rear rack, only "double decker" to make a slot for the battery, and controls can all mount on the handlebar. A perfectly conventional "mountain" bike frame can hold all this, without any modifications. ...


3

One of our bikes is an electric bike. It's an older iZip HG 1000, and although we got it through the American "manufacturer" (Currie Technologies), like most of the low-end ebikes it's made in China of heavy steel and uses cheap, cheap, cheap components. For example, it has these awful band brakes because they're slightly cheaper than cantilevers. (Those ...


2

As an addition to the other answers: Note that there are (at least) two types of bikes with electric motors: E-Bike Pedelec An E-Bike has a motor that will work without pedaling (like a motorbike); a pedelec will only support you while you pedal yourself (the motor is activated by pedaling). The latter is usually regulated like a bicycle in most ...


2

I think Daniel's trying to say that in an effort to reach the largest audience motor makers opt for a hub design because it is the cheapest. They're certainly the cheapest after-market upgrades. Motors that interact with the drivetrain can be more efficient but require solving engineering problems and so the cost goes up. Using the bike's transmission allows ...


2

As someone who has done that exact commute the better part of a decade (although on a non-powered bike) and limited experience with e-bikes (getting one for a family member) here are my thoughts. By bike route you are looking at 20 km each way (40 km total), with a very large climb (SFU Burnaby is on top of Burnaby Mountain; 1200 ft elevation and the West ...


1

For the most part, no. The main problem is that you don't brake for very long compared to a normal battery charging cycle, so regenerative braking doesn't match the battery very well. Some systems use supercapacitors because they're designed for this sort of situation, but those are expensive and heavy in a bicycle application. Motors also typically don't ...


1

Most front wheel motors will work on the trike and will install in a very similar way. There are a lot of kits on ebay, ranging in price from a couple of hundred dollars up through sensible prices to quite silly. See this question for some opinions on the cheap kits. Most crank motors will also work and be easy enough to install. This Sunstar kit, for ...


1

Again, it's the same as with battery powered power tools. Usually the higher the voltage the more powerful the motor is and the higher battery Volt-Ampere-hour (not Volt-Ampere alone) rating is. More powerful motor will usually (but not necessarily) mean higher torque and that will mean climbing steeper hills at higher speeds and accelerating faster. Higher ...


1

There are different types of e-bikes as described in other answers, but in the end it all depends on what the buyer had in mind. Even if an e-bike is intended for X, there are good chances that it's not what it's going to do. (See the number of suspension mountain bikes on the road) There are old and/or ill people who need assistance in tougher parts, there ...



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