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14

It's used for attaching a child seat similar to this one. The above site shows a clearer image of the part in question which might be useful to future visitors.


14

Novices I've ridden with are surprised and pleased that I ride behind them. They set the pace I can watch what they're doing I can ride close (enough to talk) without being too close (i.e. without colliding) I can recommend which gear they change and when I keep car traffic off their tail (e.g. by my using arm-signals to the car to say "slow down" or ...


12

These are cable guide parts. From the looks of it, you have: 2 Housing shims, used to secure hydraulic lines or brake housing in the braze-ons of the frame, or for securing the housing at the point it enters the frame in the case of internal housing. 1 Headset adjustment bolt button, used to keep water out of the bolt in the center of your headset cap, ...


9

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


8

Do I need to put myself through easier challenges/trainings before I embark on my planned trip? That depends. What is the farthest you've cycled in one go before now? I suggest you skip your next gym visit and go for a 10 mile cycle. If that works out, take a 20 mile cycle the next time. What food and equipment do I need? A spare tube, tyre, ...


7

This from an old article circa 1996 it references a Medai floor pump. "Screwed into the base near the compression tube is an air tight steel chamber. This chamber is known as a reservoir and holds a volume of the compressed air to assist in equalizing the pressure of the pumps compression chamber and the inner tube. This feature gives the tire a small assist ...


6

My ideal packing includes: Tools: Hex keys to fit your bike : 2mm, 4mm, 5mm the most important, 6mm and 8mm. Some bikes use 2.5mm and 3mm. A T25 driver if you have disk brakes. Phillips and flat screwdrivers. Chain tool and a master link or two (may need to remove twisted links). Tire Levers Patches, glue, extra tubes and pump or inflator. Spare Valves, ...


6

I have seen various tow rope devices based on bungie cords used in multi-event team races[1], but I'd suggest those are even harder to learn than drafting. Having someone pull on the bike unexpectedly can cause all kinds of control problems. It's not something I'd recommend using with a novice. It's generally only used on long uphill slogs. A tow rope just ...


5

Yeah, it's like overkill if you're riding on the street. I use a Busch & Muller lamp powered by a dynamo hub and it puts out plenty of light even when riding downhill on potholed roads. Also keep in mind lumens is only one factor in determining light quality. It's sort of like having a computer with a fast processor but not enough memory. More ...


5

Everyone's going to have different list depending on how confident they are of getting assistance in an emergency or gear breakage. I do some solo rides into the forests in New Zealand. When in the forest alone I do tend to stick to 4x4 tracks where a may see one person an hour but also take jungle tracks alongside the road and very rarely see anyone. I ...


5

Blinding road users will be the result of the following factors: Total light output Mirror design (how is the light shaped) How you aimed your light Most trail lights (and high output battery powered lights) use a mirror that casts the light in a symmetrical shape. This means light is cast up, down, left and right. Light cast above the horizon is what ...


3

Yes. Blinding oncoming traffic is certainly not in your best interest. Operating multiple running lights like you see on a semi truck would be better than purchasing a high power front or rear facing light. A brighter rear red light, with a touch of blue for colorblindness like stoplights have, is good to see you from behind. A more powerful front facing ...


3

I have done 120 mile touring and it was over either 2 days or 3 days. The easy estimate is 10 miles per hour for a bike ride. You can easily ride 50 miles in one day. With a distance of 169 miles, you should take around 4 days. Sometimes, the average speed is closer to 15 miles per hour. Also, you may take more or less time per day. I used both ...


3

Not much: A mini pump mounted on the bike, spare tube, tire leavers and the hex keys you might actually need in a Frame Bag. 1.5l of water with carbs (glucose and maltodextrin) as food. For longer rides an extra plastic bag with enough carbs for another 1.5l in the jersey. I’m usually experienced enough to pick the right clothing for several hours or a ...


3

I think your greatest challenge will be keeping to only 10 miles (16 km) per day. You do not mention any cycling experience your fitness level if you have a bike if you expect to camp if you will cycle on roads what you intend to spend. A person in normal good health could expect, with a little training, to ride 20 miles (32 km) before lunch and the ...


2

Get the slower cyclist a better bike and the faster cyclists a bike that is going to slow him/her down. When there are winds to consider, have the stronger cyclist take head and create a wind break, let the slower cyclist set the speed which can be done by cycling ahead or by the stronger cyclist paying a lot of attention on the companion. Take breaks ...


2

It's not just the number of lumens you have (*) -- its the distribution. You need to aim your light at the ground at an appropriate angle, not into the eyes of motorists. If you have something like a flood light like the coast guard uses, thats no good to aim -- bicycle-specific lights will be easier to aim in a proper manner. If your light is aimed ...


2

If you do not have a set schedule, and, in particular, you do not plan to cycle more than maybe 60 miles a day (through reasonably flat terrain) then anyone in decent shape can do a multi-day tour. You do not say how you plan to be "supported" for this trip. If you will be carrying all your own gear on the bike ("self-contained") you need a decent bike ...


1

I found this Bikepacking Repair Kit on Pedaling Nowhere. I like the way it is broken down into components of a tool kit and spares collection. There is some good stuff in the comments section too.


1

If your main worry is being seen by cars, then a superbright light isn't really the way forward. Besides being dazzling/blinding, a front light does very little for visibility from the sides and from behind, from which many (most?) collisions occur. A front light helps your visibility mainly when a car pulls out of or turns into a side road across your path ...


1

You can easily test if your light is too bright. Leave it on your bike and see how it looks. Nowadays there are lots of too bright LED flashlights and headlamps the market that were not designed for cycling. Problem is they flood the light to very wide angle. I would recommend a light made for cycling that has different modes for different use cases.


1

I help my wife up hills all the time so we can ride together with groups that are just a tad too fast for her while I still get some exercise. You have to have pretty good handling skills to do it, and I wouldn't try it off-road, but it's surprising how much of a difference a slight push will make on a hill. I just ride next to her with one hand on my ...


1

A very obvious way for a faster rider (or one with more stamina) would be to let the slower rider draft. It doesn't need to be tire-touchingly close, just enough for the follower to feel less wind. I think this would allow you to reach an average speed somewhere between the two riders. This sounds like a specific instance. The ride is long enough that you ...


1

There are a lot of good answers above. One thing that hasn't been mentioned: You (OP) said that you had a road bike and a mountain bike. Depending on the style of mountain bike, it may not work with some carriers that hold the bicycle from the top tube. There are adapters available to fix that: http://www.discountramps.com/bike-adapter/p/AA-8602/. Or, you ...


1

How are you helping to help this slower rider? With technique, conditioning, or something else? You could slow down and help them with technique for a ways, then sprint ahead and turn around. When you catch up, turn around and give them more pointers. I also suggest getting into a bigger group of riders where the novice rider can find more novice rider at ...


1

Looks like it might be a mount for a kid's bike seat.



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