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23

To ride in the dark is difficult. You should have a decent head light on your helmet so it tracks your vision, and a handlebar light that tracks where your front wheel is aiming. In addition you should have a secondary front light and two back lights for redundancy. We don't make product recommendations here, but that would be the minimum. To increase ...


10

At some point you are still on the bike, but the mistake has already been made and you are looking for the exit option that will minimise damage. Jamming the front brake on while in a tight corner does not 'minimise damage' Experience rider would have probably seen the debris earlier or not been riding as fast, and is always thinking what alternatives they ...


10

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


6

My ideal packing includes: Tools: Hex keys to fit your bike : 2mm, 4mm, 5mm the most important, 6mm and 8mm. Some bikes use 2.5mm and 3mm. A T25 driver if you have disk brakes. Phillips and flat screwdrivers. Chain tool and a master link or two (may need to remove twisted links). Tire Levers Patches, glue, extra tubes and pump or inflator. Spare Valves, ...


6

Bilateral asymmetry in pedaling is well-known and long-studied. You can see the abstract of a review of what is known about bilateral asymmetry in running and cycling here. During cycling, bilateral pedaling asymmetry is common, and not fixed at a particular split: it varies with cadence, power, duration, and your ride goals. Another article that is highly ...


5

Everyone's going to have different list depending on how confident they are of getting assistance in an emergency or gear breakage. I do some solo rides into the forests in New Zealand. When in the forest alone I do tend to stick to 4x4 tracks where a may see one person an hour but also take jungle tracks alongside the road and very rarely see anyone. I ...


4

There are various proprietary brands of security hardware such as pinhead and pitlock. I use the former on both my bikes, for the wheels (QR and nutted), headset, saddle and seat post. Pinhead fittings at least are stocked both side of the Atlantic (I suggest with either that you buy a spare key at the same time). The bike I keep outside has further ...


4

Your front brake is your most effective stopper but there's a fine line between slowing down and sliding out. The technique to practise is applying enough pressure to your front brake lever without applying too much. Too much depends on the road surface as well as your bike. Learning how to drift a bit is a very useful skill, not to mention the most fun ever,...


3

Not much: A mini pump mounted on the bike, spare tube, tire leavers and the hex keys you might actually need in a Frame Bag. 1.5l of water with carbs (glucose and maltodextrin) as food. For longer rides an extra plastic bag with enough carbs for another 1.5l in the jersey. I’m usually experienced enough to pick the right clothing for several hours or a ...


3

We have 50 cyclists at work, out of 170 people. When I started the spares were the odd tube on a desk, perhaps without holes, and the only tools in the place was a floor pump and about 60x 6mm hex drivers. I had a cleanout and rationalise at home, and brought in some surplus screwdrivers and so on. Other people have done the same, so there's now a work ...


2

For those of you that want to commute on a nice bike in bad neighborhoods, let me give you a few tricks that have served me well. Replace all quick release fixtures with tooled fixtures. This is generally a small investment. Take a black marker to all component markings, making all those Deore XT's look at first glance like no-name-brand cheapo ...


2

Strava is the de facto standard these days. Has some nice social features, like segments where your times are compared against others, friends and messages. Training Peaks is more of a training log than a social platform, has some nice features for planning and talking to a coach. Polar, Garmin, etc. have their own home made solutions. I've not personally ...


1

I would highly advise to just get a cheap second hand bike and a good lock. A new bike is the main target for casual robbers which are the most and there isn't much you can do against professional ones(who go for expensive stuff manly in order to sell in pieces). So getting a cheap in first place and second hand(dirty old looking) in second place will make ...


1

I found this Bikepacking Repair Kit on Pedaling Nowhere. I like the way it is broken down into components of a tool kit and spares collection. There is some good stuff in the comments section too.



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