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1

If your main worry is being seen by cars, then a superbright light isn't really the way forward. Besides being dazzling/blinding, a front light does very little for visibility from the sides and from behind, from which many (most?) collisions occur. A front light helps your visibility mainly when a car pulls out of or turns into a side road across your path ...


-2

How to put this politely.... Disagree with you buddies all you like, but stop being a Selfish Cyclist who cares for no one but himself. Consider that your actions in running a light that bright on the road are the ones that make otherwise normal drivers cyclist hating psychopaths. The law will not be on your side if your light is bright enough to be ...


3

Yes. Blinding oncoming traffic is certainly not in your best interest. Operating multiple running lights like you see on a semi truck would be better than purchasing a high power front or rear facing light. A brighter rear red light, with a touch of blue for colorblindness like stoplights have, is good to see you from behind. A more powerful front facing ...


5

Blinding road users will be the result of the following factors: Total light output Mirror design (how is the light shaped) How you aimed your light Most trail lights (and high output battery powered lights) use a mirror that casts the light in a symmetrical shape. This means light is cast up, down, left and right. Light cast above the horizon is what ...


1

You can easily test if your light is too bright. Leave it on your bike and see how it looks. Nowadays there are lots of too bright LED flashlights and headlamps the market that were not designed for cycling. Problem is they flood the light to very wide angle. I would recommend a light made for cycling that has different modes for different use cases.


5

Yeah, it's like overkill if you're riding on the street. I use a Busch & Muller lamp powered by a dynamo hub and it puts out plenty of light even when riding downhill on potholed roads. Also keep in mind lumens is only one factor in determining light quality. It's sort of like having a computer with a fast processor but not enough memory. More ...


2

It's not just the number of lumens you have (*) -- its the distribution. You need to aim your light at the ground at an appropriate angle, not into the eyes of motorists. If you have something like a flood light like the coast guard uses, thats no good to aim -- bicycle-specific lights will be easier to aim in a proper manner. If your light is aimed ...



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