Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

It's more or less a math question. A way from Athen to London without using a ferry if not absolutely necessary (Canal), it is approximately 3200 kilometers. So if you have an average speed of 15 km/h (mountainbike) or maybe 25 km/h (racing bicycle) it would take approximately 214 respectively 128 hours to cycle the route. As always for such rough ...


20

Get a printed map and look for the 'postal roads'... There are 'postal roads' in Switzerland that are closed to normal cars. These go over some high passes that are just not wide enough for regular traffic. They are called 'postal roads' because only the post bus goes on them. What is amazing about them is the descents - you can ride 'TdF' style without ...


18

In Holland, were I assume cycling is much more common than in Poland, the kind of traffic sign you describe are abundant (see example, "uitgezonderd" is Dutch for "except for"). And cycling against traffic in a one-way street without the sign is indeed illegal. The same rules seem to apply in Poland, though I cannot find a reliable source for Polands cycling ...


14

Just to add to FatHippos answer: The same applies to Germany. In my home town there was a survey of all one-way roads between 2004 and 2010, which resulted in most of them now being open for bikes in both directions. These roads are also marked explicitly with a sign like the one you describe.


13

There is also a Czech version of allowing you to bike 'the other direction'. Biking against the one way direction is not much of a crime here and where the traffic is low, it's usually tolerated. I'd advise against biking the wrong direction in traffic heavy places like city centers, though, even when it's allowed. These signs (and corresponding ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


7

Give yourself a week to follow the Loire down to the Alps, a couple of weeks to cruise around lake Geneva, through Interlaken, Liechtenstein (to add an extra country to the bedpost), Graz, Vienna and on to Budaspest. Remember that it is one Alp a day unless you are a TdF rider, so be prepared for some astoundingly steep climbs and low mileages if you go the ...


5

I don't know any community bike shops in the Netherlands, never really heard it this although I understand what you mean. What you will find, is a Repair Café. It's a place where people get together helping each other repair their stuff. Often there's tools of all kinds and you can usually bring a bike too. It has a big community aspect; you can use each ...


5

I would be in favor of waiting until you move. There is the possible problem of needing service work under warranty and the nearest dealer being some distance away. You must also factor in the shipping cost along with the expense of disassembly and reassembly if you can't do it yourself. There is also no better way to start a good relationship with your ...


5

There are several places to avoid if you are looking for a cheap bike, and several places to seek. First to avoid: Generally bikes tend to be pricier / lower quality in all towns with a big university because demand is high and many bikes are "consumed" by the buyer. Lots of exchange students buy a bike and discard it after a year rather than resell it, ...


5

Roflcopter already tackled the actual route planning more completely than I ever could. I thought I'd add a bit about the time you can expect to take. This depends mainly on the following: The amount of cycling you do in regular life Regardless of how fit you are, your body needs to adjust to the cycling if you are not a regular cyclist. Plan trips of ...


5

In France, the sign was made explicit and a special contraflow lane was added. All roads where you can cycle against the flow on a one-way road is marked with this sign: This is a very common occurrence in cities where cycling is popular! See this wikipedia article for a bit more background, although the french version is more extensive.


4

I concur with PeteH's answer, with the caveat that local bike cultures, and certainly individual bike shops, can sometimes skew heavily in the direction of a specific kind of riding or a specific kind of rider... who may not be you. So it's completely fine to walk out of a local bike shop that treats you like something you'd scrape off the bottom of your ...


4

Have a look at http://blog.ch3.gr/ He is an average cyclist who did a UK to Greece ride 3 years ago and has captured all important information in that blog.


4

That page actually lays it out pretty well. You have three options: box/bag your bike, pay £30 for a reserved bike space, or pay £22 to ship your bike such that it will arrive within 24 hours of you. The reserved bike spaces and shipping don't require you to box or bag your bike. When I traveled on EuroStar and on French trains, I had a friend handy with a ...


4

In Amsterdam, bikes collected by the city (gemeente) are stored in the fietsdepot. Summary information is available in English. I would call them to get the latest and most accurate info, but according to their website, the bikes can be purchased in two ways: If one has a Stadspas, which is a city pass obtainable by lower income folks, then you can go to a ...


3

If you really want to be sure the bike isn't stolen: The Dutch Police also has a tool called Fiets diefstal register (fdr). All bikes that are reported stolen to the police are put in this register. You can either search for a chipnumber which can be found on higher quality locks (long number starting with 999 or 975), or you can search for the framenumber, ...


3

I took part in a charity ride from Scotland to Italy in June last year, and that was made a lot easier with the use of a support team to help carry everything. Since you are going it alone, you need to consider quite a lot of things: Directions It's fine planning a route, but they often don't go to plan. Always be prepared to make alterations at the last ...


2

This sign is also common in france; it means no entry except for bicicles.


2

In UK it would not be allowed unless there was an additional sign stating otherwise. The same rules apply to all vehicles on the road. I don't think Google maps necessarily actually always accurately provide the best route. For example from my house it would better to get off the bicycle and cross the park on foot than cycle around the roads to get to the ...


2

The first thing to do is find the local bike shops (preferably locally owned, not large multinational chains) and look around and ask around there. Try to check multiple shops, not just the first one you find, since they may specialize and you may find some easier to work with. Try chatting with the staff; if they don't carry what you're looking for they may ...


1

A specialized bike shop is a good idea, but so are bike co-ops and related things. A dealer who specializes in used bikes is a good bet as well - it will be cheaper probably and they will probably have a selection of good commuters.


1

Having converted 2 70-something Motobecans, take to your best local shop to figure out what fits your bottom bracket. As Mikes asked French? Reverse threads? As a last resort, Velo Orange has a bracket that will work. DO get rid go the cottered cranks!


1

If you are coming to the Uk then the British Cycling website is probably the place to start.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible