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14

Adding mud-flaps to both fenders will greatly reduce spraying water on to your bottom bracket, feet and bicyclists riding behind you. Mud-flaps can be made easily & cheaply by cutting a part of plastic bottles for milk /water/soda-pop and screwing them on to end of mud-guard/fenders (ensure there is enough clearance between screw and tire). Plastic ...


14

Don't forget lights. Many people who only ride during the day/nice weather don't bother to put lights on your bike. But in heavy rain, it's sometimes darker (especially closer to sunrise/sunset), and visibility is reduced. Having lights and also reflectors will help you to be seen and improve your safety. If you don't mind getting wet, and use a waterproof ...


10

For riding in the rain, I would definitely recommend putting fenders on your bike that cover as much of the wheel as possible. This will help prevent "skunk stripes" on the back of your clothes due to dirt thrown up by the rear wheel. Fenders also generally help keep water from flying all around during riding, which keeps other things from getting as wet to ...


8

Mudguards (typically called fenders in the US) are a great feature and come in many varieties. The fenders you have are full-coverage fenders and are likely aluminum. Metal fenders are still quite common (and in my opinion, fenders are an essential addition to any bike if you live where it rains. Velo Orange manufactures many sizes and styles that are ...


7

I have a very similar setup (SKS Chromoplastics), and can say the following: I installed a suspension forks and then the former length of the metal wires bacame too long for the setup. I BENT them in a sharp turn to run parallel to the mudguard (of course it can be bent in any suitable direction, just NOT point straight back like yours). Haven't had any ...


7

You could try something with slightly less coverage like the sks raceblades. However, the sks commuter fenders have less clearance in the back. It still might be too much though. Clip on fenders like the portland design work soda pop fenders may be an option for you as well, but they provide less coverage overall. Fenders are one of those things that are ...


7

I have a pair of SKS Race Blades (e.g. from Wiggle). They clip on and off really easily, for washing, security or just for the long days of summer when rain is decidedly unlikely. They are reasonably small and should fit all but the tightest of clearances. For all the reasons you mention, I use them - cleanliness of my legs, back, bag and chain - but also ...


6

I use rubber patches from used tubes. It not always look nice, but besides dampening the rattling itself, they also dampen the sound propagation along the fender (depending of course on the amount of rubber). EVA could also be a good alternative. Other think I sometimes have to make is to preload the metal plates which run from side to side along the ...


6

I think it's a problem that must be solved on a one-off basis, since there so many different fender/bike combinations. First make sure the connections are really tight. Often they work loose over time. Then try to observe what's rattling. Some heavy tape applied to points that tend to knock against the bike frame may help. Different fenders that are ...


6

I think the first step would be to work out what is causing them to fall out of alignment. Possibilities include: Vibration when riding causing fitting screws to loosen or parts to rotate Leaning your bike against something when parked Someone leaning their bike against yours or tampering with them In case 1, you can remove the screws and refit them with ...


5

I can't speak as a user of them, but I can as one who has followed them. They seem to work reasonably well, but they aren't as good at protecting people behind you - the arc behind them is narrower than the traditional curved in guard. I would think that in this regard, wider would seem to be better In this they are better than the horizontally flat guards ...


5

Probably fine I have a bike (Surly LHT) with 700c wheels, wide tires (35mm) and full fenders (I think same model, but next size up). The local buses have 2 or 3 different types of rack, and it works on all of them. On some of the 3-bike racks it's difficult to get the arm over the tire in the middle rack, but the fender isn't really a problem; usually I ...


4

Try the Planet Bike Cascadia fenders. When you install them, use fender washers (they have the same inner diameter as regular washers, but the outer diameter is bigger) for more support. Space the fender so that it arcs over the wheel smoothly. Forcing it up to the brake bridge on the seat stays or the BB bridge will create a stress riser and crack the ...


4

You mention that you do not like the extra cost of the SKS fenders, but I would say that I have had excellent luck with them lasting 3+ years with no issues at all. They are incredibly well made, and while not the cheapest on the market, they are not Honjos @ $100/pair either.


4

I've had good luck with Planet Bike fenders. I've got these on my commuter, and they work nicely and don't rattle. When things do start to rattle, sometimes you can fix it with a few zip ties.


4

They come with bolts because QR's typcially don't clamp with enough force to keep the wheel from slipping forward. It looks like you have rear facing dropouts, so you should easily be able to use QR's if you get yourself a Surly Tuggnut. That little circle on the side of it is a QR adapter. You just pop it in and then slide your skewer all the way ...


3

I've had success with leather washers. They go between the mudguard and the screw-hole. The idea is to keep the mudguard from being able to pivot (and bang into stuff and make noise). FWIW, I run 35mm honjo fenders on 25mm conti tire.


3

Use a hacksaw or a dremel tool to zip out a notch in the tab like this: This will allow you to slide the fender onto the brake bolt and tighten everything down without losing vertical fender adjustability. If you wanted to add a bit of security, bend the very ends (maybe 2mm) of the tab in a vise so that it can't slide out (though, if your front brake has ...


3

Benzo already hit all the high points. IMO, it depends on the weather you get and the amount of coverage you need. I've had quite good luck with the seatpost clip on fender (SKS Xtra-Dry Rear Seatpost Fender). It can be adjusted up or down and moved out of the way if you need to hold the bike vertically. If that arrangement doesn't work for you (buy ...


3

At the risk of sounding snarky, I just want to add one thing to the otherwise excellent advice in the answers: motivation. Safety considerations aside, you don't really need any accessory to commute in bad weather. It is more a matter of how much discomfort you're willing to tolerate. "The gear" is not what is holding you back. Sure you can go all out and ...


2

I've had my folder on the bus racks, with it's fenders, and it wasn't a problem. But that's with smaller wheels than your Tempo, so I'm not sure if that really answers your question. FWIW, the bar always seems to extend further than I need for the road bikes, so I don't see why it wouldn't extend enough to go past your fenders.


2

From the Topeak website, the front one attaches like this: and the rear one like this (onto the seatpost): so it's likely they'll both fit. A search for the Topeak FX Mudguard on Google Shopping gives me various ones at less than £9 as does the Topeak RX Mudguard. This place allterraincycles.co.uk appears to have both the front and rear in stock and ...


2

For your bike I would probably recommend a 'moto style' front fender that uses an expansion fitting in the steerer tube to remain fixed in place. My reason being that it does not look like you have eyelets on that fork for easy full fender installation. http://bontrager.com/model/06254 A seatpost clamp style rear fender is my recommendation. Again, it ...


2

I have suspension fork with absolutely no brazeon or eyelets. I have SKS Chromoplastics which I used to attach the normal way to my previous steel fork, which had the eyelets. These Chromoplastics, if not perfect, have served me very well for some years now (with a lot of off-road abuse). These fenders are currently being manufactured in an "upgraded" ...


2

My first step would be to scuff the surface with a Scotch Brite pad. You want some minor surface imperfections for the paint to adhere to. Clean the surface with either alcohol or what the instructions for the particular paint call for. I am partial to automotive brake cleaner. If you can get it, use Rustoleum Spray specifically for plastic. Apply two coats ...


2

I'd like to add some points to the otherwise good recommendations: A fully closed chainguard so the chain doesn't get wet An internally geared hub so performance is not affected I don't know the word, but a mudguard at the side of the wheel, such as in the creative image posted below, can be quite helpful. Be extra visible! Source: Baykedevries, ...


2

I've always used a quick release for the front of my fixed gear bike, I've only ever used the bolts on the back. His highness Sir Sheldon Brown says you should be okay to use a quick release with an enclosed cam ( not an exposed cam ) with an acorn nut that has steel teeth ( not aluminum teeth ). http://sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html disclaimer: there's no ...


2

Mudguards can be measured in a few different ways, so different brands may vary. And it seems the SKS model numbers and names have recently changed, so some websites may still refer to the old names. For SKS Chromoplastic, 'P35' refers to the width of the mudguard. For it to fit, the guard has to be a bit wider than the tyre, probably at least 5mm more. ...


1

You might want to look into vinyl dye. It can be used for things that have to flex and won't chip off.



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