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25

A heavier bike may not handle as well as a lighter bike, and can be less enjoyable to ride. It's more fun to ride farther and faster, so a lighter bike is probably more likely to be used. Also, you can make a bike heavier by hauling stuff on it, it's hard to make a bike lighter! I'd suggest that someone who wanted to get in shape pedal further and faster ...


24

Rob, you are correct that a heavier bike will give you a greater fitness benefit over the same distance. The only real counter-point I have is that the most effective bikes for fitness are the ones that get ridden. So, if some reason a lighter bike would more fun or appealing to you (while still be a "good enough" commuter), than a lighter bike could be a ...


22

For any given speed, you can either spin at a higher cadence in a lower gear, or a lower cadence in a higher gear. The high cadence + low gear combination should reduce the strain on your joints since you don't have to push as hard. You just have to do it more often. I like to ride around 90rpm and sometimes drift up to 100-110 especially if I'm trying to ...


17

To a large extent the comment by @wdypdx22 is correct. The primary exception being if you are working out in a hilly area. The weight or mass of the bike and rider makes a big difference in the initial acceleration, but once moving on flat ground inertial effects take over. While most riders do all they can to keep from starting and stopping frequently, ...


16

The answer to this question is dependent on a number of factors, but the short answer is just 'yes'. If you are purely looking for weight loss then the equation is calores in minus calories out equals delta, and so long as the delta is negative, i.e. that you burn more than you consume, then you will lose weight. It's just simple arithmetic. So, in the ...


14

Advice in book Racing Weight by Matt Fitzgerald goes something like this, paraphrased: Yes, training without carbohydrates will train your body to use stored fat better. But your capacity to train will go down (not enough fuel!), and net result will be less improvement. It references this study, which compares two groups of athletes on hi-carb and low-carb ...


14

First off, if the soreness is such that you feel painful stabs when you move/stretch the muscles you definitely should rest for awhile (at least several days, maybe up to 6 weeks), and perhaps should see a doc. This can be a sign of tendinitis, muscle pulls, or a muscle disorder, and continuing to exercise in such conditions can lead to permanent damage. ...


12

I would think some sort of a tricycle would be the best choice for you, probably a recumbent. Something like this is the first thing that comes to mind: You lay in a reclined position and pedal with your feet in front of you. These come in several variants, from fully reclined (such as the above) to more upright. There are also numerous variations of ...


10

As I became more experienced I noticed that I began to spin at a higher cadence. I typically stay between 85-95 now, while when I started I spun at around 70. But cadence is a very individual thing, and bike fit can play a large part in how comfortable you are at a particular cadence. If you find that you want to pedal faster, but have difficulty ...


10

The "pure" answer to the question as asked is probably as others have said, climb as much as possible. But perhaps a better answer is to admit that cycling is awesome for aerobic fitness and leg strength but not as great on the upper body. Obviously, cross-training is an option, but even if you are 100% committed to your bike, you can probably get ...


9

what are the drawbacks of using an exercise bike? Noise (you mentioned this) Many quickly get bored riding on an exercise bike Promotes bad cycling form Can be large, heavy, expensive My favorite alternative to riding in the snow in the winter is to ride on rollers. The rollers I have used have several advantages Not as boring Amazing for form ...


9

What to do: Eat well, but don't overdo it. A hearty meal the night before and a solid breakfast the morning of the ride are a must. Stay well-hydrated. Get plenty of sleep. If you've been burning the midnight oil lately, cut back on your riding and catch more z's. Feel free to ride, but go for less distance and intensity than you normally would. Lube ...


9

Informally, I find that on long rides, your body will simply know what it needs. You pull off at a stop; the trail mix and pickles look delicious, so you eat them. More scientifically though, your body can process about two servings (e.g., bottles of gatorade, gel packs, etc.) of carbohydrate per hour. Any more than this, and you can experience ...


9

250-260 pounds isn't that heavy. You may not need to worry about weight at all. See if you can find the information from the manufacturer about weight limits for their bikes. For a mountain bike that you intend to use for what it was made for, you're probably within the weight limit the bike is designed for. You may want to avoid the lightest weight stuff ...


8

Echoing what others have said, anything that gets you riding trumps all else. If you would ride to work, but not in the wet, fenders will help you get fit. If that's what it takes to get you riding, that's the most important thing to do. Do you wear a suit at work? Drive your car 1 day / week, so you can keep fresh clothes at the office. Suddenly driving ...


8

Because fast is fun, and exercising for fitness is often not fun. Faster is funner. :-) Or in more 'justifiable' form: Making your fitness activities fun makes it more likely that you'll continue doing them, and gain the fitness you want. A lighter and more responsive bike is definitely more fun, therefore if you're serious about fitness, you may want a ...


8

There are a number of reasons you could be cramping - if that is, in fact, what it is. You are not properly warmed up before exerting yourself You are exceeding your limit of fitness You are not properly hydrated You have not eaten enough food to fuel your ride Without additional information it's really hard to diagnose something like this, but those are ...


7

From experience and from what little I've read cadence beats power (and cadence with power is the winner) - in general you want to be turning the pedals more often with less effort in a smooth motion not stomping down each time. To which end you probably want your cadence to be in the 90+ region as consistently as possible (including when climbing) I'm not ...


7

There's already a cacophony of answers, but their detail obscures the simple response to your question: no, a heavier bike will not help you get fit easier than a light bike. Simply put, you will output the same amount of power independent of the weight of the bike you are riding. On a heavier bike, you will just go slower than you would have otherwise on a ...


7

The best solution I've ever had for bonking is a cola. Full of pure sugary goodness and water plus caffeine. If seriously exhausted, five minutes off the bike lying down with your eyes closed can help you eke out more miles. The second best solution I've had is beer. Often times if I stop to have a beer or two I don't even mind that I'm not continuing to ...


7

Bonking is normally caused by lack of food. I happen to be an expert at this (just bonked on a ride today, in fact). Treatment is easy: Stop Eat something -- even if you don't want to (which is often the case) Catch your breath and then continue at an easy pace When the calories hit your bloodstream, you'll start to feel better Sugary foods work ...


7

The canonical recommendation is for "a complete and balanced diet". Whatever 'supplements' you might need depend on what your current diet is. The recommendations I've been given (I'm 50 and commute 24 miles/day) from a dietitian are vitamin D (because I live in Canada - I suspect that recommendation is obsolete currently while I'm commuting 2 hours/day in ...


7

You can climb a hill basically three different ways: Spinning up the hill in low gear at high RPM Charging up the hill standing up (or at least really pumping the muscles sitting) Grinding up the hill at 20-30 RPM Of those, the third one is a good way to wreck your knees and generally make yourself miserable. The other two, however, are both perfectly ...


7

First off, can you explain a bit more about how you "don't feel very good"? Do you feel at all queasy? Do you feel especially weak? Also, how often do you exercise so intensely, and how long have you been doing it? And how long does this period of feeling unwell typically last? Anyway, there are several possibilities (though most apply to rides longer ...


7

I think there are two important ways to use your upper body riding a bicycle: Ride very steep hills, where you need to pull up the handlebar and swing your upper body to counteract the torque on the pedals (specially if you ride a bike without extra-low gears); Riding over technical terrain, like XC mountain bike and other stuff. While commuting, you can ...


7

Unfortunately, I don't feel able to talk about food QUALITY, since even "vegan" can mean a lot of things these days, and this understanding varies from person to person. Just to illustrate, I'm not sure to suggest cheese, honey, milk and eggs, although I do find these to be excellent heavy-fuels for cycling. Now what I do feel sure to advise, being an ...


7

If you are looking to use your bike primarily as a commuter, then I don't think it's neccesary to get a Road bike meant for fitness cycling or racing. I'd recommend getting a bike that is going to a) meet your needs as a commuter and b) is built with quality components. What are common needs or wants for a commuter? Mounts for fenders - to keep you drier ...



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