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10

Wait a little before you buy a new saddle. It takes some time for both your butt and the saddle to adjust to each other. Wider and softer saddles are only more comfortable for shorter rides or very upright riding positions. 17 km and 50 minutes are a very good point to start. Depending on your time constraints and where you live you can either do longer ...


9

If you really want to measure how much effort you're putting in, you should look into getting a power meter. It measures the actual wattage you output, and can therefore be used to calculate total energy output. However, they are quite expensive. The other option is to get a heart rate monitor along with cadence and speed meters which together can give you ...


5

A few simple tips: Whether it's cycling, running or any other physical activity the more gradually you build up your mileage, the better off you'll be in the long run. A good rule of thumb is don't increase your time or mileage by more than 10% a week. Carrying on a conversation with someone should be difficult but not impossible. If you can't carry on a ...


3

The short answer is no, there is no standard equivalent for effort between distance and elevation. Of course, as others have mentioned, they are connected by the amount of effort you put in. But as you ride faster on the flat, the power required to drive you along rises as the square (some say the cube) of your speed. So riding 10% faster takes 20% to 30% ...


3

17km/10miles under 1 hour is not so bad for beginner. The best way to improve your stamina is to have constant speed in a long run. You don't have to push yourself too hard and going flatland is good but picking a distance with some kind of small uphill and downhill is better for you. It will build your muscle dynamically. Try to go a little faster and ...


2

Heart rate is a better indicator to see if you're working too hard. There is a very good book call Fitness Cycling I used that gives you recommended training schemes from beginner to amateur racing. When I read it and followed it what surprised me most was that most of the cycling should be done for long distances but not doing much work. It does rely on ...


2

You mentioned wanting to loose weight, that's one of my projects too. There is some interesting research out there suggesting that the problem of loosing weight is more than just "making output exceed input." You might take a look at Grant Peterson's book Just Ride, it is a collection of short essays on practical biking and includes a good section on health ...


2

It really depends on speed. If you go slow (and there is no headwind) then riding on the flat is almost effortless (rolling friction is a very small factor with properly-inflated road tires). What slows you on the flat is wind resistance, and the faster you go the more wind resistance you face. On the other hand, climbing a hill of a given height consumes ...


1

It depends on other factors as well. A big one is speed. When you climb a hill, there is a minimum energy expenditure to get up the hill. On the flat, there is almost no minimum, but riding 10 mph is much easier than 15 mph (or whatever range of speeds is suitable for you). If you climb hills fast, you will get tired quickly. Elevation gain can be ...


1

I'd say you could go with HIIT (high intensity intervals) on a treadmill. For example a particular training I like and find helpful is: 6-8 sets of: 1 minute very fast (18km/h for me) 1 minute middle speed (12km/h in my case) 1 minute slow (8-9 km/h) and no stops in between. That's a very good yet pretty hard training. Do not more than twice a week.



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