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26

The gearing of your bike seems reasonable, the 26 front/34 rear combination will (eventually) make climbing hills easy. But till then… Before you do anything else, take @cherouvim's advice and make sure you seat is at a reasonable height. It should be high enough that if you place a heel on the low pedal your leg is almost fully extended (just short of ...


11

If you really want to measure how much effort you're putting in, you should look into getting a power meter. It measures the actual wattage you output, and can therefore be used to calculate total energy output. However, they are quite expensive. The other option is to get a heart rate monitor along with cadence and speed meters which together can give you ...


11

Just keep on doing the same route and you'll see progress very fast. Also this will soon not be true: It's not so fun on the way back though Some tips to make it: make sure that the tyres are inflated correctly make sure your drivetrain runs smooth and the chain is lubed make sure your seat height is correct (ask your LBS if unsure) conserve energy ...


9

No - Struggling away in the small rear cog/large front chainring combo is bad. Fitness is an overall term that has many components, so: If you want power you need to work on intervals, which is as fast as possible at full power for short burst times, then recovery time at a middling state. If you want to train for endurance, being at the steady state for ...


8

There are no shortcuts, it's about building the legs, and lungs, and body. There may be some factors that could make it a little easier, but the main factor is getting strong enough, which takes some time and some dedication. Starting in the easiest gear may not be the best choice as it can make a climb seem endless. Try to get into the hill at good speed, ...


8

You have a specific training question that your coach ought to be able to answer for you, and I will not address that here. A larger general issue is one that I will address, since it is of wider interest. Your general concern is that you won't be able to simulate race conditions in training, especially long steady output. However, speed is determined by ...


7

The physics model of cycling power and speed has been validated in the real world. Two examples are this and this. The model embedded in Analyticcyling.com's online calculator is based on these two papers. Whether the amount of difference calculated by the validated models is worth it to Joe and Billy is a question that can't be answered by the physics.


6

You already have some good, helpful answers. Well done for sticking at that hill! Make sure you're riding on slick tires, and have them pumped up pretty hard. Soft, wide tires would rob much of your effort. Regarding the hill. There are several things involved in sustained climbing Technique. Do you rush at it the bottom? Or do you try to just settle to ...


6

(1) Go Slow and Go Easy On Yourself. Climbing hills is supposed to be hard! You are carrying 250 lbs (you, bike, your stuff) 264 feet straight up over that mile. I was riding once with a guy who has a PowerTap hub (a $500 toy for bike nerds and pro athletes that reports energy expenditure on your bike computer), and he said the main thing he had learned ...


6

The bike can do it, and so can you, though maybe not yet. My old commute had a 20-25% hill on it, and my bottom gear was 28x32 on 700x35 tyres. It took a few goes before I could ride up it without stopping. It wasn't as long as yours but the total climb was probably similar. Take it easy, you don't want to be breathing hard on approach (a slightly ...


5

I had this problem some years ago. I commuted to work Monday to Friday. It was very simple, I rode as far as I felt comfortable and then got off and pushed the bike. As the days and weeks went by, I noticed that I was getting further and further up the hill before needing to get off. I even started to notice small landmarks to measure my progress. ...


4

No, the ideal is to keep up a constant high cadence rather than to apply maximum pressure. Gears were invented for just that reason. Explanation: Muscles work better and develop better under lower strain. The evacuation of waste (lactic acid) is blocked when the muscle is under higher load.


4

Wheelies aren't a strength thing, they are a function of weight distribution on the bike. If you move your weight far enough back the front wheel will lift - this can initially be assisted by applying a few hard pedal strokes in a light gear. As you correctly observed, rear suspension is a disadvantage here, as it absorbs some of your initial weight ...


4

Is the question about non-stop cycling or just riding over several days or weeks? For non-stop cycling it’s less about starvation and more about the maximum power you can get from burning body fat. For the Race Across America the record (without any food restrictions) is 27km/h average over 4860km in 7d 16h. Since stopping and sleeping is allowed (though ...


4

Most everyone else has concentrated on the physical and/or your bike, and rightly so. But the one thing I'd like to add is the mental side of riding hills. Here is the one thing I'd like you to keep in mind: You can do more than you think you can Try it next time you're going up that hill. Just as you're about to get off to walk, look about 20 feet ahead ...


4

The good news is that climbing is a great way to get fit! As Eddy Merckx said: "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." Listen to your body and get a feel for how hard you can push continuously, and what it feels like when you go above that (for example, I start feeling slightly nauseous). You can look up aerobic vs anaerobic to learn more about what happens.


4

The short answer is no, there is no standard equivalent for effort between distance and elevation. Of course, as others have mentioned, they are connected by the amount of effort you put in. But as you ride faster on the flat, the power required to drive you along rises as the square (some say the cube) of your speed. So riding 10% faster takes 20% to 30% ...


3

It really depends on speed. If you go slow (and there is no headwind) then riding on the flat is almost effortless (rolling friction is a very small factor with properly-inflated road tires). What slows you on the flat is wind resistance, and the faster you go the more wind resistance you face. On the other hand, climbing a hill of a given height consumes ...


3

One thing I haven't seen mentioned is that climbing is not just about legs. Your upper body plays a large part in the process. Personally, I feel like it is 50% legs, and 50% arms and core. I can't back that up with any studies, but I believe it to be true. Your upper body does a lot of work stabilizing the bike and providing the leverage your legs need to ...


3

Something that can help is called your "stroke". A novice is inclined to push straight down on the pedal ... and then, straight down on the other pedal ... so that you're pushing down, and then pushing down. A more experienced rider has a more continuous "cycle": Push the pedal forward when it's at the top (i.e. at "12 o'clock") Push the pedal down when ...


3

There are many good replies here. Read them a few times and consider carefully what everyone is saying. Based on my experience-- I totally lacked any fitness when I began to ride again as a middle-aged adult-- the hill you're trying to ride is a little ambitious, if you're carrying a few extra pounds and your fitness has not been developed sufficiently. ...


3

My problem was always going off too quickly to begin with. Don't watch the pros to begin with. My tip is to go real slow. Get the lowest gear and just plod along. You can do almost any climb if you do it slow enough. Once you've done it slow to prove to yourself the hill can be beaten, repeat, but pick up the tempo as the top is in sight. As you improve, ...


3

This largely depends on rider goals and finances. Your example clearly highlights the advantage of a light bike (although aero is probably equally important). If Joe and Billy are racing, and they are exactly the same, we can assume Billy is going to win. If Joe can afford it, and wants to stay competitive with Billy, it will likely be worth it for him. ...


3

I want a bike that will allow to me ride on the road and on the rough trails I guess we can't be sure what you mean by "rough trails", but if you're talking about what I call "rough trails", a CX bike just isn't going to do it. i don't want the relaxed geometry. I want to go fast. Relaxed geometry and high speed often go together off-road (think DH ...


2

The best thing to do is go try out as many bikes as you can & see what you like!! You can probably do 20 miles or so in two hours, depending on how hard you ride. As far as being concerned about the gears adding complication, although there is a learning curve to figure out what gear to use when, a quality bike should shift easily & smoothly with ...


2

You mentioned wanting to loose weight, that's one of my projects too. There is some interesting research out there suggesting that the problem of loosing weight is more than just "making output exceed input." You might take a look at Grant Peterson's book Just Ride, it is a collection of short essays on practical biking and includes a good section on health ...


2

Your bikes gearing might not be ideal for you. Your bike will be like most and have a large overlap. The size of the cogs is what is most important here. If after a few rides you are not seeing improvement, think about getting the bike setup with lower gearing. Its often an easy job (But can get expensive depending on all sorts of things) and does not cost ...


2

I'm 40, and have back and joint issues that make getting up in the morning hard work. If I get-up-and-go its terrible for the first half-hour. So here's what helps me: Full flexion of joints. That means pushing your limbs to the ir comfortable maximum extensions then holding for a few seconds, then a little further. Nothing rough. A hot shower - where ...



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