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31

I agree with the comments that 9 miles is a not a short ride for somebody not in shape, but you’ll get in shape for it really fast, so you should go for it. Just get ready to be sore in funny places for a couple weeks. You can make your situation better by doing a few things: Buy a road bike instead, assuming you’ll be on pavement. At the very least, ...


26

The gearing of your bike seems reasonable, the 26 front/34 rear combination will (eventually) make climbing hills easy. But till then… Before you do anything else, take @cherouvim's advice and make sure you seat is at a reasonable height. It should be high enough that if you place a heel on the low pedal your leg is almost fully extended (just short of ...


16

You cannot outride (or outrun or out-any-other-exercise) a bad diet. On top of that, decades of research shows it's impossible to "spot-reduce". Your options are: Eat some combination of food that results in fewer calories in. Shoot for somewhere between 200-500 fewer calories for moderate weight loss. Ride some combination of harder and longer while ...


12

If you are riding near your aerobic limit you'll definitely discover that you've lost aerobic capacity during the next 12-24 hours. It can take that long to replace the red blood cells you've lost. Since a blood donation is about 10% of your blood capacity, your aerobic capacity will be down by 10% I wrote the rest of this before I saw your comment that ...


11

I've cycled 15km (or 9.3 miles) to work for over 2 years. You'll get used to it very fast. I can reiterate what @tim.farkas is saying about that wearing a backpack will get old fast. I've bolted a big plastik box onto my bike rack to put my backpack in. It was very relieving to cycle without anything on your back. Take your time in the beginning and cycle ...


11

Just keep on doing the same route and you'll see progress very fast. Also this will soon not be true: It's not so fun on the way back though Some tips to make it: make sure that the tyres are inflated correctly make sure your drivetrain runs smooth and the chain is lubed make sure your seat height is correct (ask your LBS if unsure) conserve energy ...


10

Wait a little before you buy a new saddle. It takes some time for both your butt and the saddle to adjust to each other. Wider and softer saddles are only more comfortable for shorter rides or very upright riding positions. 17 km and 50 minutes are a very good point to start. Depending on your time constraints and where you live you can either do longer ...


9

If you really want to measure how much effort you're putting in, you should look into getting a power meter. It measures the actual wattage you output, and can therefore be used to calculate total energy output. However, they are quite expensive. The other option is to get a heart rate monitor along with cadence and speed meters which together can give you ...


8

There are no shortcuts, it's about building the legs, and lungs, and body. There may be some factors that could make it a little easier, but the main factor is getting strong enough, which takes some time and some dedication. Starting in the easiest gear may not be the best choice as it can make a climb seem endless. Try to get into the hill at good speed, ...


7

Biking is an easy activity to throttle. Start slow and take breaks along the way if necessary. Also take days off when you feel fatigued or sore. Make sure you hydrate.


7

Riding at 30kph average for 3 hours, in a hilly area is a solid effort. Assuming your pack riding skills are sufficient, you will also likely do fine in in a club ride that averages 30-40kph (but see the pack riding primer below). Club rides will have a faster pace than what you are riding now, but you will also be working a lot less (about 30% less) at any ...


7

Everything is relative. For 99% of the population 30kph for 3 hours would be amazing. For a male A grade club rider it would be an off day. For a female A grade club rider it's not bad for a solo training ride. About bunches Sometimes an ad hoc bunch forms in a popular road. These can be dangerous - you don't know the experience level of these people, ...


7

Depends on exercise intensity. In a day or two you can return to your normal/moderate exercise. A complete recovery of oxygen delivery can take as much as 3/4 weeks. This means a professional athlete should be careful because he will loose performance, but us normal human beings can carry our normal daily lives. You can read more complete answerers given ...


6

You already have some good, helpful answers. Well done for sticking at that hill! Make sure you're riding on slick tires, and have them pumped up pretty hard. Soft, wide tires would rob much of your effort. Regarding the hill. There are several things involved in sustained climbing Technique. Do you rush at it the bottom? Or do you try to just settle to ...


6

The bike can do it, and so can you, though maybe not yet. My old commute had a 20-25% hill on it, and my bottom gear was 28x32 on 700x35 tyres. It took a few goes before I could ride up it without stopping. It wasn't as long as yours but the total climb was probably similar. Take it easy, you don't want to be breathing hard on approach (a slightly ...


5

Consider an electric bike. My situation was similar, 15km is just about 9 miles and while I'm not a "big fat slob" I'm not super-fit either. I could do it on a moderate quality touring bike in 45 minutes but I got to work soaked in sweat. Taking a (dare I mention it) cigarette-pause around kilometer 10, and cycling gently, I took 55 minutes but didn't offend ...


5

A few simple tips: Whether it's cycling, running or any other physical activity the more gradually you build up your mileage, the better off you'll be in the long run. A good rule of thumb is don't increase your time or mileage by more than 10% a week. Carrying on a conversation with someone should be difficult but not impossible. If you can't carry on a ...


5

(1) Go Slow and Go Easy On Yourself. Climbing hills is supposed to be hard! You are carrying 250 lbs (you, bike, your stuff) 264 feet straight up over that mile. I was riding once with a guy who has a PowerTap hub (a $500 toy for bike nerds and pro athletes that reports energy expenditure on your bike computer), and he said the main thing he had learned ...


5

I had this problem some years ago. I commuted to work Monday to Friday. It was very simple, I rode as far as I felt comfortable and then got off and pushed the bike. As the days and weeks went by, I noticed that I was getting further and further up the hill before needing to get off. I even started to notice small landmarks to measure my progress. ...


4

The good news is that climbing is a great way to get fit! As Eddy Merckx said: "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." Listen to your body and get a feel for how hard you can push continuously, and what it feels like when you go above that (for example, I start feeling slightly nauseous). You can look up aerobic vs anaerobic to learn more about what happens. ...


4

Most everyone else has concentrated on the physical and/or your bike, and rightly so. But the one thing I'd like to add is the mental side of riding hills. Here is the one thing I'd like you to keep in mind: You can do more than you think you can Try it next time you're going up that hill. Just as you're about to get off to walk, look about 20 feet ahead ...


3

An 80kg person who rides vigorously for an hour burns about 2600kj of energy. There is 37000kj in 1kg of fat, which is equivalent to the energy spent over 14 hours of vigorous riding. However, depending on the intensity, much of this energy will come from glucose in the muscles, so to burn 1kg of fat it might take 2 - 3 times longer. Say 28 to 42 hours of ...


3

I had the exact same issue. I was on a swim team and biking to work every day, but staying the same weight. It changed when I started replacing carbs and sugars in my diet with fiber, protein and fat. This meant eggs instead of cereal or toast at breakfast, a big salad instead of a sandwich at lunch, and avoiding pasta, pizza and tortillas at dinner. It ...


3

17km/10miles under 1 hour is not so bad for beginner. The best way to improve your stamina is to have constant speed in a long run. You don't have to push yourself too hard and going flatland is good but picking a distance with some kind of small uphill and downhill is better for you. It will build your muscle dynamically. Try to go a little faster and ...


3

For AM and FR style riding, a strong upper torso is a huge improvement. Like your lower body, you want a lot of it to be endurance as well as strength. Keeping the front end straight and using your arms like shock absorbers as much as your legs will eventually take it's toll. I have been on many a mountain bike ride in the spring after hours of snow ...


3

I been making 5 miles from home to work for a year and this are a few advices by myself. Try to make a first ride of recognition when you don't have to worry about time, maybe the weekend. In this ride you have to pay attention to bumps, holes, car's crosses and transit signals in the road and if there is places for fix your bike in case of something ...


3

From years of experience, I have found that riding with your upper body (arms/ chest / back) flexed, you will get a significantly better upper body work out than with your upper body relaxed, where you don't get any work out. If your riding on rough terrain try to jump and wheelie your front tire over objects here and there; if your riding on the street, try ...


3

The short answer is no, there is no standard equivalent for effort between distance and elevation. Of course, as others have mentioned, they are connected by the amount of effort you put in. But as you ride faster on the flat, the power required to drive you along rises as the square (some say the cube) of your speed. So riding 10% faster takes 20% to 30% ...


2

Four factors I can think of bike tires riding style conditioning If the bicycle has full suspension then less vibration. Carbon frame will absorb vibration. The fit of the bike is a huge factor. Larger tires at lower pressure will absorb vibration. Can run tubeless tires at lower pressure. If you are running smaller tires then go to a bigger ...


2

I come to this question as (in chronological order) a speed skater, cyclist, and runner. I have been a full-time Data Whore since early 2007. I have used various Garmin devices and smartphones. What I have found works best is the device that is on your person, with a sufficiently charged battery, and actually recording data. I spent five years using a ...



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