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30

I agree with the comments that 9 miles is a not a short ride for somebody not in shape, but you’ll get in shape for it really fast, so you should go for it. Just get ready to be sore in funny places for a couple weeks. You can make your situation better by doing a few things: Buy a road bike instead, assuming you’ll be on pavement. At the very least, ...


11

I've cycled 15km (or 9.3 miles) to work for over 2 years. You'll get used to it very fast. I can reiterate what @tim.farkas is saying about that wearing a backpack will get old fast. I've bolted a big plastik box onto my bike rack to put my backpack in. It was very relieving to cycle without anything on your back. Take your time in the beginning and cycle ...


7

Biking is an easy activity to throttle. Start slow and take breaks along the way if necessary. Also take days off when you feel fatigued or sore. Make sure you hydrate.


4

Consider an electric bike. My situation was similar, 15km is just about 9 miles and while I'm not a "big fat slob" I'm not super-fit either. I could do it on a moderate quality touring bike in 45 minutes but I got to work soaked in sweat. Taking a (dare I mention it) cigarette-pause around kilometer 10, and cycling gently, I took 55 minutes but didn't offend ...


4

Whichever type you will ride the most. If you like to go off road, get a mountain bike. If you plan to stay on the roads, then a road bike or hybrid will work well. Make sure the bike fits you well and is comfortable. Make sure it is a good quality bike that won't break after 1000 km. A bike that's sitting in your garage because you don't like it or because ...


3

From years of experience, I have found that riding with your upper body (arms/ chest / back) flexed, you will get a significantly better upper body work out than with your upper body relaxed, where you don't get any work out. If your riding on rough terrain try to jump and wheelie your front tire over objects here and there; if your riding on the street, try ...


2

Four factors I can think of bike tires riding style conditioning If the bicycle has full suspension then less vibration. Carbon frame will absorb vibration. The fit of the bike is a huge factor. Larger tires at lower pressure will absorb vibration. Can run tubeless tires at lower pressure. If you are running smaller tires then go to a bigger ...


2

I come to this question as (in chronological order) a speed skater, cyclist, and runner. I have been a full-time Data Whore since early 2007. I have used various Garmin devices and smartphones. What I have found works best is the device that is on your person, with a sufficiently charged battery, and actually recording data. I spent five years using a ...


2

I been making 5 miles from home to work for a year and this are a few advices by myself. Try to make a first ride of recognition when you don't have to worry about time, maybe the weekend. In this ride you have to pay attention to bumps, holes, car's crosses and transit signals in the road and if there is places for fix your bike in case of something ...


1

First of all I'd like to congratulate you, you've already done perhaps the hardest part, deciding to cycle to work. Its going to be tough, but I'm sure you can manage, and its well worth it. I'm going to go through some concerns that others haven't brought up. You will want to get the fastest bike you can get. You want a road bike or a cyclocross bike. ...


1

I'd go smartphone based. Most of the apps have a free version to try out. The accuracy of most trackers whether phone based or not isn't great at a realistic price. Even then some effort may be needed in the tracking (changing load carried). If you're not talking about a training tracker but just to record calories burnt for a range of manually selected ...


1

I can't really give you an overview of the market, but I can list a couple of devices that I've got, or my wife has, to give you an idea of what is around. But I'll say straight off that this might be limited value to you. First there is the Garmin Edge. This is ideal for measuring cycling data - you have external sensors such as heart rate monitor, speed, ...


1

The short answer is "No". Intermittent fasting is not all about weight loss, although it can help with that, apparently without compromising performance. There's research showing that this approach can increase the effect of training, in particular VO2 Max, which is often of interest to cyclists. For example Adaptations to skeletal muscle with endurance ...


1

I fit in to that weight category and I ride a Trek superfly 100Al dual suspension bike. I do ride it hard and even being the biggest bloke in the group that I ride with, I can out ride most of the lighter blokes. I ride the bike hard and unfortunately I do regularly break things. I have re-spoked the rear wheel with heavy duty spokes after breaking too many ...



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