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10

No - Struggling away in the small rear cog/large front chainring combo is bad. Fitness is an overall term that has many components, so: If you want power you need to work on intervals, which is as fast as possible at full power for short burst times, then recovery time at a middling state. If you want to train for endurance, being at the steady state for ...


8

You have a specific training question that your coach ought to be able to answer for you, and I will not address that here. A larger general issue is one that I will address, since it is of wider interest. Your general concern is that you won't be able to simulate race conditions in training, especially long steady output. However, speed is determined by ...


7

The physics model of cycling power and speed has been validated in the real world. Two examples are this and this. The model embedded in Analyticcyling.com's online calculator is based on these two papers. Whether the amount of difference calculated by the validated models is worth it to Joe and Billy is a question that can't be answered by the physics.


4

Is the question about non-stop cycling or just riding over several days or weeks? For non-stop cycling it’s less about starvation and more about the maximum power you can get from burning body fat. For the Race Across America the record (without any food restrictions) is 27km/h average over 4860km in 7d 16h. Since stopping and sleeping is allowed (though ...


4

No, the ideal is to keep up a constant high cadence rather than to apply maximum pressure. Gears were invented for just that reason. Explanation: Muscles work better and develop better under lower strain. The evacuation of waste (lactic acid) is blocked when the muscle is under higher load.


4

Wheelies aren't a strength thing, they are a function of weight distribution on the bike. If you move your weight far enough back the front wheel will lift - this can initially be assisted by applying a few hard pedal strokes in a light gear. As you correctly observed, rear suspension is a disadvantage here, as it absorbs some of your initial weight ...


3

This largely depends on rider goals and finances. Your example clearly highlights the advantage of a light bike (although aero is probably equally important). If Joe and Billy are racing, and they are exactly the same, we can assume Billy is going to win. If Joe can afford it, and wants to stay competitive with Billy, it will likely be worth it for him. ...


3

A perfectly reasonable question. Cycling is gererally thought of as being an excellent way of keeping fit. It is seen as beneficial for cardio- health and for leg muscles (not so much for arms), and is low-impact on joints. On top of that I would add that the benefits are proportional to the amount of effort you put into it. Of course, how safe this ...


3

I want a bike that will allow to me ride on the road and on the rough trails I guess we can't be sure what you mean by "rough trails", but if you're talking about what I call "rough trails", a CX bike just isn't going to do it. i don't want the relaxed geometry. I want to go fast. Relaxed geometry and high speed often go together off-road (think DH ...


2

The best thing to do is go try out as many bikes as you can & see what you like!! You can probably do 20 miles or so in two hours, depending on how hard you ride. As far as being concerned about the gears adding complication, although there is a learning curve to figure out what gear to use when, a quality bike should shift easily & smoothly with ...


2

In general, when we become "stuck" at a given performance level, the key is to take a different training approach. As a statement of the obvious, what you're doing isn't giving the results you want so something's got to change. I suspect that you are over training. While you and many others would see the distances you're riding as quite low, the inability ...


2

I'm 40, and have back and joint issues that make getting up in the morning hard work. If I get-up-and-go its terrible for the first half-hour. So here's what helps me: Full flexion of joints. That means pushing your limbs to the ir comfortable maximum extensions then holding for a few seconds, then a little further. Nothing rough. A hot shower - where ...


1

This is a sticky one to tackle. Firstly, we don't know the terrain you're riding in, we don't know if you're going to commute to work/school/college/university and we don't even know exactly what your budget would be. As for a Single-Speed, why specifically? You could lose weight on a road racer or a mountain bike, or even a BMX. Anyhow, if your budget is ...


1

If you want to use your own figures from strava or some other program you can easily get get a feeling for the relative effort between biking a certain distance on the flat and on a grade. Use this calculator....http://bikecalculator.com/ For example I have a 2 mile hill at 5% which my best average speed is 9.3 mph. Entering the data gives me a calorie ...


1

You need to develop your core as well as arms, so that's weights. Don't forget your lower back as well - an area cyclists need stability, which comes from strength and endurance. Handgrip exercises are good too.



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