Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Since cycling is primarily based on leg strength, which is derived from all parts of the leg (including the glutes or butt muscles), then yes. Here's a great graphic that shows some of the muscles used during a typical pedal stroke: And basic anatomy tells us that the muscular system works together so it's virtually impossible to train one muscle ...


4

Whichever type you will ride the most. If you like to go off road, get a mountain bike. If you plan to stay on the roads, then a road bike or hybrid will work well. Make sure the bike fits you well and is comfortable. Make sure it is a good quality bike that won't break after 1000 km. A bike that's sitting in your garage because you don't like it or because ...


3

I feel a little painful... If it pains because of seating on an improper seat then no, it will not tighten it. If it pains due to miles of cycling together with standing pedaling uphill, then probably yes.


2

Four factors I can think of bike tires riding style conditioning If the bicycle has full suspension then less vibration. Carbon frame will absorb vibration. The fit of the bike is a huge factor. Larger tires at lower pressure will absorb vibration. Can run tubeless tires at lower pressure. If you are running smaller tires then go to a bigger ...


1

I would suggest a two fold approach! Firstly ride your bike in a fat burning zone. Your going to need to have a relatively low body fat percentage if you want to have decent muscle definition. So I'd take the long route into work! The second phase is once you arrive at work jump off your bike and do some sit-ups, once your strong enough you could use your ...


1

What most people mean by developing their abs is that they want their abdominal muscles to show through their skin, commonly referred to as a six pack. While you probably wont engage your abdominals in cycling very much, cycling as an endurance activity will increase your caloric needs and make it easier for you to reduce the amount of body fat covering ...


1

The short answer is "No". Intermittent fasting is not all about weight loss, although it can help with that, apparently without compromising performance. There's research showing that this approach can increase the effect of training, in particular VO2 Max, which is often of interest to cyclists. For example Adaptations to skeletal muscle with endurance ...


1

I fit in to that weight category and I ride a Trek superfly 100Al dual suspension bike. I do ride it hard and even being the biggest bloke in the group that I ride with, I can out ride most of the lighter blokes. I ride the bike hard and unfortunately I do regularly break things. I have re-spoked the rear wheel with heavy duty spokes after breaking too many ...


1

I'm a heavier rider (250-260) and the first thing I do when I purchase a new mounain bike is invest a good chunk of change into better front and rear rims. In this day and age, the stock rims are pretty weak and tend to break first in the spokes. It's also not uncommon to have a bent rim when going off a curb. I should also note that I punish my bikes ...


1

Being 240 LBs and now being on my third bike I thought I would throw this in. I destroyed a department store bike in 3 months of commuting on roads. It started failing after a month. Don't touch these unless bike security is a problem. I replaced this with a $1000 MTB. Within a year the entry level shocks had gone even though I was only commuting. I would ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible