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3

The short answer is no, there is no standard equivalent for effort between distance and elevation. Of course, as others have mentioned, they are connected by the amount of effort you put in. But as you ride faster on the flat, the power required to drive you along rises as the square (some say the cube) of your speed. So riding 10% faster takes 20% to 30% ...


2

It really depends on speed. If you go slow (and there is no headwind) then riding on the flat is almost effortless (rolling friction is a very small factor with properly-inflated road tires). What slows you on the flat is wind resistance, and the faster you go the more wind resistance you face. On the other hand, climbing a hill of a given height consumes ...


1

It depends on other factors as well. A big one is speed. When you climb a hill, there is a minimum energy expenditure to get up the hill. On the flat, there is almost no minimum, but riding 10 mph is much easier than 15 mph (or whatever range of speeds is suitable for you). If you climb hills fast, you will get tired quickly. Elevation gain can be ...


9

If you really want to measure how much effort you're putting in, you should look into getting a power meter. It measures the actual wattage you output, and can therefore be used to calculate total energy output. However, they are quite expensive. The other option is to get a heart rate monitor along with cadence and speed meters which together can give you ...


2

You mentioned wanting to loose weight, that's one of my projects too. There is some interesting research out there suggesting that the problem of loosing weight is more than just "making output exceed input." You might take a look at Grant Peterson's book Just Ride, it is a collection of short essays on practical biking and includes a good section on health ...


5

A few simple tips: Whether it's cycling, running or any other physical activity the more gradually you build up your mileage, the better off you'll be in the long run. A good rule of thumb is don't increase your time or mileage by more than 10% a week. Carrying on a conversation with someone should be difficult but not impossible. If you can't carry on a ...


3

17km/10miles under 1 hour is not so bad for beginner. The best way to improve your stamina is to have constant speed in a long run. You don't have to push yourself too hard and going flatland is good but picking a distance with some kind of small uphill and downhill is better for you. It will build your muscle dynamically. Try to go a little faster and ...


2

Heart rate is a better indicator to see if you're working too hard. There is a very good book call Fitness Cycling I used that gives you recommended training schemes from beginner to amateur racing. When I read it and followed it what surprised me most was that most of the cycling should be done for long distances but not doing much work. It does rely on ...


10

Wait a little before you buy a new saddle. It takes some time for both your butt and the saddle to adjust to each other. Wider and softer saddles are only more comfortable for shorter rides or very upright riding positions. 17 km and 50 minutes are a very good point to start. Depending on your time constraints and where you live you can either do longer ...


1

I'd say you could go with HIIT (high intensity intervals) on a treadmill. For example a particular training I like and find helpful is: 6-8 sets of: 1 minute very fast (18km/h for me) 1 minute middle speed (12km/h in my case) 1 minute slow (8-9 km/h) and no stops in between. That's a very good yet pretty hard training. Do not more than twice a week.


0

When you exercise your muscles burn two fuels; a) fat b) glycogen Glycogen is carbohydrate stored in the muscles. Glycogen is quick and easy to metabolise, fat is slow and hard. Your body burns these fuels at different rates depending on how intensely you are working. At a low heart rate you burn more fat than glycogen. At high heart rate you start burning ...


3

An 80kg person who rides vigorously for an hour burns about 2600kj of energy. There is 37000kj in 1kg of fat, which is equivalent to the energy spent over 14 hours of vigorous riding. However, depending on the intensity, much of this energy will come from glucose in the muscles, so to burn 1kg of fat it might take 2 - 3 times longer. Say 28 to 42 hours of ...


3

I had the exact same issue. I was on a swim team and biking to work every day, but staying the same weight. It changed when I started replacing carbs and sugars in my diet with fiber, protein and fat. This meant eggs instead of cereal or toast at breakfast, a big salad instead of a sandwich at lunch, and avoiding pasta, pizza and tortillas at dinner. It ...


0

what worked for me was serious, hard, (90 to 100% ) maximum heart rate interval rides. any good cycling training book can give you more specifics. they only need to be done 2/3 days a week. the other days you can ride in a more relaxed/recovery ride type of way. a lot will depend on how hard you are riding presently, if your heart rate isn't high enough, you ...


16

You cannot outride (or outrun or out-any-other-exercise) a bad diet. On top of that, decades of research shows it's impossible to "spot-reduce". Your options are: Eat some combination of food that results in fewer calories in. Shoot for somewhere between 200-500 fewer calories for moderate weight loss. Ride some combination of harder and longer while ...


0

Since you already have a great base, I think you will see the most benefit from doing some high intensity intervals and some moderate intensity hill repeats. Just remember to taper way down and don't do anything too intense in the week before your trip!


0

Appart from training you should make sure that you have enough easy gears available. Being able to pedal (relatively) easy with high cadence does make a lot of difference, both in efficiency and endurance. If your gears allow you to do that then I also don’t think that there is much specialiced training you can/should do for climbing. Using something like ...



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