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1

Just to add to the other answers, it is my experience that you can't get as secure a fit with a QR skewer as with a nutted axle. If your bike has track forks (like below), rather than forward facing horizontal dropouts, you can probably get away with this, especially by adding a chain tug to keep the wheel from sliding forward in the rear fork end. If ...


4

They come with bolts because QR's typcially don't clamp with enough force to keep the wheel from slipping forward. It looks like you have rear facing dropouts, so you should easily be able to use QR's if you get yourself a Surly Tuggnut. That little circle on the side of it is a QR adapter. You just pop it in and then slide your skewer all the way ...


0

You could avoid interfering with your wheel fastening solution by mounting the guards using P-clips on the seat stays.


1

Please note that since those fenders are mounted on the outer side of the frame, your skewers are tightened against the fender brackets instead of tightened directly against the frame. Therefore the skewer's nut splines and material are not the only thing to look at. You could of course get a pair of those anti-theft-skewers that you tighten with a wrench to ...


2

I've always used a quick release for the front of my fixed gear bike, I've only ever used the bolts on the back. His highness Sir Sheldon Brown says you should be okay to use a quick release with an enclosed cam ( not an exposed cam ) with an acorn nut that has steel teeth ( not aluminum teeth ). http://sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html disclaimer: there's no ...


1

With the horizontal dropout the axle can shift. You pretty much need the nuts to get a tight enough grip. But I suspect people have used quick release on a single speed. So Sheldon states an enclosed cam is good enough - not good enough for me. I am not buying the historical reasons as I see new bikes with nutted horizontal dropout and still QR on the ...



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