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19

Some folding bikes are quite good for long distances. Unfortunately, most of them seem to be optimized for short hops, by design (or by the fact of their design limitations). You're correct in thinking that more expensive folding bikes can be much easier to ride, where the money is going for stuff like custom configuration or (even a custom-built frame). ...


14

Yes, I've used a variety of folding pedals on my Dahon and Brompton and they're all a bit flexy. I've had plastic ones snap in half on me (and yes, that can be very painful/dangerous). The best ones I've had were all-metal ones in which the axle and folding pedal were both metal. But even those aren't as strong as fixed pedals -- and none of the folding ...


13

In my opinion, this should NOT be done. Bicycles are very versatile, and one can not only use a single all-purpose bike for many purposes, but also to have/design specialty bikes, as it is the case of a Strida. And, by the way, is the case with a lot of child-carrying specific bikes and/or equipment. But, as it seems to me, a Strida is a SPECIALTY BIKE NOT ...


12

My stable contains two folding bikes, and I love them both. I use them for different purposes. If this is going to be your only bike and you want to use that bike for cargo (with racks, etc), I recommend against using a folding bike unless it's one with larger wheels. Disadvantages of folders: For offroad riding, nothing beats a standard rigid-frame ...


11

If it's a pre-2012 steel folding pedal, it takes a 24mm socket. If it's titanium or a 2012 onwards steel pedal, it needs a 10mm allen key. See the options at listed at this SJS Cycles page.


10

To add to Michael's comment if it's your property you can't be forbid to bring a bicycle into your apartment, unless it's somehow unlawful to be in possession of said bicycle. Would you be forbid to bring a crank set or a pair of wheels or a bar set into your apartment? Why would you be forbid to bring those things assembled in a certain way into your ...


9

The Brompton owner's manual states: SECTION K: ROUTINE REPLACEMENTS. Planned replacement is advised to ensure both safety and good performance. The suggested intervals between replacements are for bicycles subjected to normal use: the most appropriate timing depends on the conditions of use and your riding style. ALUMINIUM COMPONENTS: as on ...


9

Auto-Mini folding bikes Auto-Mini folding bikes were made by Puch in Austria for various department stores. In North America, vendors included J.C. Penney, Montgomery-Ward, and Simpsons-Sears. (thebikeguy, 2007; Martin, 1996; Thomas, 2011b; cf. Bikeworks, c. 1998.) In my experience, the main-tube sticker always says "Auto-Mini" in huge type, with the word "...


9

Well, from an engineering standpoint, no. It increases complexity, cost and weight. Those might be a deal breaker for the commuters who would likely use them. From a practical standpoint, maybe. @NL_Derek; you could be the first to test one! In conjunction with other folding components (frame like a Dahon & pedals), it may suit the users need, imagine ...


8

A well-configured folding bike that is designed for long-distance riding should not be noticeably hard to ride. Possible issues: Poorly configured: Check the normal things: Are the tires properly inflated? Are brake pads rubbing? Are the wheels true? Is the chain properly lubricated? Are the bottom bracket spindle and axles free of play, not overtightened,...


7

Aluminum in general has a useful fatigue life of about 5 years. Which is why most manufacturers have started limiting frame warranties to 5 years. Fatigue Life data for 6061 alloy here. If your folder has been ridden regularly over the 7 years you've owned it, then consider replacing them. If it's been lightly used, or mostly garaged, then you're are ...


6

There no bike on the market that is very good at folding and also very good at “biking”! So you have to decide if you care most about the folding or how well it works as a bike. For a bike to fold into a small space it must have small wheels. Small wheels are never as good a ride as full sized wheels. The Brompton is consider to be one of the best ...


5

Get a Dahon Vitesse. This is the 7 speed model with aluminium frame. This is a personal recommendation as I have been riding mine for years, I bought it for one particularly tricky commute and have not stopped riding it since. Folding time is 10-20 seconds depending on urgency, I too am 6'3" which means it is easy to get the height right for the seat as that ...


5

Brompton is certainly a well known name in the bike industry. As such, I have faith in their ability to produce a quality folder. The £129.99 bike uses a design which is sub-optimal for a folder, since a single failure point has the option for the bike to collapse into the folded or partly folded position. Which is not to say it will fail, only that it ...


5

This is an interesting question, well suited to this site! The problem is a common one for touring cyclists wanting a 25-32mm tyre and mudguard, where the solution is to 'get a bike with cantilever bosses'. You have a compound problem of short reach, a measurement you could do with measuring. The dual-pivot brake doesn't offer a lot of tyre clearance, but ...


5

The best thing to do is make your own studded tires from the old tires you have. You can buy roofing nails for very cheap, and put lots of studs on the tire (most commercially available studded tires don't have that many studs). Push the nails through from the inside of the tire, wherever you want them. It's a good idea to put some on the rolling surface, ...


5

From your comments, it sounds like you're hoping to find a folding bike that folds up fast, but is also light enough to carry up stairs easily and small enough to fit through turnstiles and on the train with no problems. All for well under $1000. This may be impossible. There are cheap folding bikes (under $500) and there are lightweight ones that fold up ...


5

Larger wheels have lower effective rolling resistance. That is, they roll over obstacles more easily and smoothly because the larger diameter doesn't allow them to fall into gaps as easily. Which means on actual roads you'll roll more easily with a larger wheel. Everything else is much smaller differences. However, I think the angular momentum may work ...


5

As per an email from Brompton: ...the folding pedal needs a 24mm socket to remove unless it is a superlight bike, the titanium folding pedal bolt uses a 10mm hex. The right hand pedal uses a standard 15mm spanner.


5

First off you will need to have a think about what kind of riding you want to do. For roads you'll want a touring bike, and for off road, a mountain bike. The key differences are: Weight - riding rough trails and off road requires a strong frame. This will impact weight Suspension - again, this adds weight, but can be essential on really rough terrain ...


5

I'd recommend getting a cheap used aluminum frame bike (a beater), a good lock, and a bottle of oil. Then, I recommend you lock it on the street most of the time. I recommend cheap so that you won't worry about it while it's parked on the street. I recommend aluminum so that it is light enough to haul up to your apartment for those extended periods when ...


5

If you go with one of the bigger, more solid folding bikes you can use a standard child seat. With most smaller-folding bikes you'll run into weight limits even if you can get one to fit - they're often only rated for 90kg or so, which means that even a light 60kg adult and a 10kg child doesn't leave a lot of margin for "it wasn't designed for this" stresses....


5

If you're only using it for riding a bit around town, possibly using multi-modal train or bus connections (they are popular with London tube riders), small shopping trips, or commuting to work and you are not concerned about doing fast road rides, off road riding, or super long rides then a folding bike could be a good fit. I borrowed a folding bike and ...


5

In my experience, it seems fairly standard practice for the tenancy agreements supplied by agents to forbid the storage of bikes in properties. I have always just done so regardless, though I can understand why you might want to avoid clearly violating the terms of your agreement. I'm fairly sure that your landlord (unless they are live-in) is required to ...


5

Flying with a Brompton is typically dependent on the airport staff and flight crew, rather than airline policies and procedures. I've had success getting the bike on larger planes no problem, mostly because overhead compartments were very large, or because there was sufficient space to store the folded bike (with seat and pedals removed) with strollers and ...


4

I've commuted by bus + 12 km Strida every workday for about a year and a half now. Before my purchase, I researched the folding market thoroughly, and came to the conclusion that Strida was by far the best option. I've never regretted that decision, and even bought a Strida for my wife for casual riding (found one new on dba.dk for 2.250 DKK) due to my ...


4

The best advice I'm seeing here is to go to your bike shop and try out a few bikes. When you have a few test rides behind you, then you'll have a better idea of what questions to ask. What this boils down to: Test-ride a few bikes, buy one, have fun with it. Everything else is details. Bike types I'd concentrate my search on hybrids and hardtail ...


4

I've had a couple of non-folding mountain bikes on a sailboat for 5 years. I opted for smaller frame non-folding bikes for performance, and there is a hatch they barely fit through. Of course, rust is the major problem. Banging around in the waves and in the process of storing them is a potential problem. Because of this, there are no drink holders, ...



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