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-1

It depends on the design. I would say yes this is not that hard for someone with Engineering skills to accomplish. What I don't quite understand is why instead of having a pivot, don't they just make it with screw mounts so the ends of the handlebar can be pulled off? A safety latch could be placed on them to lock it to prevent accidentally loosening it ...


4

Running through a quick list of "engineering considerations" that I've just made up: costThese will cost more to design, test, manufacture and assemble at point of sale than conventional handlebars. They're more complex, so I can't see any way around the extra cost. The benefit seems to be slim outside of some fairly specialised scanarios, and for many of ...


9

Well, from an engineering standpoint, no. It increases complexity, cost and weight. Those might be a deal breaker for the commuters who would likely use them. From a practical standpoint, maybe. @NL_Derek; you could be the first to test one! In conjunction with other folding components (frame like a Dahon & pedals), it may suit the users need, imagine ...


2

Other posters have pointed out that it's vulnerable to catastrophic failure, so I wouldn't use it for my 60mph racer (if I had one !-). But for an everyday getting-from-A-to-B bike, it sounds like a great idea. I have often needed to loosen the handlebars to fit a disabled (flat tyre, lost key, etc.) bike into a car (using a handy stone if I don't have a ...


0

At first glance, these handlebars appear to be very dangerous. There are multiple points of failure any of which would immediately render the bike not only steerable but likely not allow the operator to brake either: If the center locking nut fails to secure the two halves of the handlebar or if it works its way loose by vibration Each half relies on the ...



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