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20

The single-legged fork must truly withstand heavier bending forces than conventional forks, simply due to physics and asymmetricity. But because of it's different construction, the fork is actually stiffer than most 2-legged. Pros The top is attached like a dual crown downhill fork, which is much stiffer than a single-crown. The wheel axle is one-piece ...


15

This fork setting exists so that the fork can be customized to your weight (major reason) and riding style (minor reason). It's simply the initial compression of the internal spring in the fork. The more it's compressed, the stiffer the fork will feel. Bigger preload compresses the spring more, and so it's best for heavier riders and/or people who ...


14

Depends on the fork and the brake type used. With disc brakes, don't do it. A disc can generate enough force to pull a wheel. That's why most, if not all new MTB forks come with a burly, deep recess for the QR and the dropouts face forward. With the caliper on the back of the leg, it wants to drive the hub downward when the brakes are on. If the dropout ...


13

Benefits of suspension forks (city/gravel road use): Remove chatter from bumpy roads Take the jar out of major bumps Better traction Drawbacks of suspension forks: Entire bike is heavier, leading to a less agile bike. A bike with suspension (all else being equal) will hit more holes and hit them harder. It will also climb like a pig and accelerate ...


12

Bouncyness* may not be the appropriate term for the behavior you need from your suspension. Suspension has two main functions: Shock Absorbing and Dampening. Shock absorbing is what the fork does by compressing, allowing the wheel to travel upwards. In this process, kinetic energy from the shock is used to compress either a coil spring or an air spring. ...


11

It depends on how the fork is engineered for safety. While its plausible that the curved shape does add to some shock absorption, that is determined by the width and construction of the fork tubing. You could design a fork which was reliable and curved in aluminum or carbon or whatever, but the engineering wouldn't be the same as a steel fork. Whether the ...


10

There are only a few measurements you need to be aware of when purchasing a new fork, particularly if you're avoiding suspension. If you don't need suspension, don't get it - it will only add cost and complexity, and a cheap suspension fork will be much worse than a rigid fork. The basic measurements you need to be aware of are: Headset type. Not truly ...


9

I don't think tire pressure should be set on how cushy you want your ride (unless you have no shocks). Tire pressure pressure and tread selection should be done based on how much traction you need. The trade off is that with more traction, you get a higher rolling resistance and you need to exert more energy to cover the same ground. This is why road bike ...


8

First thing you should do is read the tech sheet on your fork. I believe the link below is the correct one. http://www.cannondale.com/CMS/Technology/10_HeadShok_Tech_Pages_CUSA.pdf There are also a bunch of manuals here but I didn't see one for the DLR Ti. http://www.cannondale.com/usa/usaeng/Instructions As far as a rebuild goes it will be similar to ...


8

This is obviously (from the images) a suspension fork, and a very low-end one. Suspension forks are heavier than their rigid counterparts, but the trade-off is that they absorb shocks. These rust spots MUST MEAN the fork has long ago COMPLETELY LOST its ability to work properly as a suspension. As a result, you are carrying useless extra-weight, are not ...


8

I would get a fork with a steerer that fits the frame. The expense and risk of modifying your existing fork won't be worth it. There were some mountain bike forks with replacement steerer tubes but they didn't allow for changes of size or type of steerer. They were 1 1/8" threadless and so was the replacement. You also want to match the fork rake/angle that ...


8

On steel forks the tiny holes at the bottom end of the fork-blade are vent holes for the brazing process. The brazing produces fumes the fumes and the heat expands the air in the blade which makes that these holes are needed to evacuate both. On steel frames you may find similar holes in the seat-stays and in the chain-stays where they are usually close to ...


8

These are moisture drain holes. Moisture can condense and build up inside frames and cause rusting (in steel frames) or delamination (in carbon fiber). The drain holes allow for the built up moisture to drip off.


7

I would consider looking at a used later model bike.The improvements made in the last 18 years are worth the money.A decent fork can run hundreds of dollars not including installation. Check with your local bike shop for used bikes or craigs list if you keep it local so you can see before you buy.Bikepedia is a good reference to make sure you have an idea ...


7

My thinking is that it is a brazed on guide for dynamo hub wiring. A touring bike like the Devinci Caribou would likely have provisions for things like dynamo lighting (I think that it'd be more likey that this was the case than someone erroneously adding a disc brake cable guide on a non-disc fork.) Typical braze-ons look like this: As you can see there ...


7

Throw that thing out and get a rigid fork. You don't need suspension unless you're riding off-road, or jumping over cars, or whatever it is the kids do these days. And bad suspension is worse than no suspension. Rigid forks are pretty durable, so you may be able to find up a used one. Make sure that the crown-to-axle distance is similar to what you have ...


7

It sounds like you've sorted out the first issue, headset size. You'll need something with a 1 1/8" (also seen as 1.125" or 9/8") steerer. Your bicycle's handling is based on the geometry. Changing the axle-to-crown distance will change the angle of your head tube, altering your bicycle's handling significantly. The other major characteristic of a fork ...


7

I'm going to recommend that you NOT do this. There were in the past manufacturers of 1" steerer suspension forks - though I'm not certain that they're are still sold. It is important to note that bicycle frames built to accept solid steel forks have different geometry than those built for suspension forks. The frame is designed for a fork that doesn't have ...


7

Proviso - my advise presumes you are not looking at forking out $2K or more for a bike, and probably significantly less. At a high price point I might suggest suspension. I also presume the gravel section is well maintained with average (pea - grape) size gravel (Where I ride, we sometime use logging roads, the "gravel" is stones about 2"-3" across.), and ...


7

how does a higher fork contribute to higher stress in the frame? By creating a longer lever, and stretching the end of that lever to a greater angle, it transmits more force to the bottom of the head tube (the part of the frame where the steer tube passes through). This can cause damage to the head tube itself or where it joins both the down tube and ...


7

You will not damage a suspension fork by hanging it upside down. Although the fork is air sprung it also uses oil for dampening in one of the legs. Oil may leak if your seals are degraded. The seals in suspension forks are made to ensure they don't react with the suspension oil. The oil will actually help lubricate the seals. This is the same for coil ...


6

One of the main problems with converting an old bike is the width of the headset. Old rigid mountain bikes[1] commonly have a 1" headset while modern suspension bikes have a 1 1/8" diameter headset. Suspension forks are mostly for 1 1/8" headsets so fitting suspension to an old rigid mountain bike is normally a non starter for that simple reason. The ...


6

Anytime the fork bob is robbing you of power. That can include flats, sprints, climbing... Best advice is probably to try it out on all the terrains you ride and decide where it works and where it doesn't.


6

The real issue is in the top tube length. Basically, for shorter riders you need to move the handlebars closer to the seat. But then you have to deal with the wheel possibly colliding with the pedals ("toe strike"), changing the head angle or the fork's rake, which compromises the handling, and/or having a proportionally longer top tube than would ...


6

@ttarchala's answer is awesome. But I thought I could provide a bit more info for anyone else looking for info. -- On a coil fork (fork with a spring inside), there are two ways to adjust preload. First off you should get a spring that is the right tension for your weight. For Rockshox forks there are 6 or 7 different spring tensions that are designed ...


6

The technical term is "threaded fork". That is, the steering tube has threads on top for the headset to screw onto. The newer design is called "threadless" - that's the one where the stem clamps onto the steering tube with pinch bolts. You can switch from one to the other as long as the diameter of the steering tube is the same. (You'll obviously have to ...


6

You can purchase suspension-corrected rigid forks which are designed to work with the geometry that suspended frames offer (Essentially the axle-crown measurement places the head tube where it needs to be. Pretty simple.) There are a few manufacturers out there, but my favorite is Surly (in terms of quality and in value. They offer several forks for 26"-29" ...


6

This is your stem. As you can see, it is the whole unit from the bars to the top of the fork, including the adjustable bit in the middle. Most dan't have this and I think this is where the confusion is coming from. To remove your bars for packing, it is usual to remove the 4 bolts on the face plate on the stem. That is the part immediately touching the ...


6

It's not clear what is actually bent. From your picture, it is obvious what isn't bent: your fork is perfectly straight from the crown down to the drop outs. Also, the boot which covers the stanchion seems to be quite suggestively aligned with the fork; the bend seems to occur at the top of the boot, just before the head tube. If so, then it is in fact the ...



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