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14

Depends on the fork and the brake type used. With disc brakes, don't do it. A disc can generate enough force to pull a wheel. That's why most, if not all new mtb forks come with a bruly, deep recession for the QR and the droupouts face forward. With the caliper on the back of the leg, it wants to drive the hub downward when the brakes are on. If the ...


9

There are only a few measurements you need to be aware of when purchasing a new fork, particularly if you're avoiding suspension. If you don't need suspension, don't get it - it will only add cost and complexity, and a cheap suspension fork will be much worse than a rigid fork. The basic measurements you need to be aware of are: Headset type. Not truly ...


8

First thing you should do is read the tech sheet on your fork. I believe the link below is the correct one. http://www.cannondale.com/CMS/Technology/10_HeadShok_Tech_Pages_CUSA.pdf There are also a bunch of manuals here but I didn't see one for the DLR Ti. http://www.cannondale.com/usa/usaeng/Instructions As far as a rebuild goes it will be similar to ...


8

This fork setting exists so that the fork can be customized to your weight (major reason) and riding style (minor reason). It's simply the initial compression of the internal spring in the fork. The more it's compressed, the stiffer the fork will feel. Bigger preload compresses the spring more, and so it's best for heavier riders and/or people who ...


8

This is obviously (from the images) a suspension fork, and a very low-end one. Suspension forks are heavier than their rigid counterparts, but the trade-off is that they absorb shocks. These rust spots MUST MEAN the fork has long ago COMPLETELY LOST its ability to work properly as a suspension. As a result, you are carrying useless extra-weight, are not ...


8

I would get a fork with a steerer that fits the frame. The expense and risk of modifying your existing fork won't be worth it. There were some mountain bike forks with replacement steerer tubes but they didn't allow for changes of size or type of steerer. They were 1 1/8" threadless and so was the replacement. You also want to match the fork rake/angle that ...


7

Throw that thing out and get a rigid fork. You don't need suspension unless you're riding off-road, or jumping over cars, or whatever it is the kids do these days. And bad suspension is worse than no suspension. Rigid forks are pretty durable, so you may be able to find up a used one. Make sure that the crown-to-axle distance is similar to what you have ...


7

I'm going to recommend that you NOT do this. There were in the past manufacturers of 1" steerer suspension forks - though I'm not certain that they're are still sold. It is important to note that bicycle frames built to accept solid steel forks have different geometry than those built for suspension forks. The frame is designed for a fork that doesn't have ...


7

You will not damage a suspension fork by hanging it upside down. Although the fork is air sprung it also uses oil for dampening in one of the legs. Oil may leak if your seals are degraded. The seals in suspension forks are made to ensure they don't react with the suspension oil. The oil will actually help lubricate the seals. This is the same for coil ...


6

I don't think tire pressure should be set on how cushy you want your ride (unless you have no shocks). Tire pressure pressure and tread selection should be done based on how much traction you need. The trade off is that with more traction, you get a higher rolling resistance and you need to exert more energy to cover the same ground. This is why road bike ...


6

The technical term is "threaded fork". That is, the steering tube has threads on top for the headset to screw onto. The newer design is called "threadless" - that's the one where the stem clamps onto the steering tube with pinch bolts. You can switch from one to the other as long as the diameter of the steering tube is the same. (You'll obviously have to ...


6

The real issue is in the top tube length. Basically, for shorter riders you need to move the handlebars closer to the seat. But then you have to deal with the wheel possibly colliding with the pedals ("toe strike"), changing the head angle or the fork's rake, which compromises the handling, and/or having a proportionally longer top tube than would ...


6

You can purchase suspension-corrected rigid forks which are designed to work with the geometry that suspended frames offer (Essentially the axle-crown measurement places the head tube where it needs to be. Pretty simple.) There are a few manufacturers out there, but my favorite is Surly (in terms of quality and in value. They offer several forks for 26"-29" ...


6

My thinking is that it is a brazed on guide for dynamo hub wiring. A touring bike like the Devinci Caribou would likely have provisions for things like dynamo lighting (I think that it'd be more likey that this was the case than someone erroneously adding a disc brake cable guide on a non-disc fork.) Typical braze-ons look like this: As you can see there ...


6

This is your stem. As you can see, it is the whole unit from the bars to the top of the fork, including the adjustable bit in the middle. Most dan't have this and I think this is where the confusion is coming from. To remove your bars for packing, it is usual to remove the 4 bolts on the face plate on the stem. That is the part immediately touching the ...


5

How much unusual stress are you talking about? The weight of the bike all on one leg of the fork? Or the weight of a really large person leaning back against the fork? If it's just the weight of the bike leaning "wrong" on the fork, I wouldn't worry about it. That fork leg is built to handle a lot more stress than that in normal riding. If it's worrying ...


5

The overwhelming majority of modern road forks are designed for 10mm axles and 100mm-width hubs. (Since the hub width is the important measurement, it's the inside measurement between the dropouts which should concern you). After you've ensured that the wheel sizes are the same (700c), the largest concerns are the axle-to-crown measurement; or very nearly ...


5

I would consider looking at a used later model bike.The improvements made in the last 18 years are worth the money.A decent fork can run hundreds of dollars not including installation. Check with your local bike shop for used bikes or craigs list if you keep it local so you can see before you buy.Bikepedia is a good reference to make sure you have an idea ...


5

One of the main problems with converting an old bike is the width of the headset. Old rigid mountain bikes[1] commonly have a 1" headset while modern suspension bikes have a 1 1/8" diameter headset. Suspension forks are mostly for 1 1/8" headsets so fitting suspension to an old rigid mountain bike is normally a non starter for that simple reason. The ...


5

Proviso - my advise presumes you are not looking at forking out $2K or more for a bike, and probably significantly less. At a high price point I might suggest suspension. I also presume the gravel section is well maintained with average (pea - grape) size gravel (Where I ride, we sometime use logging roads, the "gravel" is stones about 2"-3" across.), and ...


5

Most bike shops hang a substantial portion of their inventory and repairs upside down to save space. I'm not aware of a fork that cannot be stored upside down. As pointed out by DWGKNZ, forks with degraded seals and wipers may be more prone to leaking since the oil is up against them and gravity + capillary action are at work. Some forks with fancy valving ...


4

It sounds like you've sorted out the first issue, headset size. You'll need something with a 1 1/8" (also seen as 1.125" or 9/8") steerer. Your bicycle's handling is based on the geometry. Changing the axle-to-crown distance will change the angle of your head tube, altering your bicycle's handling significantly. The other major characteristic of a fork ...


4

Over time forks become less responsive (move slower basically), but as this effect happens over the course of 12-18 months (the usual fork oil and seal lifetime), it's difficult to notice as you just get used to it. So most fork manufacturers tell you to change it after so many miles. This responsiveness loss happens for a couple of reasons on different ...


4

If by "steerer" you mean the top tube that turns in the bearings, it would be very bad for that to be bent, since it would seriously muck up the bearings, and ever getting it straight enough to NOT muck up the bearings would be unlikely. Apart from the bearings, with something like a conventional steel fork the twin concerns are fractures in the steel and ...


4

2 things: While many older forks used replaceable steerer tubes, the steerer tube is still specifically shaped for that fork. Tubing will not do it. You need an oem replacement steerer tube. Nobody makes forks like that anymore, hence the lack of google results. Also, that steerer tube in the photo looks to be steel, and should not be replaced with ...


4

The fork is "right" if it has the right "sag", that is, if it lowers a bit when you get on the bike. The right sag is no less than 10%, no more than 25% of total travel, for a regular bike (non-downhill, non-special-purpose); Basically three "areas" must be addressed on maintenance: Cleaning the inside, for removal of old oil/grease, water, mud, grime, ...


4

Yes - if you change to a 15mm or 20mm though axle, you will need a new hub to suit. Keep in mind that bike carries that you remove the front wheel and use the QR will be not be useable as well. Apparently the benefits of the though axle out-weigh the disadvantages of incompatible parts etc. However I would think hard before "upgrading" away from QR and ...


4

how does a higher fork contribute to higher stress in the frame? By creating a longer lever, and stretching the end of that lever to a greater angle, it transmits more force to the bottom of the head tube (the part of the frame where the steer tube passes through). This can cause damage to the head tube itself or where it joins both the down tube and ...


4

Most 120mm forks have a similar axle to crown height and it's more or less 40mm higher than the axle to crown height of typical 80mm fork. There are of course differences between models, but not really enough to matter. Typically hard tail frames are designed around a range of fork sizes. 120mm would be long for an XC frame that came with an 80mm fork. I ...



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