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3

This is a usual issue if the bearings in the steering tube are overtightened. Re-adjust the bearing (or take it back to the shop) and you're good to go.


1

There are a few factors to choosing a headset, primarily frame related: Does the frame require a threaded (1") or threadless head set? What is the headtube/ steerer type (1.5 straight, tapered, 1 1/8 straight) Is the headset integrated (cups sit within the frame)? Deciding if a fork will fit is a bit easier, is the steerer the correct length (it can be ...


0

Looks like nobody has taken the geometry into account yet... In the image below I have drawn the situation with highly exaggerated proportions. All not-lowest-end suspension forks (at least the ones I know of) have a rake that is created by shifting the axle in front of the lower tubes. Let's take a wheel of radius r (solid blue circle) and add some ...


0

In my opinion it wouldn't give any advantage....except possibly with some lower end disc brakes where the rotas may tend to get very hot with hard use may make you slightly less prone to burned shins and ancles...other then that just a gimmic


2

We all easily understand the problems of under tightening a screw or bolt - if is too loose, things move, it ends badly and we know why. Most of us also know that too much torque can damage the components, and in extreme cases strip the thread of the fastener. What many people do not understand is that bolts stretch when torqued. At the correct torque the ...


1

The stem cap torque specification is for safety and bearing tolerance. The cap provides a preload on the headset bearing. This preset is the point where there is minimal movement between the steerer tube and the headtube. At the same time the bearing is loose enough to allow free turning of the fork. This is why the top cap is adjusted prior to the bolts ...


0

Some points that have not come up I think riding a non-suspension bike is more fun It is you and the road On the trails you need to pick a line and use technique Most tricks are easier on a non-suspension You have something solid to push off from and lighter Hop both wheels up a curb is easier on a non-suspension So on the ruff stuff you are a little ...


2

I would view front suspension as a nice comfort option for your use-case, particularly in cities with speed bumps, potholes etc. Fully rigid frames, particularly aluminum ones which is what you'd likely get in your price range can be pretty unforgiving and while fat tyres help a bit, front suspension makes a bigger difference. Given that you don't plan to ...


11

Benefits of suspension forks (city/gravel road use): Remove chatter from bumpy roads Take the jar out of major bumps Better traction Drawbacks of suspension forks: Entire bike is heavier, leading to a less agile bike. A bike with suspension (all else being equal) will hit more holes and hit them harder. It will also climb like a pig and accelerate ...


2

For what you're talking about I would avoid front suspension, partly because you don't need it however good it might be (and there is a downside IMO) and partly because nothing you'd get at that price would be very good anyway. Obvious downsides of unnecessary suspension are weight, money that's gone into it that could have gone into something more ...


3

Typically forks on a cheap bike will be undamped, heavy and in general not terribly efficient. All bike components can break so I wouldn't just assume because it's expensive it will last. For occasional offroad use, I'd get something with a rigid fork because (as arne mentioned), the other parts are likely to be better but also because the rigid fork will be ...



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