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You can ride anything on anything... have a look for "Martin Ashton Road Bike Party" on Youtube to see what I mean. The original mountain bikes were fixed frame bikes with wide (1.9") knobbly tyres and an extra chain ring at the front. Don't get taken in by the "need" for suspension. You don't need it, that's why your elbows and knees bend. Having said ...


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Yes, you can absolutely use a hardtail for trail riding. In fact some manufacturers are making hardtails specifically designed for this, with slack head angles and beefy forks. As an example, here is the Orange Crush (plenty of other choices out there), with a 66deg head angle, 140mm fork and clearance for 2.4" tyres. For your budget I would look for a ...


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First and foremost... Yes, you can definitely ride trails on a hardtail and it will help you get lots of technical skills that a full suspension bike wouldn't give you, unless you jumped class (enduro) on a trail bike. Plus, it will be way more comfortable riding in the city. Secondly, given your budget, i would suggest you didn't make a custom one. Buy a ...


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Con: Because there is only one side on the fork, it limits you to using disc brakes only, since there is no place to mount any type of rim brake solution.


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You can spread steel forks safely (never spread aluminum/carbon fiber), and its not a trivial task to do at home, since you need to keep the fork blades spaced symmetrically and you don't have the same type of leverage available for the rear triangle. Then re-bend the axle mounts, as Criggie points out in the comments. Sheldon Brown has some tips on how to ...


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Low end forks are generally not repairable. The primary reason is that spare parts are not readily available. They can however be serviced. The labor involved would make it prohibitive to pay for the service as it will likely exceed the forks' value. Most can be disassembled, cleaned and greased. Remove (read this as pry) the plastic caps on the upper legs. ...


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It is possible to upgrade on some fork models yes. You will need to check the fork compatibility though to be sure. Check the SRAM site for a quick idea if your model is/was available with the Xloc. Else you need to get your fork serial to a dealer and ask them if it's compatible. Then remember, that it will require the the compression damper parts as ...


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It's not clear what is actually bent. From your picture, it is obvious what isn't bent: your fork is perfectly straight from the crown down to the drop outs. Also, the boot which covers the stanchion seems to be quite suggestively aligned with the fork; the bend seems to occur at the top of the boot, just before the head tube. If so, then it is in fact the ...


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You should be able to find a second hand fork, with or without the headshok, fairly easily. The Headshok is not too hard to work with, I have an ISO406 fork built to bolt on for my custom touring bike and any framebuilder should be able to make a fork that fits. But I have never really looked at the stock forks to see whether they're designed to be removed ...


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Aluminium doesn't like bending and rebending (try it with a soda can). I'd make sure that the frame isn't bent and if it isn't, then either get a new fork or an old fork from a donor bike. Your bike shop should help you do either. p.s. The headshock does limit which forks will fit on your bike as it changes the geometry.


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The main difference is in the damping, both have similar other options like Dual Position and Solo Air, length etc. With RC it's more like a 'progressive' dial. From full open indexed as you dial to locked. This affects the 'stiffness' of the fork. In other words when riding uphill, you dial to 'lock', it firms up and you have less front end bob. Whilst ...


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I would say sell and buy a full bike (even second hand). Components on bike are chosen to work together with the frame geometry. Parts are way more expensive alone than as part of a bike. You could change transmission, seat post, and maybe handle bar. But don't mess with frame and suspension unless you know what you do. As a guideline you can choose ...


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Like everyone, the first time I saw this fork I find it obvious that it must be weaker than conventional forks... Until I realized that conventional forks are not symmetrical at all. One side is the spring (air or metal spring) and the other side is the damper. This means the sides always works against each other. And the fork do not behave the same whether ...



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