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2

Hard to tell from the photo whether a light or something else was mounted there in the past. It's certainly possible. There aren't any modern lights I'm aware of designed specifically to mount to the side of the fork like that. Many dynamo hub lights are designed to mount to the joint of the left/right sides (i.e. the crown) of the fork, but that type of ...


0

You shouldn't count on it, no. Low-end and touring forks may not have the parts available at all. With medium-to-high end MTB forks, the parts may be available but it often requires exchanging most of the innards, making it a much too costly proposition. It in not just a matter of adding a lever to the top.


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See Emyr's answer above. In a threadless headset (which is what is shown in the picture), the stem is what keeps the fork compressed into the head tube. To make sure the stem is holding the fork in correctly, loosen the bolts that hold the stem to the steer tube of the fork. Then tighten the cap on top of the steer tube. You have to make sure the cap is ...


3

The wobbling could come from the fork. This is easy to check by putting a finger between two parts of the headset (as you can see here, around 0:35 ). If you brake and feel movement, problem is for sure on the headset. If you do, is the headset the correct size, BOTH for the frame and for the tube? And are they in good shape? These parts have low tolerances ...


1

You don't mention the stem in your question. If you tighten the topcap bolt without loosening the stem clamp, you won't be preloading the headset; instead you'll be crushing the spacers between the step and topcap.


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Just looking over the specs (having not heard of the brand before here in the US), I'd say what you have is a decent entry level bike. With the Suntour XCM-DS forks on there I'd probably avoid doing any jumps. I'f I'm right, it looks like the fork has adjustable pre-load; if so make sure to tighten it up enough to keep it from bottoming out, if not you may ...


3

Looking at the component specs, its an entry level MTB, one better than a BSO. 80% of mountain biking is about the rider and his skills, not the bike. Shops won't tell you this, as telling you your riding skills matter most does not end in a sale of a newer season/more expensive bike. Cashed up middle aged execs won't either - many just want you to see ...


0

Yes, you can use a 1 1/8" fork with a 1 1/2" frame. I did it on one of my bikes. You just have to get a special "reducer" headset. It doesn't look goofy at all - you can't even tell unless you look closely. You'll have to get a threadless fork. Nobody makes reducer headsets for threaded forks. Most new forks come with an un-cut steering tube - that means ...



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