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1

My experience with Lefty goes back to 2000 when I purchased my Cannondale Super V. One thing I've liked about it how easy it is to 'turn off'. There's a small dial at the top that disengages the suspension - good when transitioning onto solid road riding. As mentioned above by another post, the center of balance is altered. The implication of which is ...


1

What's actually increasing the cost in performance fork is it's construction qualitiy. It's slightly better in terms of durability and a bit lighter. Depending on the year of make, performance may also include a new technology or system that the evolution (which is the basic lineup) won't have (thus making it more expensive). Think fox's lineup as this: ...


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You could fit 120mm, but you really shouldn't. You shouldn't even really be jumping on that bike shaped object. Hitting bigger jumps does not require more suspension unless you are doing it on the kind of terrain which that bike is not capable of handling. Hitting bigger jumps only requires more technique. If you are serious about getting into dirt jumping ...


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Remote as a general term means "controlling from a distance". From that perspective it can work with either hydraulic or mechanical lockout. It is a separate entity to the lockout and is just a way of controlling it from, say the handlebars.


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Yes, they are safe. Said better, all else being equal there is nothing about the curve in an aluminum fork that would make it less safe than a straight fork.


10

It depends on how the fork is engineered for safety. While its plausible that the curved shape does add to some shock absorption, that is determined by the width and construction of the fork tubing. You could design a fork which was reliable and curved in aluminum or carbon or whatever, but the engineering wouldn't be the same as a steel fork. Whether the ...


0

As far as I'm aware, remote lockout is only compatible with a hydraulic lockout system. A mechanical lockout requires the fork to be completely extended in order to lock it, which is generally not the case when you're on the bike.



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