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Also, the sram product matrix can be handy (y is cost, x is severity of impacts): source: https://www.sram.com/sites/all/themes/sram_2011/st_rockshox/_images/products/product-matrix.png


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That stanchion is stuffed and needs to be replaced. If the damage is from normal wear and tear the other will need replacement - probably cheaper to get a whole new fork. If its accident damage (e.g from rubbing while on a car rack) and the other is in very good condition, replacing the damaged one is an option (if you can find a single replacement). ...


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2cm seems like a lot to attempt to fix this way. I would not trust this repair to just any old bike shop, but find one that specializes in working on older steel bikes. I'd expect to pay for about an hour of labor at whatever is the going rate for the shop. I have attempted to do this kind of repair on a fork myself following Sheldon's directions and it's ...


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This is normally specified by the brake manufacturer, not the fork manufacturer. A summarizing table of common torque values provided by Park Tool is here. For Shimano, they recommend 70-85 inch-pounds, 90 inch pounds for Campagnolo and 68-72 inch pounds for Cane Creek. However, it wouldn't hurt to check with the fork manufacturer and the brake ...


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I found that the issue with wanting to keep our old frames and ante up with a beefed out fork is hard. If you do in fact want the upgrade, try Aliexpress.com for 1 1/8 steerer tubes and old skewer axle options that are hard to find without buying a whole new bike. I purchased one fork, instead of the "Tapered fork Overhaul" and just bought a new 1 1/8 ...


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I think it's very rare, you'd better buy your bike already with that - maybe have a deal in your local shop to swap the fork to a lockout one when buying the bike. Disc brakes are much better than rims IMHO



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