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0

I'm not sure how much of this is marketing, but I believe the main reason is comfort. The longer seat post has more flex to absorb bumps and the seat stays being lower gives the rear triangle more flex too. Another advantage is a lower stand-over height for bikes with high bottom brackets.


0

No, there is no structural difference. Bikes with two eyelets are meant for a rack and panniers, but are basically the same tabs. If you only have one eyelet, you can attach both rack and panniers to the same one, and use p clamps to secure the rack to the seatstays. A lot of racks come with hardware to do this.


3

There's no difference that I'm aware of. My bike has 2 sets of eyelets, and I have a fender screwed into one set, but I could just as easily use the other set. I suppose the same could be said of using either set for rack mounts. Looking at it from a structural point of view though, it would probably depend on the bike and the materials it's made of. But ...


1

Without budget/loading amount it's difficult to answer, as for light loads a traditional mixte will be OK, but for heavier loads a touring bike really is better. Thorn cycles does step through touring frames...these are not cheap however they're a small UK company that has made touring bikes for yoinks so reliability and comfort are guaranteed. Comes with ...


0

Here's a photo of the chip, hopefully this helps narrow things down.


0

The effects of the chip depend a bit on "how much" was chipped away. Generally it is always better to seal the chip. I have seen water getting under the protective paint/carbon layer and the area slowly expanding. If the chip is small I've heard people using nailpolish with good success. For anything a bit bigger, I would probably bring it into a carbon ...


1

After disassembling the front assembly, as per Carel's and Davorin Ruševljan's suggestions, I found out that the fork tube (going through the headtube) had a crack in it, which is most probably what was making the creaking noise (see picture below).


1

"Women's frame" generally means a frame that's been modified to better suit many women's bodies with a shorter top tube, narrower handlebars, etc. "Step-through" describes what you're looking for. I recommend giving "Dutch style" bikes a try. Workcycles bikes are popular and I think a model like the Secret Service is good for illustrating what attributes ...


10

If you and she are willing to throw down on a custom, I can personally recommend Violet Crown Cycles. Otherwise, consider the Rivendell Betty Foy/Ivan Gomez or building up a Soma Buena Vista... but she might actually do fine picking up a mass-market step-through that fits well (Electra, Jamis, and Trek have models worth looking at) and upgrading the ...


3

Several options: Public bikes - has several frame styles with step through design Linus bikes - has several frame styles with step through design Soma Buena Vista - a nice mixte frame style, available as a frame or complete bike. May want to consider adding fenders with a skirt guard if she frequently rides with a longer skirt.


3

The first thing is style. There are the conventional step through/lady frames: and mixties which have the same sort of clearance as step through frames but are stronger. Then there are women specific geometry bikes. In general, both mixtes and step through bikes are inferior to the standard diamond frame due to reduced strength and stiffness, ...


0

Are you prioritizing longevity above all else? Because nothing's likely to beat a cheap bike of thickwalled straight-gauge chro-moly steel (which isn't particularly vulnerable to corrosion, especially if you sand and repaint, or apply rust converter to, any nicks in the paint). Lightweight, high-end tubing is more vulnerable to picking up dings, buckling in ...


4

When you buy a frame, they state the wheel type (it should have the right hub spacing for frame, braking surface (disc/rim brake) and rim size for the type of wheel the frame was intended to run and the size of tire you are intending to run) and tire clearance with it. Note that the tread pattern also affects clearance - if you have very aggressive tread or ...


0

Some modern steel frames are ED coated, which inhibit rust on the inside and out. All-City does this with most of their frames, and Surly has started to do this with some new models as well (such as the ECR and straggler). Though in my experience the paint can chip a bit easier, but the ED coating below tends to remain intact. This may be an option if you ...


3

Its not just the material that affects frame longevity, but the design of frames - different tubing thicknesses and geometries will last longer than others given the same materials. That being said, a lot of touring bikes (often made of steel such as Reynolds 521 or the Tange equivalent or something, since in a pinch, you can repair steel in pretty much ...


0

This calculator here http://bikegeo.muha.cc/ may be helpful. It looks as though it's meant to calculate geometry changes resulting from a fork swap, but it does give you stack and reach.


1

Pull out the stem and remove the bar. Clean the contact surfaces. Grease them with cycle grease and put everything back in place. Don't forget to put grease on the threads of the bolts. Tighten with the required torque.


0

This guide from Sheldon Brown may be of use. I'd start with checking out the headset to make sure its tightened down appropriately.


2

With the old style headsets this symptom was generally due to the handlebar slipping slightly inside the reenforcing tube that surrounds the center on most bars. The tube was glued to the bar, and eventually some of the glue would fail, allowing the two to move relative to each other as you rode and the bar flexed. In very rare cases the bar would actually ...


0

In the past I've eliminated sounds such as creaking and popping up front by correctly torquing the stem and handlebar bolts. I guess the bolts were tightened inconsistently and the cause for the noise.


1

It is quite hard to locate origin of sound like that. Since sound comes from critical area, where some of the failures might result in loss of teeth or worse, I would suggest through approach. After eliminating simpler problems like skewers and bolts not tight enough (too much), or bearing issues, I would suggest disassembling whole stem/headset/fork ...



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