Tag Info

New answers tagged

6

No, Trek will not sell you just the frame if they don't offer it in their product lineup. And a bike shop wouldn't either, given that they have to buy the whole bike anyway. It's just a massive headache to allow things like that for manufacturers. And many manufacturers generally aren't all too keen on letting people sell their bikes online (accessories are ...


0

90% chance its a generic BSO. If you have a distinct feature, post a photo and someone might recognise it, but... Why do you want to bother identifying the maker? You already have a frame that will have certain dimensions or bearing sizes. There's little if anything to be gained from buying parts from the manufacturer. Your best tools are likely to be a ...


10

3D printing have many disadvantages: Materials cost and strength: although new materials has been made over the years to reduce the cost, it is still quite expensive for mass production. In our department, a good material would cost £10/g, and the cheapest is around £1/g (very porous and fragile). Labour cost: it takes time to CAD a small part, but it ...


1

I recently had a cycle stolen, the copper (I'm in England!) who came to take the statement, wasn't at all interested in taking the serial number, he reckoned they're never recovered / returned that way and a photo of it was far more useful. When it was initially stolen, I couldn't find the booklet I'd written the serial number in, so I called the supplier ...


5

If a manufacturer found they had a quality problem with a batch of products (e.g. bikes but equally cameras, phones...) the serial numbers would allow identification of the substandard units. If you've recorded the serial number of your bike and a bike thief is caught with bikes in their possession the serial number should help you get it back. This has ...


2

The main function of a serial number is to prove that you own the bike. Just like a VIN number on a car, your serial number helps authorities determine who the lost or stolen bike belongs too. Also, it does help the store you purchased the bike from, as well as the company that made the bike, in keeping track of warranties, who owns the bike, the address ...


4

A common use of serial number is to prove ownership. If you don't have the serial number linked to your identity then that is your problem. My shop registers the serial number. If they don't put it on the receipt then force them to write it on the receipt. On a used bike write it down and take a picture with your residence in the background. My local police ...


1

Your serial number description STATES that this is a "Murray of Ohio" manufactured bike. Serial number on bottom bracket means before 1965... the factory was removed from Ohio and located in Tenn. from ~1952 on. The 502 means Sears... check out late 1950s to 1960s catalogs for the 5 digit model number that's between MOD and the lower larger serial number. ...


2

There are many issues for the new frame: Fork drop out (front wheel spacing) might be wider, 100 mm for most modern bike Frame dropout (rear wheel spacing) might wider, 135 for most modern bike Headset likely to be wider, so you have to buy new headset with compatibility to a 1" fork (I guess?), 1-1/8 inch to 1-1/2 inch for modern bike Bottom bracket is ...


1

As for your alloy question, yes. The alloy specification itself is just the grade of aluminum used. Similar to the way you would find the type of steel used to make a knife or similar things like that. As for what type of spray paint to use, I would recommend a Rustolium metal paint. Go to your local hardware store/paint store and ask them for a specific ...


4

In this sort of negotiation, typically you end up meeting somewhere in the middle. You provide a number, the other side provides a lower number, and the actual number is somewhere between those two numbers (possibly close to what the other side offered initially). Even if the number you supply is accurate and well-supported, I'd wager they will offer less. ...


0

If there is decal of the manufacturer, you might be lucky to find the man who made it, and with serial number you might ask him original price, and how much he would charge for repair or substitute frame.


2

I would go with the replacement cost of the frame. Find some equivalent CrMo framesets and look at prices.


0

Photos of the overall frame and its details (photos of the dropouts, the lugs, the fork crown, and any decals would be especially helpful) along with any information you have on the components on the frame would help us give you an idea of the quality of the bike. As a guide you might find these posts, on bicycle quality, helpful. The author is looking ...


0

I'm way late to this party, but in case anyone else wanders in, I'll say - based on countless postings of similar Ti-frame problems - that this and similar joined areas are common locations to have a crack on a titanium frame. Gary E (above) already talked about the need to have an inert gas atmosphere when welding titanium or you will find that the titanium ...


0

It is a very minor dent but horizontal mid tube is not a good spot. Creasing a tube does reduce the strength. A hard landing or hard bump is where that would likely be the first point of failure. Even if that section has lost 50% strength it would take a lot for the bike to fail. The rest of the frame is there and even 50% strength on that section is a lot ...


1

Beyond rebuilding the frame with a tapered headset, not practical. Effectively you need to fit an 1.5" OD tube into a 1.125" ID hole. This could theoretically be done by using a spacer and locating the taper part of the steerer under the frame. The effect would be raise the headset height and change the bikes geometry. The advantages of the tapered ...


0

I'd say that's fine to ride. Seems like got created by applying distributed pressure over a pretty big area. Therefore no chipped paint etc. Even if that cracks apart, I wouldn't expect the entire bike to fall apart immediately, you still have the lower tube supporting stuff together:)


1

Just off the picture I'd say it's fine. Aluminum is more durable than many people think (you know they build airplanes out of the stuff?!) That said, I would carefully look at the areas where the tubes are welded together. Use a bright light and look for any small, hairline cracks in the paint. Most of the aluminum bikes I've seen fail usually snap at the ...


-1

Don't ride that. Aluminum will randomly snap at the best of times, and a fold-looking bend like yours only makes it worse.


0

No. If nothing else you'd need to strip the frame to have it repainted after the guides are brazed into place.



Top 50 recent answers are included