New answers tagged

0

Firstly, what is your ultimate goal?: To minimize the environmental cost entailed by creating a steel-framed bike To minimize the environmental cost entailed by 100+ years of creating and using a steel-framed bike or bikes To maximize the lifespan of a steel-frame bike To minimize the environmental cost entailed by creating a bike irrespective of frame ...


7

This is not a complete answer, but one factor certainly is that nowadays bikes often use powder coating as their finish, rather than liquid paint. Powder coating has signifcant advantages over paint (more resilient coating, no risk of running, no solvents required), but the surface characteristics are different. In particular, the sparkle effect of metallic ...


5

Find the centre of mass of your bike, which is usually just above the BB+downtube. There are two strategies for carrying the bike, assuming that the bike does not have any heavy accessories such as pannier rack+bag, which would otherwise alter the centre of mass of the bike: flat/downstairs: one hand go over the top tube, grab the down tube so that the ...


3

I have a crook shoulder so can't put a lot of weight on it. But our office bike room is on the first floor (second floor) and there's a stairwell to get up there. So I stand on the left, non drive-side where its cleaner, put my arm over the top tube and grasp the seat tube between the bottom bracket and the seat tube drink cage. On standing, the nose of ...


3

Here's some images to help see the relative differences. Note they assume your stem starts at the same point, so if you're thinking of raising it, print the top one out on paper and then draw your riser in, and how the other stem sizes would work. If you're feeling unsure, wimp out and buy/borrow an adjustable stem. They're heavy and complex, but you ...


2

The weight distribution is affected only by the location of saddle and handlebars related to the wheels. It does not matter whether it is by higher rise stem or higher head tube. The difference that might affect handling is that system of frame with high head tube and short stem is stiffer than one of lower head tube and longer angled stem. You can feel the ...


0

This may be a Schwinn. I used the first 5 digits of the serial and plugged it into this stolen bikes registry website. There's a bike starting with a similar serial number also starting with SNFSD followed by the same number of characters: http://bikeindex.org/bikes/3836 Does the picture look like yours?


2

Fetish bikes are a white label brand out of Taiwan. Most of their bikes change year to year and rarely have any identifying markings to a model outside a sticker (which is not applied when shipped, leaving it optional for the first owner to apply). Honestly it may not ever truly be identified. If you need a replacement part or repair, it's best to take it ...


1

They are probably going to feel the same, as it's the same bike. Depending on how hilly you're ride is the only real difference you might feel in comfort is that in your hands and forearms. The disc equipped version will have better power and modulation at the levers and depending on how much and how heavily you are braking this will lead to less fatigue in ...


2

I am an old-school welder, whose first job was torch welding tool steel. So I am going to braze my frame. I love both other processes and would TIG if I had one. My reasons for choosing brazing are twofold. Bronze is not as brittle as steel or moly so it doesn't fatigue as fast. Second, even perfect MIG and TIG welds concentrate the heat to such a small ...


4

While the aluminum frame itself will be relatively ok, the problem will be your bottom bracket (almost certainly made in part of steel) which was most probably sitting in a big puddle of water. Even if the water didn't cause the bearings to rust, a freezing/melting cycle can cause damage to the bearings themselves, force lubricants out, and otherwise mess-up ...


4

Technically rust is limited to iron. What is bad is the rust starts and continues. The water / oxidizing agent is not consumed. Aluminum will oxidize but it forms a protective coating. An aluminum frame will not "oxidize out". Some iron alloys such as stainless steel prevent rust. I don't know why you don't seem to see stainless in bicycles.


1

Is the frame pure aluminium? Aluminium does not rust. If the frame is an alloy you would need to check whether or not the other materials are susceptible to rust.


3

Bikes break because they've been either mistreated or not cared for. Riding a bike down stairs should be okay provided you don't fall off or catch anything.... that's what a MTB is built for. Proper care and maintenance keeps everything working, so lubrication and washing off mud/silt etc will keep the bike functioning. Storing your bike inside out of the ...


7

Sometimes I carry a fuel bottle down there when touring. It is out of the way and if the bottle happens to leak it doesn't cause much trouble – certainly not like having a leaking bottle of white gas in a pannier…


5

The main advantage is that it gives you an extra water bottle. Being lower down means that if you are swinging the bike from side to side it has less effect - this isn't about the 1kg being part of the total 100kg rolling mass, it's 1kg on a 10kg bike when you're out of the saddle on a climb. Tourists often spend considerable effort on carrying water, ...


8

Other? I would not count protection as the first. The cage is a lever and some edges. A water bottle is not exactly an impact attenuator. And you have the chain ring to get past. You pretty much only see a third on touring bikes. It is the least convenient location but it is a third location. Three bottles or a frame bag and one bottle. Pretty much ...


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I have a similar problem with my MTB and so far, I have ridden several hundred km and the crack remains the same. Good luck.


0

I had this problem on a 31.6mm seatpost I purchased from the web. It fit fine on one bike but on another it was just too tight - it would only fit a couple of inches into the frame before I would have to have used considerable force to get it in any further. The frames were all carbon (It would not fit on my Scott but would fit on my BMC and my brother's ...



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