New answers tagged

0

Looks like a 70s/80s single-speed bike, or possibly a 3 speed rear internally geared hub. Will be a steel frame and forks. Those brake calipers look somewhat flimsy, and the plastic saddle is definitely non-original, possibly from a BMX or kids bike. Its also possible it was a derailleur bike in the past but has had parts changed. Unless you know its ...


0

You can ride anything on anything... have a look for "Martin Ashton Road Bike Party" on Youtube to see what I mean. The original mountain bikes were fixed frame bikes with wide (1.9") knobbly tyres and an extra chain ring at the front. Don't get taken in by the "need" for suspension. You don't need it, that's why your elbows and knees bend. Having said ...


0

Yes, you can absolutely use a hardtail for trail riding. In fact some manufacturers are making hardtails specifically designed for this, with slack head angles and beefy forks. As an example, here is the Orange Crush (plenty of other choices out there), with a 66deg head angle, 140mm fork and clearance for 2.4" tyres. For your budget I would look for a ...


0

I worked with someone who was a bike designer at cannondale a few years ago. He had told me the frames were designed to be cycle loaded 1,000,000 times before failure. So that means the frame could be loaded to the full design stress one million times before failure. Also welding a cracked frame is a VERY bad idea. The aluminum is heat treated. Welding it ...


1

First and foremost... Yes, you can definitely ride trails on a hardtail and it will help you get lots of technical skills that a full suspension bike wouldn't give you, unless you jumped class (enduro) on a trail bike. Plus, it will be way more comfortable riding in the city. Secondly, given your budget, i would suggest you didn't make a custom one. Buy a ...


1

As a fellow tall guy, try temporarily lowering your seat by half and see if the creaking goes away. If yes, your seatpost is simply too high and unsupported, so buy a longer one. 350mm and 400mm are available now, not overly expensive. Have a good close look at the frame for cracks too - I broke a frame by having the seat too high.


3

You could compare the geometries of the FX and the Cross Check. Matching the standover, 56cm matches. Comparing the effective top tube lengths, between 58cm and 60cm match. Bottom line the geometries are different. On another note, the FX doesn't seem to be a particularly high-end bike, so purchasing a complete Surly could possibly provide more economical ...


2

After talking to FBM's warranty department, they have confirmed that on the Hard Way, and a couple other frames, the serial number is located on a plate within the Bottom Bracket housing. I took my bike apart and found it right where they stated. Mine was on the left hand (if you're standing over the frame) side, but this could vary.


1

Its all about inventory and stock levels. Historically frames came in increments of 2 or 3 cm. So one model might be stocked in 48/51/54/57/60 cm or 48/50/52/53/56/58/60 By having more adjust in the seat post, the supplier can stock three frame sizes of small/medium/large and make up the in-between sizes with longer or shorter seat posts, which will fit ...


4

I would be surprised if any quality frame does not have a serial number. Many manufacturers warn against frames with no number, or numbers scratched off, so your concern is somewhat valid and you should follow up on it. Also reading http://fbmbmx.com/products/frames/fbm_warranty.php suggests the frame should have come with a warranty card. Photograph the ...


3

The bike is most likely a Verde Theory (from 2014) IIRC, these were the only models that had the embossed Verde leaf on the head tube. Source: I've been riding mostly Verde bikes and parts since 2011, have seen my fair share of parts and know the branding fairly well.


1

If your frame feels large you can get a shorter stem, lower the seat, move the seat forward, get riser bars or 'trekking bars' rather than drop bars. You change the position of the bars up and down by moving the stem position on the fork steerer tube and altering the number / position of the spacers. However, saying that try a bike before you buy is ...


2

I ride a bike that is a bit too tall for my daily commuter. Everything else is great, but it is a tall bike for me, so that I have to lean it over a bit when I stop at a light, or tip toe if I keep straight up with my butt on the saddle. I'm fine with it and it is still comfortable for my commuting needs. I don't think I would ride it with clips or straps, ...


5

You have a couple of options, lowering the seat and changing the stem, or some combination of both. One other option would be to find someone that has a similar quality bicycle that is slightly small for them and trade! Local co-ops or bike clubs would be a place to start for this. As for changing the components you may consider an adjustable stem so that ...


10

Verde BMX at http://verdebmx.com/completes/ They appear to be based in Columbus, Ohio, USA. Method: I did a google image search for "BMX logo leaf" because it looks like a leaf to me One of the images is this, which looks kind of similar Following the link to their web site gave me this answer


2

Google around and fine your local bike co-operative. They'd love for you to donate such a useful thing, plus you get the warm fuzzies for being on topic for this stack.


4

I pulled the cotter pin off and it turns out there's a spring inside the grey knob that pushes it down to the blue frame piece. That engages the 4 bumps on the grey knob with the 4 dents in the frame (giving 4 index positions per rotation of the knob). Seems like the cotter pin was meant to be removed all along and maybe only acts to hold the grey knob ...


2

Generally, there are a few wheel sizes for adults on the market now: 700c: This is the standard adult road bike wheel size. For mountain bikes, this is often sold as 29" and is also the standard (where they're said to roll over bumps easier than a 26" but at the cost of manuverability and weight). The rim diameter is 622 milimeters. 650b: This is becoming ...


0

If you look at the bottom of the plastic adjusting knob you will notice small bumps. Your frame lacks the corresponding bumps that would normally act as a detent to hold the knob in position. In practice you remove the cotter pin make the adjustment and reinstall the cotter as close to frame as possible.


2

It's rare for a manufacturer to have different wheel sizes for the same model, but it does happen sometimes. Fortunately, it's easy to check the wheel size, it's always printed or embossed somewhere on the tires. Yours will probably say 700c or 622mm or 28 inch - these are all equivalent. One other thing you'll have to consider is the rear dropout spacing. ...


2

Wheel size will remain the same, which is 700c, The different sizes of frames will only effect the overall geometry. So yes, you'll be fine getting a replacement of the same stock size.


3

Forget the calipers.Just install cantilever brakes. They are compatible with STI levers. v-brakes use the same boss placement as cantis. It's too bad that all cantis seem to be lousy in my experience, but they do the job.


7

Caliper brakes attach differently to V brakes, they have one pivot bolt in the centre rather than one each side. In your first photo there's a bolt that is in the right place although it's there for a mudguard/fender not a brake: A caliper brake actually needs a hole right through there, and has a long bolt that goes right through. On your bike there are ...



Top 50 recent answers are included