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2

Depends. First, you need to know the parts are still good. Then, you just need to match the frame's compatibilities. Are the wheel sizes the same and do they have the same width hubs? (The second answer is almost surely yes). Do you have mounts for the same type or appropriate brakes on both bikes to match the wheels? Does the new frame have a compatible ...


0

Unless you have the spare parts laying around build-outs are expensive and always labor intensive. It is not worth spending money on a frame the does not fit you. Road versus trail the fit is not that different. The frame fits you or not. I had mountain bike that the shock wore out and bought a better mountain bike. I put a fixed fork and tires on it ...


1

It is possible, but not likely economically a good move, especially if you're not doing the labor to swap the bike parts yourself (assuming you own the tool to remove the bottom bracket and what not). The bike is a relatively cheap one (~300 dollars), and you're likely to come out better financially by selling the bike and buying a larger one (which may have ...


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It's possible to make a bike bigger but closer to impossible to make a bike smaller. You may be fortunate and be able to make a change, ie a different seat post, that doesn't affect the handling of the bike too much. My recommendation: sell the bike and then get a bike that fits you like a glove. You'll take a loss most likely but not really since you'll ...


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You've got it the wrong way around. Road frames, in terms of horizontal toptube length, are significantly shorter than mountain bike frames. If it's a hardtail frame and it's too big for you with a flat bar, it's going to be way too big for you with a drop bar. On the other hand, you might be able to put a bar with significant sweep on the frame and have it ...


0

I'm in the same boat, but a little farther along. I am 5'9" and found a nice 56cm frame w Dura Ace last Spring. Its my first road bike so it took several rides to realize something was wrong. In short, I've changed to a shorter stem, switched to a 0 setback seat post and am looking at trying to switch to compact bars as I'm still just about 1 to .5 inch ...


2

It's a good, cheap way to build a first commuter. Throw on a pair of road slicks and lights and go to work. It will give you a chance to decide what you really want in a commuter bike. It will be able to handle bad roads and pot holes better than a road racing bike. But, it will still be heavier and slower than a bike based on a cyclocross/utility/road frame ...


1

The frame size is just the length of the seat tube. It will tell you some crucial details such as being able to stand over the frame and how well you can pedal, but doesn't tell you how well your bike fits your upper body. Two people the same height can have different proportions. I'm 6'2 and have a 31 inch inseam, so you are a lot leggier than me. If ...


3

Presumably its a 56 cm frame, not a 56 inch frame. The number doesn't always correlate well with what size you should be using. You can try a shorter stem, different handle bars, or a different seatpost which allows you to move more forward (or just move your seat). A good idea would be to go to a bike shop and pay for a bike fit if you haven't done this ...


0

As a builder of home bicycling contraptions myself (recumbents not bicycles) but also as a nationally competitive TT'ist (seniors) I have a comment on centering. Of course making the spoke offset symmetrical would (as mentioned prior) push the cogset far out, perhaps in 35-40mm range (just a rough guess). To keep the chain line correct would force the ...


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Ît will get worse. Buying a used frame is risky, generally, even if there are no visible problems.Could be bent, that to diagnose most people cannot do. Titan and aluminium are not a good material for a frame, in spite of widely spread, nowadays. But it is cheap and sold for nearly the same price as a top steel frame would cost, which is much more difficult ...


1

If the frames are being designed on a computer, CAD tools may help but these are high tech. Companies spend a lot of money on doing detailed analysis for durability and strength of frames. I don't know what design tools people did other than force diagrams and other mechanical engineering things before computers (which use a lot of finite element methods) in ...


2

Am I looking at the right thing? The little line running across the seat tube about 1cm above the bottom bracket? It's hard to say, but personally I'm not sure that's a crack at all. It looks more like a scratch. I say that because: a) it looks shallow, and b) that is a really, really weird place for a crack to occur. There are four types of stress ...


8

If you look at titanium frame bikes on the web you can see their warranties. Most have very long or life time warranties that cover everything but crashes and deliberate damage to the frame. So I would assume this frame was involved in a crash. There are three types or cracks in titanium frames (from best to worst): Weld crack seam crack (titanium comes ...



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