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0

In my efforts to restore a Vitus 979 frame, I found that a combination of coarse and then fine grain bronze wool will eliminate the oxidation and restore the finish of the aluminum. Follow up with Mothers Aluminum Polish. If the anodized portions contain oxidation and pitting, the bronze wool will finish it out but obviously the look will be less than ...


0

A cheap source of touch up paint, especially for the more garish colors is nail polish. Use a clear coat on tip for maximum strength.


1

Most probably, the seatpost just needs to be cleaned (dust gets in) AND/OR tightened a little bit. Don't overdo it, it's best to stay within the 50 Nm so as not to bust your seatpost ring or seat tube. Greasing the seatpost might also help. I wouldn't recommend any actual grease for this (messy, tends to get the seatpost stuck after a year of riding), ...


2

Often, dirt gets between the seat post and seat tube. Remove the seat post. Clean the post. Clean inside the seat tube. Grease the post and re-install. Hopefully the noise will be gone. You say the post is close to the max mark. For a little added safety, longer seat posts are available.


0

Try to put tube lower enough and check how it sounds in that position. If any sounds don't appear then just replace with new longer tube. It saves your frame. Or it might be sand or dirt cause noise. So try to clean up tube and frame.


1

Some good points above, but first of all you should ask the venue to check that you'd even be allowed on the track. Most velodromes have pretty draconian rules. Minimum BB height, maximum crank length, specific pedal requirements, restrictions on bottle cages, brake/rack/mudguard bosses... the list goes on. You'd almost certainly have to remove your brakes ...


2

But to compare 24 carat gold is just not fair. Bicycles are made of hardened alloys: Aluminium alloy 6061-T6 that is commonly used in bicycles is 6 times as strong as pure annealed aluminium. Steel 1090 alloy is 80 times a strong as iron. Hardened alloys go back to medieval times. Hardened 18 carat gold is about the same strength of Steel 1090. ...


0

For some types the answer appears to be "just marketing". I've got a 58cm road bike with 700x23 tires, and 18" wide handlebars. My wife's old bike (which she no longer uses and is now the one that I can beat around in town with when I don't feel like wearing cycling shoes since it has platforms on 1 side of the pedals) is a 53cm frame, 700x23 tires, and ...


4

Trivially: yes, of course you can. You almost certainly won't be able to ride that bike, though. The problem is not the weight of the frame, it's the weight of the rider compared to the strength of the gold. Essentially you have an 80kg rider on a frame that might weigh 20kg if made of gold rather than 5kg in steel. The dominant mass is still the rider. ...


5

According to Wikipedia, Gold has an "ultimate tensile strength" of 100 MPa, while steel runs from 400 to 5000. (Carbon fiber laminate is 1600.) Gold has a specific gravity of about 19, while steel has a specific gravity of about 7.8. So it would take about 4 times as much pure gold by volume, or about 9.7 times as much gold by weight. A 15 pound steel ...


5

It depends on the type of adhesive. Sometimes it can be just pulled off. Sometimes the gentle heat of a hairdryer (not a heat gun) can weaken an adhesive and make it easier to remove. Or you can try the use of GooGone or similar adhesive thinner/solvent (try on an inconspicuous place first to make sure it won't damage the finish). Heat and solvent cover ...


1

I researched more on this topic. The short answer is that an aluminium frame can last from a couple of years to 50 years/lifetime. The long answer is: The main factor is fatigue (not counting accidents): "The tendency of a material (metal) to break under repeated cyclic loading at a stress considerably less then the tensile strength in a static test." ...


11

There are a lot of question so I will settle on the one in the title. How many years will an current aluminum frame last of a touring bike? Depends: Don't know what aluminum frame Construction is a larger factor than material Don't know the use Use is a larger factor than material Don't know how you are going to care for the bike Care/maintenance is ...


0

Points to consider: A touring specific general bike is probably better, vs. the custom frame of a generalist shop. Geometry, strength, details (braze ons, eyelets, racks, etc.). If it is a not from a touring expert, your bike can be actually worse for touring vs. a touring expert's general bike. Is it a custom sized frame of an otherwise stock bike, or is ...


5

I am continuously amazed at the overemphasis placed on the weight of bikes. Yes it is important, but relative to other factors in deciding which bike to buy it is not that significant. Lets compare a 20lb bike to a 24lb bike. If your budget is $1000 for a new bike, would you choose a 20lb bike with very good components and a so-so feel/fit, or a 24lb bike ...


-3

wax(carnauba) will not harm paint fullstop...there is not cleaner agents in carnauba....cured paint is only down to the hardness it forms so to say not too wax or seal a fresh paint job is silly...would you not seal a new car...i know plenty of detailers do the full multi stage machine polish and finally seal new cars or fresh paint jobs....paint will cure ...


3

A recent view is that technology was less of a factor vs. sociological factors. The main sociological difference between the Penny-farthing and today's bicycle frame is the perspective of safety: the rider wants to feel safe or not. In the times of Penny-farthing mastering a difficult to ride horse/vehicle was a major feat, and riders wanted to show of ...


2

Great article about the pros and cons. The writer chose a 28" (700c) bike for single bike, and 26" for the tandem bike. 700c vs 26inch Wheel Size for Touring


2

Since both the bikes you link to are mountain bikes, you seem to be primarily concerned with wheel size or frame size. But the two wheel sizes are the same = 700c is, more or less, a rim size, while 29" is the outer diameter of the tyre (except that obviously you can get different width "29er" tyres and that affects outside diameter). That confusion is why ...


1

I'm assuming you mean a cyclocross frame vs mtb 29er frame. Generally road bike will be more maneuverable in tight areas, like when you are cutting lanes. The geometry is better suited to that. Also every 29er bike I've ever ridden has monstrously wide handlebars when compared to a road bikes handlebars. For maximum speed, road bikes will win that one as ...



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