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2

Good epoxy is known to bond metals, especially aluminum very well. Make sure the surfaces are clean and slightly rough for a better bond. I use the same two part epoxy hobbyist aircraft builders use for fixing pretty much anything, including broken ceramic mugs, small broken metal things and even as an insulator on the bottom of PCBs to prevent any shorts. ...


-1

You can take it to a welding shop and they will be able to weld it.


2

It may last for years and years as we are talking of an alloy frame, but it is not unbreakable. I have a friend of mine who broke a Trek Alloy XC hardtail frame and Trek replaced it with its latest model. Still, neither the front derailleur nor the headset were compatible, so he had to invest in both to get the bicycle back to work. According to Specialized ...


1

Brifters plus quill stem suggests around 1997 or 1998 vintage. The rear brake bridge formed like a front fork, instead of two full seat stays up to the seat post... that's quite unusual. Makes the smallish frame look even smaller. I'd guess its a 7, maybe 8 speed on the rear, can't see in the photos. The front fork has relatively little rake (curve) on ...


0

It can last many years. So many that you will probably have already got a new bike untill then... For example, I bought an Ideal Hillmaster in 2005 or 2006 with an 6061 alloy frame. I learned what mountain biking is really all about. Although being an xc bike, I hit lots of jumps, sick trails and gravity tracks. 2011 I got a full suspension to take the ...


3

The slightly sarcastic-sounding comment is correct, unfortunately. Even if you used a high-end xray imaging system to carefully analyse the frame, the best you could say is "there are no obvious defects found". You might find major defects, in which case you'd probably recycle the frame rather than riding it, but if you don't you haven't really learned a ...


1

Basing fit decisions on knee position relative to the pedals has largely been debunked as a myth. Furthermore, modern bike design trends have favored moving riders further forward on the frame and lowering the cockpit (i.e. handlebars) in order to put the rider in a more aerodynamic position. Trek's Emonda specifically was designed to be their most ...


2

European prices always include VAT, and US prices are typically announced without sales tax (or customs, if you really intend to order from US). Once you add the sales tax, the prices are closer. Generally, you will pay extra for a brand that is commonly not available in Europe. In addition to Surly, Thorn is easily available in Europe from UK and cheaper ...


0

I had a Trek which broke entirely through in the same place. Turned out it was still ridable, and I managed to carefully ride it the 6 miles home. The frame was several years old, had seen some heavy use, and the frame, forks and handlebars were pretty much the only original parts. I took it back to my local Trek dealer, and after a bit of debate they ...


1

My frame is cracked. There's a small crack that's forming on the bottom of the down tube, about half an inch away from the head tube weld. I noticed it because the paint on that spot came off (due to flexing I suppose). The noises are becoming more pronounced. I guess I'll try to get it welded, and if that doesn't work I'll just replace the frame.


6

As you're in the UK, the Consumer Rights Act applies. It would seem that a £5,500 bike that lasts less than two years isn't of "satisfactory quality", but I would be surprised if the shop simply gave you a refund. I think you have to give them at least one attempt at repairing the frame (I don't know how feasible that is for titanium), and take it from there....


2

As I said in comments, the real question here is: do it yourself or pay someone else. You can't really ride the bike as it is, so you don't have a lot to lose if it turns out to be unfixable. A simpler approach if you don't want to buy the expensive tool just for this is to use something else to bend the hanger straight. I normally use a large adjustable ...


3

Real track bikes don't have brakes. You need brakes for commuting, especially in a city, and at least 2 independent braking systems. Not all frames and forks have brake mounts. You also won't have fender or rack mounts which are nice in wet weather. Ergonomics and geometry can be an issue, given that track bikes tend to be a bit twitchy and aggressively ...


5

There is a tool specifically for this. For example, by Park Tools. Might that help?


7

You need to isolate this noise to identify the cause. Its great that you can duplicate the noise without having to ride. Try these suggestions to help narrow down the cause. squeeze the rear of the front wheel and the downtube together with your hand. This will replicate some of the stopping forces on your headset. We know the brakes show the problem ...


2

Further to the above comments: Your bike size sounds about right - see here: Evans size guide Stand over height is that you can stand over the top tube with your feet flat on the floor and raise the front wheel off the ground. When seated on the saddle you should be able to touch the ground with toes and possibly ball of your foot on one side at least. Look ...


14

If it can hold your weight while sitting on it, then it should definitely be OK to lift the bike from it.


3

Looks like filiform corrosion to me, which is a typical form of corrosion found on lacquered aluminium (and other metals). In my opinion, the scratches are too organic looking to be just scrachtes (with a layer of oxide forming in the scratch of the lacquer). It is indeed a superficial form of corrosion. This type of corrosion starts at a scratch or other ...


4

Welcome to BB standards hell...... you are about to learn far more than you wanted to about bicycle gearing cranks and chain rings.....The only spec I could find on these was the 1999 model, which used a Shimano BB-UN52, 113mm spindle BB Shell Width 73mm - its pretty common and typical of that era MTB. Your idea of another crank set is a possible ...


3

Frankly, it's going to be hard for random strangers on the internet to determine the extent of damage to carbon fiber from a picture. Be upfront with the seller - tell him you're uncomfortable and would like to have a bike shop take a look at it. Be prepared before hand - find a local, reputable shop, explain the situation and ask them if they'll do the ...


4

Since it's a few seconds with an allen key to pop the stem off and have a look at the inside of the head tube, I suggest doing that. Strongly suggest. If there's any damage to the fibres, or the cracks go deeper than the gel coat, don't buy the bike. If you don't know what that means, or the seller won't let you look, don't buy the bike. Exposed fibres or ...


1

I personally have no experience with carbon fibre. However there are carbon repair specialists who can tell you the damage. Find one of these specialists locally, and ask the seller to get it checked. You should share the results with seller, even if you paid for the testing youself. On no account would I buy the bike and then get it tested. Right now ...



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