New answers tagged

1

Welcome to BB standards hell...... you are about to learn far more than you wanted to about bicycle gearing cranks and chain rings.....The only spec I could find on these was the 1999 model, which used a Shimano BB-UN52, 113mm spindle BB Shell Width 73mm - its pretty common and typical of that era MTB. Your idea of another crank set is a possible ...


2

Frankly, it's going to be hard for random strangers on the internet to determine the extent of damage to carbon fiber from a picture. Be upfront with the seller - tell him you're uncomfortable and would like to have a bike shop take a look at it. Be prepared before hand - find a local, reputable shop, explain the situation and ask them if they'll do the ...


4

Since it's a few seconds with an allen key to pop the stem off and have a look at the inside of the head tube, I suggest doing that. Strongly suggest. If there's any damage to the fibres, or the cracks go deeper than the gel coat, don't buy the bike. If you don't know what that means, or the seller won't let you look, don't buy the bike. Exposed fibres or ...


1

I personally have no experience with carbon fibre. However there are carbon repair specialists who can tell you the damage. Find one of these specialists locally, and ask the seller to get it checked. You should share the results with seller, even if you paid for the testing youself. On no account would I buy the bike and then get it tested. Right now ...


6

My short answer is no. A true dirt jump frame is going to be horrible for short XC riding and even worse for extended 2 to 3 hour rides. You won't be able to get the extension to pedal efficiently and will just end up wearing yourself out standing. I have a dirt jump frame and after only a couple short commutes on it (4 miles) I decided it wasn't worth ...


3

There's a few approaches you could take... I'd say that getting it blasted should be the first step no matter what as chemical strippers can damage alloy frames are very messy and really bad for the environment. Give it a polish with some very fine grit wet/dry paper to polish up the alloy. Then you could use one or a combination of the methods below to ...


1

The solution is to sandblast it. Then polish the aluminum with a metal polishing compound before repainting it with a clear finish. This is easy, if detailed and time consuming work.


3

It's steering damper. It prevents your handlebar from self - turning. Increase comfort. Steering damper


2

I'm going to guess that the bike's fork is lacking in follow (ie it has straight forks, or forks without enough bend) so that without the spring, the bike will not self-center. It will likely feel that it wanders over the road and the rider has to actively keep it centered. You probably can't ride hands-free without the spring. The spring provides some ...


15

The purpose of such a steering damper is to stop the front wheel from turning when using a (two-leg) kickstand or while pushing the bike. Not much use otherwise.


3

The Bike you have is a GT VFR BMX bike designed by Dyno, and made of 1020 high tensile steel. These were made for a number of years. One model, 1997, is like this: Your answer is literally in your question.


5

I'd not take this "statement from authority" as an absolute truth. Ask them to prove its impact damage. Depending on your location, there may be ombudsman services or small claims courts where you can pursue them for "failure to honour warranty contract" If the frame is replaced, they will keep the old one and you look after your new one. If the claim ...


0

Given that the cassette is tied to the axle, if the alignment is changing, you have a few possible causes: Freewheel is worn out and has a significant wobble The pivot where the chainstay and frame connect is worn and loose Axle itself is loose, either through the hub, or at the dropouts When applying pressure to the pedal with the brake on, it will ...


2

I have a powder-coated Brompton, that recently had small areas (~2mm) of the finish rubbed down to the steel by cable housings. To deal with this (the area was spotless, the cables had the steel polished bright), I just applied touch-up paint, and let it dry for days. I will smooth it with 1000-grit sandpaper, then apply helicopter tape once this is done. ...


0

Looks like a 70s/80s single-speed bike, or possibly a 3 speed rear internally geared hub. Will be a steel frame and forks. Those brake calipers look somewhat flimsy, and the plastic saddle is definitely non-original, possibly from a BMX or kids bike. Its also possible it was a derailleur bike in the past but has had parts changed. Unless you know its ...



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