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There is a tool call a disc brake tab facing tool. This tool is designed to correct the alignment of IS disc brake tabs with the dropouts of the frame, so that the rotor will be correctly aligned with the caliper. See instructions below from Park Tool Repair Help Blog: Disc Brake Mount Facing (IS type) with DT-1 This article will discuss the use the ...


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Rear derailleur adjustment can be a really pain in the neck. What is more likely happening is that you have to adjust the B screw: B-Screw Adjustment After setting the L-screw, check the "B-screw" for an adequate setting. The B-screw controls the derailleur body angle, hence the name, B-screw. You can find detailed information about all the setting ...


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The screw adjustment you point the camera to @20s needs to be turned in. This will rotate the derailleur away from the chain stay. The screw pushes against a protrusion on the derailleur body.


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First of all - that sucks - sorry that happened. Your frame cannot be repaired. You are in a real rough spot as the components are nice enough to reuse, but finding a frame in that style is going to be hard. Bicycle models that allow you to buy only the frame are high end models, and there aren't any high end city bikes. You don't want a mountain bike frame ...


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You can try to find a serial number engraved somewhere on the bike. For road bike it is sometime under the bottom bracket, so you can try to look there first. Manufacturers might have different serial number pattern so you can start your search there. Other than that, posting a picture on a forum or here might be a good idea since some people might ...


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I have a 2013 Trek X Cal and also a 2015 Trek Remedy 9 29er. I'm 6'2", and when I started biking about 8 months ago I weighed 321lbs, now after over a 1000 miles of mountain biking I'm a trimmed down 255lbs. I believe the Treks are also rated at 300 lbs and I have had no problems with either bike. I've also never felt that either frame or rims were being ...


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The one thing I always say to people in your situation is to remember that we have all been there. And the saving grace here is that by the time you get to buy your second bike, you will know exactly what to look for. With that in mind, you might want to think about limiting what you spend on your first bike. But for the moment... For your suspension and ...


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There is no substitute for riding a few different bikes to feel the difference. To get to do this, you'll need to develop a relationship with a local bike shop (LBS). A good LBS will let you take a bike for a short ride, and some will hire a bike to you for a longer ride. Explain what you want and what your budget is. Be up front that you're checking out ...


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Tires can make a significant different in terms of comfort, especially on uneven roads. If you're comparing two different bikes, ask what is the largest tire that either one can handle. I used to have a road bike where some 25mm tires rubbed on the front derailleur clamp (a tire labelled "25mm" is not always 25mm wide). With that bike I didn't have a ...


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Aside from lowering the seat, you might also look for handlebars that curve/point backward to prevent the rider from leaning forward too much. But this really also depends on the rider's arm and leg lengths. Can you find a smaller bike?


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I have two suggestions: It sounds obvious but look at the angle of your back in your normal riding position and consider going more vertical. Proper fit for a time trial racer and vs. somebody who wants to get around town and get some exercise will give vastly different angles. Try a recumbent. These put you in an aero position and the seatback lets you ...


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There are multiple causes of back pain; it's the most common human ailment, and the solution is unlikely to be simply given in an Internet forum answer. Just because you've ridden the same bike for years does not mean it fits you. For example a slightly incorrect fit could be causing the problem. And your body can change over time; perhaps you've gained ...


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I have a touring bike and I find it quite comfortable. But them again, I don't have back issues. It's a bit more upright than most road bikes, and possibly more upright than some hybrids I've seen, as long as I'm riding on the hoods. Try to find a place that rents bikes or will let you have an extended trial ride in order to determine if it would help fix ...



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