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33

Do you hear a "tick" sound every time you spin the wheel anti-clockwise? that's the freewheel mechanism composed by two small parts called "pawls" and when you spin it on that direction, those pawls turn loosely until they find the "dent" in the inner mechanism (the ratchet body), that's when the "tick" sound happens. When you ride your bike, those two ...


11

For the same reason you can't have a fixie with a chain tensioner. The load on the chain when slowing a fixie is too great and in the wrong direction for a derailler or tensioner to hold. The cage will be pulled forward and your chain will skip make a nasty noise and most likely come off or break something expensive.


10

Most of the noise comes from pawls on the freewheel hitting against the splines on the engagment surfaces which makes up the racheting unit. Some reasons for the noise between freewheels? Tension on pawls could be higher causing more noise as they glide over the engagment surfaces High end freewheels have more pawls and engagement points than lower end ...


8

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


7

There's not much you can do aside from cleaning your drivetrain often and thoroughly. In the winter, ice is far less of a mechanical issue than is rock salt. You may indeed have some corrosion in the entire drivetrain by this point, not just the deraileur, or possibly just dirt if you're lucky. I'd do one major cleaning at this point, and see if that takes ...


6

Your hub has a normal freewheel, like described by Matt Adams (ratchet with pawls). There are some models which have spring-loaded cilinders mounted around "tilted" teeth: when you spin it to one side, the cilinders slip. When you spin it to the other side, the cilinders are caught between opposite surfaces, and torque is transmitted by friction (there is ...


6

If you're saying that, off the body, the sprockets move slightly relative to each other, that's not a problem. The sprockets are only just "tacked" together so that they remain in the right order and orientation while off the body. The body provides the strength to hold them. If, on the other hand, you notice that the sprockets slide up and down the body ...


5

It means the bearings are loose. (The main bearings, not the freewheel bearings.) It could be they're worn, but it's also likely that at some point in maintaining the bike you accidentally unscrewed one of the cups. I'd suggest you take it to a bike shop. They should be able to fix it in about 3 minutes (though there's some danger that the bearings are ...


5

Short answer. Hub integrity can not really be judged by noise alone, but by feel. If you feel it slipping under load the hub could be damaged beyond repair. The quiet smooth feel, but working normally is just a good, sealed hub that the manufacturer built in a way that has smaller or less splines. The full monty. A free wheel hub consists of a few key ...


5

the 14t, 15t, etc. is the number of teeth. You currently have a 16 tooth or 16t freewheel. More teeth and the easier to spin, but the slower it spins. Think of teeth on the rear cog as inverse to ease...lower numbers take more power to move; higher numbers take relatively less power. You want to find a good mix that allows you to make it up whatever hills ...


5

No, it is not a good idea. You'd be spending more than the bike is worth even for a basic internal gear hub (even assuming you got the wheel rebuilt for free using the existing rim and spokes, if possible), let alone buying a rear wheel with an IGH built in. You do need a chain tensioning pulley or horizontal dropouts, which while can be built more robustly ...


4

The freewheel allows forward pedalling to lock and drive the bike, but spins freely when reversed. Some BMX style bikes (and kids bikes) have coaster brakes, where if you pedal backwards (well usually they do not actually pedal backwards, just the motion is begun) and it brakes the bike. I remember well locking the back wheel and trying to generate skid ...


4

It very much depends on the freewheel mechanism in the hub, some make a nice "clickerty" noise, others are more silent. The hub will be sealed and this should prevent dirt etc. getting into the mechanism. If anything it is likely to get noisier with penetration by dirt & grit rather than quieter. Looking at the bike spec, my experience of Shimano hubs ...


4

This sounds like either the freehub on the rear wheel, if you have the newer cassette style, or the freewheel, if you have the older thread on design, needs to be replaced. These parts contain the pawls which drive the wheel forward when you pedal. If the pawls are broken, or simply not engaging the hub shell, you will pedal with no forward movement. See ...


4

The 14/28 is the number of teeth on the smallest and largest cog of the cassette. From your description you want to make at least the second number smaller, possibly the first number. As long as your replacement says that it's Shimano compatible (and 7 speed), you should be fine. Count the teeth on the cog that has the most teeth that you actually ...


4

I had the same problem (48x38x28 chainset). It turned out that MF-TZ21 is actually not a 'cassette', but a 'freewheel'. Your options for that are very limited: In the UK, Raleigh is distributing a 7 speed 13-24T model for less than 10 quid. SunRace is still producing 7 speed freewheels, but the closed-spaced 12-?? model wasn't distributed in the UK: Check ...


4

I love ATF (Automatic Transmission Fluid) for freewheel (not free hub) lube. What I do is lift the bike-- if someone can help you with this, it's a bit easier-- so that you can rotate the pedals (and make the back wheel spin). Ideally, the bike should be tilted to the non-drive side about 45-60 degrees. With the back wheel rotating, you can see where to ...


4

Police / Law Enforcement bikes often have a quiet freehub. This Cannondale Law Enforcement bicycle refers to it as a "Silent Clutch Rear Hub" and specifically mentions "R085" as a model number (further googling suggests it's a Shimano).


3

The answer is in the question - freewheel, not freehub or cassette. You will be needing the tool and a vice (or huge adjustable spanner). Remember to put the skewer or wheel nuts loosely on to hold the removal tool in place whilst you give it the initial heave-ho. Thereafter take the skewer/nut off. If you don't want to do it/fork out for the tool then ask ...


3

If this is a single-speed bike (no shifting mechanism) then the rear hub is probably seized up and needs to be overhauled or replaced. The hubs are designed to be overhauled by ten-year-olds (at least this ten-year-old did so, many decades ago) using ordinary tools, so they're not particularly complicated if you're mechanically inclined (or have a friend ...


3

"Vibration" could indicate a bad chain angle or a misadjusted derailer. On the other hand, it's typical to have smoothest operation near the middle of the cluster and some very slight noise/vibration higher and lower. Hard to say whether you have a problem or not without knowing the precise nature and severity of what you're experiencing. Note that a ...


3

You don't need to buy NOS. 7 speed cassettes are still manufactured, we stock them and they start at $20 all the way up to $36 for a Shimano HG50 which comes in 12-28. Go with a matching Shimano HG50 chain. Unless you buy a new rear wheel, you cannot go above 7 speed. 7 speed freehub bodies are shorter than 8+ speed freehub bodies. An 8+ speed cassette is ...


3

You may actually have one of a few problems. The problem that comes with biking in the snow/ice is not only moisture, but salt, and other road debris/grime that can get into your chain or derailleur. Leaving your bike outside, covered not, is a guaranteed way to corrode your parts as the moisture in the air gets into your frame, cable housings, bearings, any ...


3

To follow up on Tha Riddla's answer: If your freewheel is freewheeling in both directions, in all likelihood it is gummed up inside and the pawls are stuck open. (As a small note: the freewheel is separate from the hub and contains bearings, pawls, springs, and some lubricant.) You can either try to overhaul the freewheel or purchase a new one (they range ...


3

Really any 6 speed freewheel will work. You'll want to get the tooth numbers close, but they don't have to be exact (your 14-28 will be a fine replacement.) Chain sizing for 6-7-8 speed drivetrains hasn't been significantly changed since they became popular, though the profiles and faces of the freewheel cog teeth have, in most brands, been altered to ...


3

My son wanted to change his freewheel/cassete hub to a freecoaster hub so I did some research about 6 months ago and found this great YouTube video from Odyssey and RideBMX magazine all about freecoaster hubs. As you said, the cranks will not move when coasting backwards. For my son, this is the real advantage and why he wanted the hubs. Landing a 180 out ...


3

Since you have friction shifters and an 8/9 speed derailleur, you should be able to pop a 9 speed cassette on the back and use the full range. You'll have to re-adjust your limit screws of course. Worst case, if that doesn't work, you may be able to remove one of the small cogs and space it out to use only 8 speeds. The font chainrings will also likely be ...



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