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It is a freewheel. You will need the appropriate freewheel tool. The tool typically won't fit without removing the axle. You may also need the correct cone wrenches. This makes it a good time to service the wheels bearings as well. You may want to consult your LBS and compare the cost of having it done versus purchasing the tools you may only use once.


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Since the cassette is being driven by the wheel, the freehub mechanism is catching instead of releasing. Confirm that by removing the rear wheel, remove the cassette, and spin the wheel/freehub off the bike (ie in your hands) When powering it through the freehub the wheel should turn like normal, but as soon as the freehub is not driving the wheel, it ...


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Take your rear wheel off and visually inspect the cassette. Compare with this answer http://bicycles.stackexchange.com/a/21406/19705 and see which you have. Given bikepedia says 8 speed, its most likely to be a cassette. This is a freehub with a cassette. Note the ring of indentations just inside where it says 12T. That silver ring will unscrew ...


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This is a irritatingly common problem. The solution is fairly straightforward once you confirm that there is no foreign objects causing the hub to catch, which doesn't sound like the case. Solution: Remove the wheel from the bike, and remove the cassette, the axle, bearings, metal dustcover and wipe the interior of the hub clean of grease. If you've got ...


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The performance aero wheels are loud. These companies employ the best engineers, and I am sure they are aware of the noise they create. It's marketing. You can hear a Zipp wheel being pushed through a parking lot. I think it is a lot like loud mufflers on a car. I am Mustang, hear me roar! There are two major styles for freehubs and they relate to bearing ...



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