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10

If you take the back wheel off you should be able to examine the freewheel/cassette to determine which it is. Here is a picture of some common types. If yours doesn't look like one in the picture, post a close up and I'm sure someone here can identify it.


9

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


8

From personal experience, having just changed to a cassette with less range, I have to say that smaller steps definitely offers some advantage. I went from an 8-speed 11-32 to a 12-23. Having a single tooth of difference between adjacent gears means that it's more likely that you will be in the "right gear". The "right gear" is the gear in which you aren't ...


6

The first thing to note is "Does the 8 speed hub clear the dropouts ?" You may be able to spread the frame if steel. Since you're likely going from a 120mm to 130 mm (which is 2 sizes - 120->126->130), you should be cold setting it. The second question would be "Can the brakes reach the rim?" Unfortunately, to my knowledge, nobody makes a 5 speed ...


5

I'm betting that you need to install a brand new chain and a brand new freewheel / cassette, at the same time, and out of an abundance of caution, make sure they're the same brand. I doubt your friend actually ruined anything, the more likely scenario is that the chain is old and stretched, causing it to slip ( or it's the wrong length as Daniel mentioned ). ...


4

The high and low limit screws don't affect the shifting between the cogs - they just tell the derailleur not to throw the chain into the spokes or out into the frame. Theoretically, this is a set once and forget it adjustment. The B screw will keep the derailleur from rubbing on the cogs and should be set on the largest rear cog. If you put in the same ...


4

Something to keep in mind, it's not unusual for a SRAM chain to not play well with a Shimano cassette. A lot of times you'll get lucky and the two will work well together, I used to run SRAM chains with my Shimano cassettes all the time without much trouble. But there are just some combinations that just cause problems, even intermittently from run to run. ...


3

I think you're confusing a fixed gear with a single speed. A single speed bike can have a fixed gear (the cranks must (things the pedals are attached to) turn whenever the rear wheel turns), or a freewheel (you can coast, i.e. not have the cranks turn when the rear wheel turns). Luckily, a lot of fixed gear bikes have so called flip-flop hubs, where one ...


3

Just because a wheel is buckled doesn't mean that it can't be fixed. You may want to take it to a bike shop. As for will the wheel fit, first note that you'll need 6 speed shifters unless you're using friction shifters. As for the wheel actually fitting, you need to check the hub spacing -- for example, 5 speed rear wheels for road bikes normally use 120 mm ...


3

Take it to your favorite IBD- they can explain and illustrate much better. They might even show you how to do a destructive freewheel removal! Since bikes age in "dog years", and the correct tool to remove it (thick -boss Shimano) hasn't been made since the '90's), your shop may not have the correct tool unless they have been around for a while. IBD ...


3

The ISO freewheel thread standard is 1.375" x 24tpi Most freewheels I have encountered have been ISO. Some hubs use "British" threading at 1.370" x 24tpi If you use an ISO freewheel on a British thread, it will work, but you should check there is enough thread engagement to avoid stripping the hub. The trials-oriented retailer TartyBikes suggests 9 thread ...


3

They lock up Pretend just 1 pawl and just 1 tooth. Crank is fixed - left and right chainring spin at same rpm. Hub is fixed - left and right pawl spin at same rpm. The green part is attached to the hub that is attached to the wheel. The teeth are attacked to the cogs that are attached to the chain. Gearing 2:1 left (higher faster) assume 32 ...


3

If the 30 is worn to the point its slipping and jumping, I would my guess the others must be due for replacement, along with the chain. Individual cogs tend to only be available in high quality gear, so a new cluster will probably cost less than a single cog. Replace the cluster and chain if you can afford it. If not, the cheapest way would be to get a ...


3

A 6 speed bike has 126 mm rear spacing while more modern wheels will need 130 mm rear spacing (which you can fix by cold setting the frame). If you're getting a new front wheel too, you will need to do this to the fork as well (likely). If you go 7 speed and up, you can get a cassette wheel, but if your Tempo has indexed shifting, you'll need to use friction ...


3

Clarification - I count 24 slots for a 24 spline removal tool, and not 25 as you state. Jumping off from there I suspect you may have a Normandy/Maillard freewheel which takes a Bicycle Research Tools CT-3 24 spline freewheel removal tool. Link to tool: http://www.bicycletool.com/normandymaillardfreewheeltool.aspx Here's a link to the Bikeforums thread ...


2

FWIW, that is a junior racing freewheel from back in the day. Juniors have a limited high gear ratio they can use. Now as to whether a corn cob ( that was the nickname for it in the USA) really helps or not, every racer certainly believes that they do. And with power meters you can prove it. All I know is that when you're suffering at the back, having just ...


2

Yes, the Park FR-1 (or something compatible) is your friend.


2

This is my mental experiment on this. The O.P. states he would install a bigger cog on the left, and a bigger chainring on the right, resulting on a higher (faster) gear ration on right side and a lower(slower) gear ratio on the left. Now, if the freewheel is installed normally (i.e. freewheeling on coast) then this happens: If the freewheel is on the ...


2

After thinking about this for awhile, I think this would work, albeit somewhat clumsily. It would operate similar to a retro-direct, except with no reversing for the second freewheel. You would have to use good quality freewheels to avoid having both of them engaging together and binding. To answer a commenter Blam: Just how would you expect it to ...


2

Before we get into axle breakage, let's discuss your axle spacing, which probably isn't going to work going from a 6spd to an 8spd cassette unless you install a new, longer axle with more spacers, and you'll need to re-dish the wheel slightly. In terms of breakage, I've seen all speeds of freewheel axles break over time. Freewheel hubs' axles are just more ...


2

As @Batman says, 2mm is VERY little clearance on a bike. It is more likely to be the frame flexing (more so the chain and seat stays) causing the tyre to move around a bit. I would see if there is a way to mount the stand a little further forward on its bracket. You want to create as much distance as you can between your stand and the tyre as possible. ...


2

Like all bikes, single speed and fixie bikes come in all differing qualities, from cheap, to reasonable to expensive. I think the only advantage if building one yourself is that you could save a lot of money on the frame and spend more on things like rims, hubs, and other components that will give you much more bang for your buck. That's not to estimate the ...


2

This is not a 'legitimate' reason to avoid quick releases. Just like anything in life, there are low and high quality offerings, and there is good and bad luck. Your friend either has a low quality wheel or bad luck. The bar for quality on a BSO is pretty low, so even if his is nicer than yours, it might still not be high quality. All my wheels besides ...


1

You're basically going to have to do destructive freewheel removal on that. As for which freewheel to choose, check the threading when you get it off, and buy a 5 speed freewheel (chances are any 5 speed freewheel you have is ISO threaded and will probably work). The only company that I know of that still makes them is Sunrace.


1

6 speed spacing is 126mm wide measured from the outside of the locknuts. It's easiest to measure with calipers. However, you can add or remove spacers and possibly install a longer or shorter axle to get that spacing. I bought Campagnolo hubs "back in the day" that came as 6 speed hubs and eventually ran them with 8 speed freewheels, using longer axles ...


1

All freewheel hubs have the same thread and are compatible with single, 5, 6, 7 and maybe some 8 speed freewheels. Position of the hub is set by dishing of the wheel and spacers on the axle. It's an interesting question. But I think that you should worry more about the rear spacing. 6 speed modern freewheel is not considered to be wide comparing to ones with ...


1

I have done the six to eight conversion on an older road bike. By the way I have broken two seven speed rear mountain bike axles. So it does happen. I went with a mountain size (14-32) gear range. I added flat bars and rapid fire shifters. The larger gear range allows me to climb easier than the old 12-25 freewheel did. As @joelmdev stated, I did change the ...


1

I had this issue last week. Have a look at your rear derailleur and check it can go through the whole range of movement. Its possible that the spring has gone or the hanger for the jockey wheels has seized and won't move correctly. If this is the case try some degreaser on it, dry and add lube. If you still have the problem it may be easiest to replace the ...


1

I don't think old freewheels are "better" by default. While it's true that most of today's thread-on freewheels are junk, that doesn't promote the junk of yesteryear to "desirable" status. However, perhaps the median quality level was higher back in the day. In the days before freehubs, freewheels, like most things, ranged from the downright awful to the ...


1

Yes that is as single speed freewheel and those two pieces should not stick There are some serviceable freewheels (White) but they are expensive Pretty sure you need to replace the freewheel Based on the rust it looks old If you remove it from the bike and it sticks then for sure you need to replace it You can try spraying a lubricant in the grove but most ...



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