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7

You can buy a flip hub rear wheel where one side is fixed, the other free (Some bikes even come with them). You just take the wheel off, flip sides and put it back on. Brakes will depend on the frame but most frames allow for the installation of brakes. For the rear brake, you'll just have run full cable housing along the frame with either wire ties or cable ...


6

That's a freehub body. Look on the hub for the model of hub you have, and then you can use that to find the appropriate freehub body model by looking at the documentation of the hub.


5

While it may be possible, by creating a mechanism that shifts the chain from one freewheel to another, or disconnecting one temporarily through mechanical actuators, the hassle and engineering it would take to make happen would be outweighed by the fact that it is almost entirely pointless. A fixed gear would be your best bet as it already does that. ...


4

SRAM Cassettes are compatible with Shimano Cassettes, but a cassette and a freewheel are different components. You will not be able to use the SRAM Cassette to replace your Shimano Freewheel. You will need to replace your freewheel with a freewheel. The difference between a cassette and a freewheel is that a cassette is just a bunch of cogs that slides ...


3

What you call screws are really axle nuts. Fortunately your hub appears to contain sealed cartridge bearings, so there are no cups or cones to tweak up. The axle nuts should be done up close to the bearings and then locked in place against each other. Your frame has horizontal dropouts so try sliding the axle back a bit to see if that provides enough ...


3

You've answered your own question. It all comes down to cable pull, so use an accurate measuring tool like a vernier caliper, and see exactly how much cable is pulled per click. Use a dot of white-out ("twink") to help measure accurately. The cable itself is quite irrelevant, its the shifter on the handlebar that does the stepping, and the deraileur has a ...


3

If you have a freewheel (which it seems like you have on the BSO), and theres anything wrong with it, the solution is to replace it (if those directions don't work, you can try this method). In general, they're not user serviceable parts. My guess is that you have some pawls stuck or something. A stopgap measure that might work is dumping wd-40 or similar ...


3

Found a few sources by searching on "compact 7-speed freewheel" – here is what Sheldon Brown / Harris Cyclery has. The claim is that they will work, perhaps with the addition of a thin washer or two if the clearance is tight around your dropouts. The appear to have new (or maybe NOS) Sunrace FW760 (13-25), and Shimano FW722 (13-28), and a FW723 (14-34) ...


2

Freewheels do require lubrication sometimes. I suspect that if you drip some oil (I've used air tool oil, which is pretty light, but anything will be OK) in there with the bike tilted so the is freewheel up the pawls with become unstuck and it will work fine. In my experience it won't take much oil or time, it should free right up if lubrication actually ...


2

A warped frame will not cause wobble when the wheel is moved by hand. A warped frame can cause wobble when riding at speeds since the wheel is not straight. However, if the wheel has play (moves side to side without rotating) in the frame, then the hub is not properly adjusted or is damaged. The noise issues could be from any number places and should ...


2

That doesn't look like a screw on freewheel hub, that's an 8 speed freehub designed for a slide on cassette. I have the same one. Its the older design called Exa drive. When Campagnolo went to 9 speed the shape of the spines were changed and made deeper. This is why your conversions kit doesnt work , as its designed for the newer style freehubs. See the page ...


2

It seems like the first question to answer here is: freewheel vs. cassette. The, assumed, age of the wheel and being a 6-speed does suggest that it's a freewheel. However, even if it is an original wheel from the late '70s it is not out of the question that it could be a cassette (at least according to Wikipedia). Looking at the parts, I see several clues ...


2

The easiest thing may be to just think of it as applying the same exact force that you would be if you were riding the bike...


2

There could be a multitude of reasons, Does it rub consistently or does the wheel appear to have a wobble to it when spun where it makes contact once every turn in the same spot. You really should take it to a shop to have it looked at. The inner nut on the axle closest to the hub bearing should not have been loosened with the other one and could cause ...


2

I can think of three things to cause your problem. The tire is to large for the frame, the chain is too short. Can you post a side view photo of the rear axle with the wheel installed on the bike? The third option is that you didn't slide the axle far enough back. The additional photo will help narrow the option.


2

Short answer: NO, there are quite a lot of pre-built wheels made for use on older bikes (or new ones) that come set up for a freewheel rather than a cassette. There is a US based company called Wheel Master that most shops can get. I see you're in Canada but I still think you should be able to get them from a shop. I would not suggest trying to rebuild ...


1

I have a similarly old 1975 Peugeot Mixte UO18. I replaced the back wheel with a 700C Dimension Road Rear Wheel with Shimano 2200 hub and put a SRAM PG950 9-speed Cassette (SR-PG950-34) on it. Buying a readymade built wheel was much cheaper than trying to reclaim the old hub. Two things: I had to stretch the frame a bit to fit the 9-speed hub. Our ...


1

In short, no. Bad idea. But if you get lucky a couple of times, yes, it could work like you want. 8spd freewheels cost about the same as 7spds, so not much risk in 'going for it' and failing. Realistically, stick to 7 spd and upgrade the RD for the extra capacity to deal with the big cog if you must... but I'd try it out first, they usually ship long cage ...


1

Yes - 24 to 34 is a big jump, but in practice it just takes another half to one second to complete the shift. Also helps that you'll be riding relatively slowly by the time you want that gear, probably ~10 km/h and likely half that speed. A freewheel is not cheap but is not ridiculously expensive either. You should buy one, fit it, and try it out.


1

Yes - chains can be broken and will also wear quicker when under stress from low gearing. I have snapped a almost new KMC chain while on a 15% climb. I would have been in 26/42 on a 26" MTB. Fortunately I was going very slow. The pedals spun, so I clamped on brakes while unclipping. The slope meant I couldn't reach the ground straight below the seat, ...


1

If I don't ride hard, is it ok to use an 8 speed freewheel? Here are two answers: No, because a person who asks this question clearly understands the risks. The fact that someone who understands the risks is asking the internet whether the person should assume those risks indicates that the person is not capable of judging (or is uncertain of his ...


1

What I think you are saying is that when you stand beside the bike and push it side-to-side you can see the wheel wobble. That sounds to me like the bearings in the rear hub need to be adjusted. They don't need to be far out for it to cause significant movement at the rim.


1

You'd need to replace the hub (i.e. build the wheel with a new hub -- typically, its better to just get a new wheel), and then respace the frame (i.e. coldset) to take the new hub. It's easy still to find freewheels, so I'd recommend you just replace the freewheel.


1

I noticed this as well. In my experience, on higher end road bikes, the cassette that you put on the freehub body makes the most audible difference, versus the actual inner-workings of the freehub itself in most cases, i.e. normal, ratchet style freehub body. Example: I went from a Sram PG-1130 cassette to a PG-1170 recently. The lower end cassette ...


1

this week should be the litmus test. i had to order a freewheel removal tool (Maillard 40 mm x 24 notch if memory serves) and i have found 2 companies* that might have the parts i need. i've had to put it down for a couple of days and take a deep breath. i'll regroup and go at it again when the remover arrives. Bike Tools Etc. & Loose Screws Bicycle ...


1

Freewheel skipping is a very common occurrence when the temperature drops below -25c. Just bring it inside for a few minutes and you will be able to catch a cog on the freewheel or whatever it needs to catch inside. Once peddling never let up on the pressure of each stroke. Never coast. Pedal as you brake to a stop. Then it will stay engaged. I found ...


1

From the comments above, it seems that it really is a free wheel that is making the noise. Apparently cheap free wheels can be like that. Lubing them can help. This discussion has some extra info: http://forums.roadbikereview.com/fixed-single-speed/fix-shimano-freewheel-clunking-noises-150432.html TL;DR version: Get some gear oil or grease gun and apply ...



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