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10

If you take the back wheel off you should be able to examine the freewheel/cassette to determine which it is. Here is a picture of some common types. If yours doesn't look like one in the picture, post a close up and I'm sure someone here can identify it.


8

The point is efficiency. Cyclists actually have quite a narrow optimal power band. Most of us can bang away at a cadence of 50 rpm, up to about 90 rpm. Some of us pedal faster - 90 to 120 rpm. At those lower cadences (50) it feels like we're producing lots of power and at the high cadences it feels like we're just breezing along. But that is confusing ...


8

From personal experience, having just changed to a cassette with less range, I have to say that smaller steps definitely offers some advantage. I went from an 8-speed 11-32 to a 12-23. Having a single tooth of difference between adjacent gears means that it's more likely that you will be in the "right gear". The "right gear" is the gear in which you aren't ...


6

The first thing to note is "Does the 8 speed hub clear the dropouts ?" You may be able to spread the frame if steel. Since you're likely going from a 120mm to 130 mm (which is 2 sizes - 120->126->130), you should be cold setting it. The second question would be "Can the brakes reach the rim?" Unfortunately, to my knowledge, nobody makes a 5 speed ...


6

The hub is the body at the center of the wheel containing the axle. It is more or less just some bearings in a pair of cups that rotate around the axle. The freewheel is the mechanism that locks when pedaling forward (forcing the wheel to be driven by the chain) and spins freely when coasting or pedaling backward. These are two variations on freewheel ...


5

No, it is not a good idea. You'd be spending more than the bike is worth even for a basic internal gear hub (even assuming you got the wheel rebuilt for free using the existing rim and spokes, if possible), let alone buying a rear wheel with an IGH built in. You do need a chain tensioning pulley or horizontal dropouts, which while can be built more robustly ...


5

I'm betting that you need to install a brand new chain and a brand new freewheel / cassette, at the same time, and out of an abundance of caution, make sure they're the same brand. I doubt your friend actually ruined anything, the more likely scenario is that the chain is old and stretched, causing it to slip ( or it's the wrong length as Daniel mentioned ). ...


4

The high and low limit screws don't affect the shifting between the cogs - they just tell the derailleur not to throw the chain into the spokes or out into the frame. Theoretically, this is a set once and forget it adjustment. The B screw will keep the derailleur from rubbing on the cogs and should be set on the largest rear cog. If you put in the same ...


4

Something to keep in mind, it's not unusual for a SRAM chain to not play well with a Shimano cassette. A lot of times you'll get lucky and the two will work well together, I used to run SRAM chains with my Shimano cassettes all the time without much trouble. But there are just some combinations that just cause problems, even intermittently from run to run. ...


4

Its likely disassembles in one of two ways: two cone wrenches (one on each side of the hub) to remove the jam nuts. This is the likely option. From your photo it looks like there is a flat spot on the jam nut. two hex wrenches (one on each side of the hub) that fit into the axle end. Two videos demonstrating these techniques: http://aol.it/15nYDub ...


3

If the 30 is worn to the point its slipping and jumping, I would my guess the others must be due for replacement, along with the chain. Individual cogs tend to only be available in high quality gear, so a new cluster will probably cost less than a single cog. Replace the cluster and chain if you can afford it. If not, the cheapest way would be to get a ...


3

The ISO freewheel thread standard is 1.375" x 24tpi Most freewheels I have encountered have been ISO. Some hubs use "British" threading at 1.370" x 24tpi If you use an ISO freewheel on a British thread, it will work, but you should check there is enough thread engagement to avoid stripping the hub. The trials-oriented retailer TartyBikes suggests 9 thread ...


3

They lock up Pretend just 1 pawl and just 1 tooth. Crank is fixed - left and right chainring spin at same rpm. Hub is fixed - left and right pawl spin at same rpm. The green part is attached to the hub that is attached to the wheel. The teeth are attacked to the cogs that are attached to the chain. Gearing 2:1 left (higher faster) assume 32 ...


3

Not something I do often enough to worry about, but certainly a 'problem' I also have.... One solutiojn that comes to mind is write "Install" and "Remove" in the side of the handle you can see when installing and removing (My luck would be I would get it wrong way round).


3

I think you're confusing a fixed gear with a single speed. A single speed bike can have a fixed gear (the cranks must (things the pedals are attached to) turn whenever the rear wheel turns), or a freewheel (you can coast, i.e. not have the cranks turn when the rear wheel turns). Luckily, a lot of fixed gear bikes have so called flip-flop hubs, where one ...


2

If we use the Sheldon Brown Gear Calculator set to metres development (although any other unit will work adequately), we see that the range for a 39-53 x 34-11 system is 2.5 to 10.4 metres developed per crank revolution, yielding an overall range of 416%. The widest range options from various companies are the Shimano Alfine 11 hub, which has a range of ...


2

Some good guidelines are here, courtesy of Sheldon Brown. Assuming you have the right freehub body for Shimano/SRAM-style cassettes on the FTS-X, you just (probably) need a 4.5mm spacer behind the cassette.


2

If your rims are bending under normal loads there are a couple of things you should check and maintain: Tire Pressure: Running at the higher range of pressure for your tires will help you avoid bending the rims when you hit holes or other obstacles. Wider Tires: If your brake clearance supports it, you can run slightly wider tires. This will give you a ...


2

sounds like your chainrings are worn. Look at the rings and see if they are "shark fin" shaped rather than symmetrical - a google image search for "worn out chainring" will show examples including some really, really worn out rings. The old worn out chain likely wore out the rings as well. I've had exactly what you're describing on a couple bikes and it ...


2

Since this was mentioned in a comment, freewheels are not the same as freehubs+cassettes (see http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html) for details. The rest of the discussion should hold if freewheel is replaced with cassette+freehub though with minor modifications - I don't know if this bike has a freewheel or a cassette+freehub since I can't load the product ...


2

This is my mental experiment on this. The O.P. states he would install a bigger cog on the left, and a bigger chainring on the right, resulting on a higher (faster) gear ration on right side and a lower(slower) gear ratio on the left. Now, if the freewheel is installed normally (i.e. freewheeling on coast) then this happens: If the freewheel is on the ...


2

After thinking about this for awhile, I think this would work, albeit somewhat clumsily. It would operate similar to a retro-direct, except with no reversing for the second freewheel. You would have to use good quality freewheels to avoid having both of them engaging together and binding. To answer a commenter Blam: Just how would you expect it to ...


2

I don't think 100kg should bend a decent axle. I have 7.000 km since I replaced my axle with a Point $5 one and it's still ok, on a freewheel 7-speed hub like yours. Definitely they should replace it on warranty. If not, you can replace only the axle with a better one.


2

Yes, the Park FR-1 (or something compatible) is your friend.


2

FWIW, that is a junior racing freewheel from back in the day. Juniors have a limited high gear ratio they can use. Now as to whether a corn cob ( that was the nickname for it in the USA) really helps or not, every racer certainly believes that they do. And with power meters you can prove it. All I know is that when you're suffering at the back, having just ...


2

Like all bikes, single speed and fixie bikes come in all differing qualities, from cheap, to reasonable to expensive. I think the only advantage if building one yourself is that you could save a lot of money on the frame and spend more on things like rims, hubs, and other components that will give you much more bang for your buck. That's not to estimate the ...


2

As @Batman says, 2mm is VERY little clearance on a bike. It is more likely to be the frame flexing (more so the chain and seat stays) causing the tyre to move around a bit. I would see if there is a way to mount the stand a little further forward on its bracket. You want to create as much distance as you can between your stand and the tyre as possible. ...


1

There is a technical difference between a cassette and a freewheel. A freewheel contains the ratcheting mechanism while a cassette sits on a freehub which contains the ratcheting mechanism. It clearly says in that toolkit's page "shimano cassette removal tool". The MF-TZ21 is a freewheel. So Park Tool FR-1 is the right tool. They also have excellent ...


1

(axle width) Maybe, there is a pretty good chance your bike is already at 130mm O.L.D. spacing. Road bikes would be at 120 or 126mm from that era, but a mid 80's MTB has a reasonable chance of being at 130mm. http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_n-o.html#old 2-3. All chains for geared bikes are 3/32 interior dimension, the difference between 7-11 speed is the ...


1

Maintaining a freewheel (especially the body) is a PITA and finding the right cog to do it is more trouble than its worth unless you're really attached to it for some reason. You could just not use the 30t cog, or throw on a new freewheel. If you really want to pursue this avenue, Sheldon has some words of advice (I'd probably start with grinding the teeth ...



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