Hot answers tagged

15

Depends on how "little" the accident was. First double-check that the handlebar really is "square" to the fork, and not slightly cocked one direction or the other. (Though this problem shouldn't cause the wheel to turn when you let go.) Next, oddly enough, do the same check with your seat. If the seat is slightly angled to one side or the other then it ...


11

A front derailer is a bit more complicated than it looks, and can be quite complex to adjust if you're starting from zero -- just having installed the unit. There are five (and a half) adjustments -- Height, sliding up and down the seat tube. Rotation around the seat tube. Low limit High limit Cable tightness Generally height is such that the derailer, ...


10

I think you need to separate operator error from optimal mechanical functioning. Mechanical advantage By your own anecdotal evidence you have demonstrated how powerful front brakes can be. In short we have front brakes because they are the most powerful brake. When a bike (or any vehicle) decelerates weight is shifted to the front wheel. Because ...


8

There are more factors than just the front brake that contribute to the flipping accident. I myself got into the accident once. It happens so fast that you never have time to lean your body backwards and provide more tractions for the rear wheel like other have stated. I should list some of the factors that contribute to the 'flipping'-style accidents: ...


7

Proviso - my advise presumes you are not looking at forking out $2K or more for a bike, and probably significantly less. At a high price point I might suggest suspension. I also presume the gravel section is well maintained with average (pea - grape) size gravel (Where I ride, we sometime use logging roads, the "gravel" is stones about 2"-3" across.), and ...


7

What I worry about mainly is the horizontal alignment of the wheels and brakes (V brakes or disks). In my experience just pressing fork down on the wheels will then "auto fit" which creates an horizontally accurate alignment. I press from the handlebars vertically to the ground and the wheel keeps an horizontal alignment with the brakes (accurately set). ...


7

So what do we need front brakes for? We need them for maximum braking efficiency and better control of the bike. Your question is flawed in the sense that it only has anecdotes from unskilled riders. Let's see some similar examples of equipment misuse: why do we have a rear brakes? They are not efficient and last time a friend of mine used it, the ...


6

Most likely cause if the disc and pads are contaminated. What did you wash it with? Many cleaners leave a residue. Worst case the pads need replacing. The discs should be well cleaned before installing new pads - Use a solvent such as brake cleaner, methylated spirits or Isoprop alcohol, and rub the discs to be certain no contamination is left on them. ...


6

We have front brakes in order to stop. In an emergency stop there is hardly any weight on the rear tire, and the rear wheel has very little traction. In each of these cases, the bike would not have stopped where it did, and there are certainly situations where rolling further would be more dangerous. There is a proper technique which is get back and low, ...


6

Yes - one or two torque arms will help. Otherwise all the impulse is being send through your dropouts, which will be steel and will flex. This undoes the wheel nuts over time. This also fretts out the dropouts whih will cost you a new fork. Do you have anti-rotation washers in the fork dropouts too? Even my 250W motor needed them. More info: From ...


5

Wow what a horrible guide. Tightening the gear cable while in the highest front gear is very tough and will only hurt your fingers. I recommend putting the front dérailleur into the lowest gear and tightening it that way. This is much easier! As for your specific problem, in all my experience you can never not get 'rubbing' (if by rubbing you mean the ...


5

The fork is "right" if it has the right "sag", that is, if it lowers a bit when you get on the bike. The right sag is no less than 10%, no more than 25% of total travel, for a regular bike (non-downhill, non-special-purpose); Basically three "areas" must be addressed on maintenance: Cleaning the inside, for removal of old oil/grease, water, mud, grime, ...


5

I'd take a close look at your dropout and your QR skewer. The rotating disc exerts an upward force on the disc caliper, which tends to want to push the dropout up and away from the axle (or as normally stated, pushes the axle down and out of the dropout). Some calculations at Jules & James' comprehensive site computes the force generated to be as much ...


4

Since the accepted answer consists only of a broken link (which is why link-only answers are so awful) and this question is ranked high by google, here's a late answer. Park Tool list a number of common sizes. 3/8 inch x 24 tpi Some solid axle bikes, including coaster brake 3/8 inch x 26 tpi Solid rear axle 10mm x 1mm Most quick release rear ...


4

Carbon compound can definitely help. As the following link points out, it helps you avoid 'over torquing' to ensure that the component doesn't slip. http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/fiber_grip.htm In my personal domain, if there is carbon and carbon, or carbon and some other material, thou must use fiber grip. And a torque wrench. No questions.


4

This biggest difference is the top (Kona) is a Dual Crown fork where as the bottom image has a Single Crown fork. Dual crowns are generally found on downhill mountain bikes. The style has been copied down to department store bikes as well, but don't let the look fool you those forks are still only as good as what you paid for them. For a while, there were ...


4

Rear derailleurs don't care whats up in front and vice versa. Rear derailleurs don't care about the number of cogs in the back, but front derailleurs care about the number of chain rings (you can get a triple derailleur to play nice with a double chainring, but you should probably get the right part to begin with). Speeds are mostly marketing though, as ...


4

You might have a hard time finding the exact same part that was originally on the bike. However, front derailleur is a pretty standard piece of kit and you can replace it with compatible. Things you need to look for when buying front mech: Road and MTB FDs are different Shimano and SRAM FDs work with the others shifters (which is different for RDs) ...


4

If you already adjusted the front derailleur, there is not much to do. As you wrote yourself, the distance between crank arm and chainring is too small for your derailleur. Ask Rotor about compatible derailleurs. The main reason to have derailleur not touch is not noise. The derailleur scratches the crank, which creates a starting point for cracks.


3

Another check not mentioned yet: The bearing in the head tube may have been bashed giving you a point which the handlebars prefer to remain in. I had this happen with an older bike and as this point was slightly off to one side, the handlebars would end up moving to that spot if I tried taking my hands off, which meant it could not be ridden hands free. ...


3

Have you looked at the instructions for the derailleur? If not, it might help. If the bike is a recent purchase, have you contacted BD? I'm not sure they will be able to help (how recent is a "recent purchase?"), but you have nothing to lose. Your other alternative would be to go with the bike to a local bike shop, and let them repair it. It won't be free, ...


3

My SORA front derailleur cable broke (after gear change difficulties for several tens of kilometres, and ineffective cable length adjustments). I replaced the cable, but I still had to push the gear change lever very hard to change chain wheels (which is when I found this web page). The culprit was the plastic cable guide screwed onto the frame under the ...


3

Unfortunately, you should be using a 11 speed Shimano road FD with a 11 speed road Shimano shifter. SRAM will have cable pull issues. According to Zinn, "a Shimano 11-speed shifter will not work well with a 10-speed front derailleur because the 11-speed shifter is designed to actuate the longer lever arm of Shimano 11-speed front derailleurs." so that cuts ...


3

What information is available on these models make it appears to be an lower cost Big Box Store quality bike. It has non descript components. These bikes typically have a very simple suspension. The shocks consist of a spring and plastic sleeves that act as bushings. The dampening rate can be adjusted by removing the plastic caps on the fork crown and ...


3

First you should make sure your "high limit screw" is loose enough. This may be marked H on the derailleur, or it may be one of two adjacent unmarked screws. By loosening this you allow the derailleur to travel a bit more outboard. Then, using some combination of adjusting the cable tension with the clamp bolt and with the barrel adjuster, set the tension ...


2

Could be 5/16" which is very close to M8 (7.9375mm vs. 8mm). Thread might be UNF 24 (24 threads per inch) or British Cycle Std. at 26 threads per inch. There are even some that are metric in terms of diameter but use BSC for thread spacing! If it's 5/16" at 26 threads per inch then an M8-1.00 nut may fit since 25.4 tpi is very close to 26 tpi and 7.9mm ...


2

The bottom of the front cage on your front derailleur should be about 2mm higher than the chain ring, when the derailleur has no cable tension. That is, when it is in the smallest front gear position. On Bio-pace rings, that doesn't change. but it must be measured at the point when the chain ring comes closest to the derailleur cage. (The hardest part of ...


2

Depends on the bike, but a common problem is that your fork and handlebars are out of alignment. This is more common on older bikes that don't use a threadless headset. It used to happen to me frequently. If you have an older bike with a threaded headset and fork, you can just loosen the bolt at the top of the stem, adjust the bars so they line up with the ...


2

Maybe you have bended fork, so now your right fork blade is little behind left blade? Or maybe you have dented something in headset?


2

They ride the paris roubaix on road bikes, and that is a lot of cobblestone. You can get away with 2 miles of gravel without suspension. Don't go overkill on this. You can ride gravel on fat tires and no suspension. You don't even need a mountain bike. Get a touring, cyclocross, or hybrid bike with cantilever, disc, or mini-v brakes and put some 35mm or ...



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