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14

Depends on how "little" the accident was. First double-check that the handlebar really is "square" to the fork, and not slightly cocked one direction or the other. (Though this problem shouldn't cause the wheel to turn when you let go.) Next, oddly enough, do the same check with your seat. If the seat is slightly angled to one side or the other then it ...


11

A front derailer is a bit more complicated than it looks, and can be quite complex to adjust if you're starting from zero -- just having installed the unit. There are five (and a half) adjustments -- Height, sliding up and down the seat tube. Rotation around the seat tube. Low limit High limit Cable tightness Generally height is such that the derailer, ...


7

Proviso - my advise presumes you are not looking at forking out $2K or more for a bike, and probably significantly less. At a high price point I might suggest suspension. I also presume the gravel section is well maintained with average (pea - grape) size gravel (Where I ride, we sometime use logging roads, the "gravel" is stones about 2"-3" across.), and ...


6

I think you need to separate operator error from optimal mechanical functioning. Mechanical advantage By your own anecdotal evidence you have demonstrated how powerful front brakes can be. In short we have front brakes because they are the most powerful brake. When a bike (or any vehicle) decelerates weight is shifted to the front wheel. Because ...


5

Most likely cause if the disc and pads are contaminated. What did you wash it with? Many cleaners leave a residue. Worst case the pads need replacing. The discs should be well cleaned before installing new pads - Use a solvent such as brake cleaner, methylated spirits or Isoprop alcohol, and rub the discs to be certain no contamination is left on them. ...


5

Wow what a horrible guide. Tightening the gear cable while in the highest front gear is very tough and will only hurt your fingers. I recommend putting the front dérailleur into the lowest gear and tightening it that way. This is much easier! As for your specific problem, in all my experience you can never not get 'rubbing' (if by rubbing you mean the ...


5

I'd take a close look at your dropout and your QR skewer. The rotating disc exerts an upward force on the disc caliper, which tends to want to push the dropout up and away from the axle (or as normally stated, pushes the axle down and out of the dropout). Some calculations at Jules & James' comprehensive site computes the force generated to be as much ...


5

So what do we need front brakes for? We need them for maximum braking efficiency and better control of the bike. Your question is flawed in the sense that it only has anecdotes from unskilled riders. Let's see some similar examples of equipment misuse: why do we have a rear brakes? They are not efficient and last time a friend of mine used it, the ...


5

We have front brakes in order to stop. In an emergency stop there is hardly any weight on the rear tire, and the rear wheel has very little traction. In each of these cases, the bike would not have stopped where it did, and there are certainly situations where rolling further would be more dangerous. There is a proper technique which is get back and low, ...


5

There are more factors than just the front brake that contribute to the flipping accident. I myself got into the accident once. It happens so fast that you never have time to lean your body backwards and provide more tractions for the rear wheel like other have stated. I should list some of the factors that contribute to the 'flipping'-style accidents: ...


4

The fork is "right" if it has the right "sag", that is, if it lowers a bit when you get on the bike. The right sag is no less than 10%, no more than 25% of total travel, for a regular bike (non-downhill, non-special-purpose); Basically three "areas" must be addressed on maintenance: Cleaning the inside, for removal of old oil/grease, water, mud, grime, ...


4

Carbon compound can definitely help. As the following link points out, it helps you avoid 'over torquing' to ensure that the component doesn't slip. http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/fiber_grip.htm In my personal domain, if there is carbon and carbon, or carbon and some other material, thou must use fiber grip. And a torque wrench. No questions.


4

You might have a hard time finding the exact same part that was originally on the bike. However, front derailleur is a pretty standard piece of kit and you can replace it with compatible. Things you need to look for when buying front mech: Road and MTB FDs are different Shimano and SRAM FDs work with the others shifters (which is different for RDs) ...


4

Rear derailleurs don't care whats up in front and vice versa. Rear derailleurs don't care about the number of cogs in the back, but front derailleurs care about the number of chain rings (you can get a triple derailleur to play nice with a double chainring, but you should probably get the right part to begin with). Speeds are mostly marketing though, as ...


4

This biggest difference is the top (Kona) is a Dual Crown fork where as the bottom image has a Single Crown fork. Dual crowns are generally found on downhill mountain bikes. The style has been copied down to department store bikes as well, but don't let the look fool you those forks are still only as good as what you paid for them. For a while, there were ...


3

Another check not mentioned yet: The bearing in the head tube may have been bashed giving you a point which the handlebars prefer to remain in. I had this happen with an older bike and as this point was slightly off to one side, the handlebars would end up moving to that spot if I tried taking my hands off, which meant it could not be ridden hands free. ...


3

Have you looked at the instructions for the derailleur? If not, it might help. If the bike is a recent purchase, have you contacted BD? I'm not sure they will be able to help (how recent is a "recent purchase?"), but you have nothing to lose. Your other alternative would be to go with the bike to a local bike shop, and let them repair it. It won't be free, ...


3

What I worry about mainly is the horizontal alignment of the wheels and brakes (V brakes or disks). In my experience just pressing fork down on the wheels will then "auto fit" which creates an horizontally accurate alignment. I press from the handlebars vertically to the ground and the wheel keeps an horizontal alignment with the brakes (accurately set). ...


2

The bottom of the front cage on your front derailleur should be about 2mm higher than the chain ring, when the derailleur has no cable tension. That is, when it is in the smallest front gear position. On Bio-pace rings, that doesn't change. but it must be measured at the point when the chain ring comes closest to the derailleur cage. (The hardest part of ...


2

Depends on the bike, but a common problem is that your fork and handlebars are out of alignment. This is more common on older bikes that don't use a threadless headset. It used to happen to me frequently. If you have an older bike with a threaded headset and fork, you can just loosen the bolt at the top of the stem, adjust the bars so they line up with the ...


2

Maybe you have bended fork, so now your right fork blade is little behind left blade? Or maybe you have dented something in headset?


2

They ride the paris roubaix on road bikes, and that is a lot of cobblestone. You can get away with 2 miles of gravel without suspension. Don't go overkill on this. You can ride gravel on fat tires and no suspension. You don't even need a mountain bike. Get a touring, cyclocross, or hybrid bike with cantilever, disc, or mini-v brakes and put some 35mm or ...


2

You need to loosen the screw that holds the cable and pull that cable out a little bit. The limiter screws that you've used so far are rather used to prevent the chain from falling off, and it's a finer tuning than you appear to need now. Thus it would be useful to level them out before pulling the cable. After you adjust the cable, take a few minutes to ...


2

As I see it, from my experience you may have any one or a combination of the following issues (from most to least likely): You keep on pedalling at force while shifting down. Usually, when you switch from the middle to the smallest ring on the front you are going uphill and you have to keep pedalling just to avoind falling over. Still, you have to ...


1

From your link, your bike has Tekro HDC Hydraulic brakes. If you do a google search, there is a video (made by Tekro by the looks of things) which talks about how to replace pads on these brakes. I suggest you watch this video. If you understand it, and feel comfortable doing what it suggests, take the pads out and examine them. Don't buy any replacements ...


1

If you compare new and old derailleurs, you'll see that the new ones have cages made from thinner metal, but stamped to make them torsionally rigid. Older ones like this Campagnolo FD have a nice flat low profile cage that works well with cranks that resemble the older Campy with low Q-factor and relatively straight crank arms. Of course vintage ...


1

There will be only very small differences in the widths different FDs (assuming you are talking about the inside to outside dimension). One that is designed to be minimum sized so that it provides a best fit for 46t large chainrings is Shimano's CX-70, intended for cyclo-cross: ...


1

The small chain ring is considered the first gear, so it goes 1-2-3. The derailleur spring pulls the derailleur always towards the smallest chain ring, which makes sense if the cable snaps during a ride: you could still get home without having to walk your bike on hilly terrain. If it was always on the big chain ring, you would need some serious legs ...


1

The cup marked L goes on the left-hand side of the frame (the non-drive side) and consequently the cup marked R goes on the right-hand side. Make sure you tighten the cups in the correct direction (the drive side cup is reverse threaded) and be sure not to cross thread the frame. As for the spacers, I presume that the frame has a bottom bracket width of 73 ...


1

The chain line expected by a double front derailleur is basically what comes with the largest two chain rings on a triple. Since you are using the smallest two chain rings, the double front derailleur will not shift optimally. Instead, I'd suggest keeping the triple front derailleur in place. Using the limit screw -- as you already have -- is the best ...



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