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11

Because: Long travel bikes have a particular geometry which only benefits descends. Applying long travel on an XC geometry bike will create a bike which is not good for anything. Long travel absorbs a lot of energy. XC riders would not like this. Long travel requires stronger construction to avoid flex. This means more weight.


8

Bouncyness* may not be the appropriate term for the behavior you need from your suspension. Suspension has two main functions: Shock Absorbing and Dampening. Shock absorbing is what the fork does by compressing, allowing the wheel to travel upwards. In this process, kinetic energy from the shock is used to compress either a coil spring or an air spring. ...


8

Although this isn't explicitly part of your question, I'll go ahead and throw it in as it's one of the most important factors to consider in terms of increased suspension if you plan on pedaling your bike- the basic principle behind propelling a bike is to convert a mostly downward force (pedaling) into forward momentum (the drivetrain turning the back wheel ...


8

This depends on technique, rather than equipment; Trials riders regularly drop several feet on rigid bikes. You should use your legs to absorb the shock of landing to reduce the work done by the suspension, just as you would when jumping down from a height without a bike.


7

The internet. Bike magazines. Bike shops. Your friends. Just as in any other industry there are good and bad brands. Good brands occasionally build awful bikes and vice versa. Read reviews, see the things in person, and test ride them. It's very difficult to buy a frame without a shock. They don't have to be custom made as such, but rather custom tuned. ...


7

Ask yourself this- would you buy a car off of Alibaba to save a few bucks, or would you fork over a little more money and buy a Honda/Toyota/whatever? Buy the name brand bike. If your Alibaba bike's headtube snaps off on a gnarly high speed descent, who's going to do something about it? Not Alibaba, and good luck getting the manufacturer from god knows ...


6

The biggest advantage of building your own bike is getting exactly what you want when you knew what you wanted from the git-go. Since you don't know what you want and admit to not really knowing what you're looking at, you're better off getting a built bike from a shop. Your first set of components are basically going to be an experiment. Those components ...


6

If you're riding in temperatures that are only a few degrees below zero, I wouldn't worry too much. As suggested elsewhere, make sure you keep a closer eye on maintenance (brushing off snow/ice, lubrication, etc). The colder it gets though, the greater the risk that drivetrain components will fail is higher, I had a free hub fail that way. I'd say that all ...


6

disadvantages : more weight (more material, more oil) more energy required in order to pedal the bike is less snappier because it "eats" some of the terrain, so dirt jumping tricks (e.g 360s, backflips, frontflips) are harder than on bikes with less suspension some people believe that more suspension is not appropriate when learning to ride MTB and ...


6

Yeah, the main issue is the geometry that determines the arc the wheel follows as it responds to upward force on the tire. Subtle changes in pivot points can affect that significantly. Beyond that the spring force and damping force that the shock applies at each point in the wheel arc is obviously also important. And differences in shock placement are one ...


6

The main issue is the load limits on those racks, and the second one is why those limits exist. The Thule Pack ’n Pedal Tour Rack is claimed to take 25kg, the Topeak seatpost mounted racks will take 9kg. Thule seem to be selling rebadged Freeload gear? I have seen a Thule rack fail with significantly less than 25kg on it, and while being ridden fairly ...


6

Put simply, a master of a craft will be better at it than a "jack of all trades". A dedicated cross country race bike will be better for XC racing than an All Mountain bike. The same would be true of the dedicated downhill race bike. An All Mountain bike strikes a compromise in the middle, making it a good choice for someone who wants to do a bit of ...


5

You're mixing up two different concepts. The damper, which is what slows things down. The spring, which is what holds the weight and absorbs shocks. The damper is usually hydraulic, oil being forced through a small hole. The spring is either a coil or pressurised air. Without a damper, you'll have a very bouncy ride and without a spring, you'll have a ...


5

Most fork manufacturers will actually suggest service based on Hours on the fork, I know Fox will suggest you breakdown and clean all seals and replace open bath oil systems every 30 hours ridden. Also most sealed gas dampers suggest you send them back to the manufacturer every X number of hours to have them rebuilt by the factory.


5

Your bike looks like it comes equipped with a full-suspension frame, and the suspension mechanism is located where one would usually attach the rack stays. This will make attaching a rear rack extremely difficult, and almost certainly less secure. I don't recommend attaching a rear rack to this bike, particularly not one that will be holding a child seat. ...


5

The pitch is a pretty good AM bike; I ride the enduro and I love it. It climbs ok, but can destroy really rocky, nasty trails. It also does really well on the FR terrain. While the enduro has evolved from when it was the same frame as the pitch, I think they would still be fairly comparable experiences. You might also want to check out the heckler (you can ...


5

Regarding how increased suspension adversely effects handling. The first consideration is that to accommodate the increased travel you must make the bike taller so that the pedal/chainrings don't hit the ground as you utilize the increased travel. This results in higher center of gravity and the accompanying adverse handling changes. Second; assuming there ...


5

Suspension isn't something that can broken down simply, but let's try. First, you're asking about two different scenarios: front suspension and full suspension. Both setups can range from as little as 80mm on a hard-tail dirt jumper to 210mm on a full downhill bike. Now, obviously, you're not going to want to grab your downhill bike to become the world's ...


5

Bike shops have a special test-bikes to be lent for a whole day or even a weekend. I tested Specialized, Scott and RB for the whole weekend this way. You will pay them a refundable deposit (20-80% of price of the bike - depends on the shop). Some of them will charge you a little for cleaning/service or whatever. This may vary across the countries; I have ...


5

In general, no, there is not a "a best suspension frame" (just as there is no best car, best breed of cat, or best person). There are loads of different suspension designs (single pivot, FSR, DW Link, Maestro, VPP, URT, iDrive, ABP, Switch, Pathlink, Droplink, to name only a few), each with their own distinct advantages and disadvantages. There are also a ...


5

Many first time cross racers use a mountain bike. It makes perfect sense, don't go out and spend $1500+ before you even know whether cyclocross is your cup of tea. Most all races allow mountain bikes, the only type of equipment that's usually forbidden is a fixed gear. A full suspension mountain bike will do just fine as an introductory race vehicle. Your ...


5

A few quick points about the article The author did not provide all the math and formulations so we need to take it on faith that the correct formulae were used and there are not implementation errors. The author also only considered one bike, the 2015 Giant Reign 27.5". Finally, the results seem reasonable to me. The main take home from the article ...


4

If you have air shocks, front or rear, be mindful of temperature impact on pressure. If you store your bike at about +20 C (room temperature) and ride it out into -10 to -20 C (seriously freezing weather), after a moment you will experience about 10% pressure drop in your shocks (and tires, too). While 10% is not much, it can cause a noticeable change in ...


4

This swing arm design has fallen into near complete disuse in the bicycle world for 2 reasons: First, there is translated suspension activation from pedaling. This design does not isolate pedaling or other rider generated forces from ground generated forces. Because of that, there is a loss of efficiency which makes it a poor choice for a bicycle ...


4

The reason for locking suspension uphill is efficiency converting the power you produce into forward momentum. If you are losing forward momentum by slipping, its because you have too much power going to the rear wheel. This needs to only be for a very short (instantaneous) burst. Once traction is lost, it takes a lot to regain it. Give this, there is no ...


3

Obviously, this depends on the make and model Even more obviously, it depends on riding conditions, mainly on how much mud and water the hardware is dealing with "Fully serviced" is also an imprecise term, manufacturers may indicate different service actions with different frequency By caring well for the shocks (mainly by cleaning off the mud, and ...


3

Basically, there are two abstract design parameters for a suspension system: trajectory of rear axle, and dynamic behavior (reaction force, damping) along this path. Both of these parameters are simultaneously determined by the kynematic chain composed by the passive links AND the shock. From single-pivot, suspension systems have evolved to 4-bar linkages ...


3

If you haven't done, so try playing with the tire pressures. Many riders assume that you need to inflate them to the maximum psi on the tire. If the pressure is too high the tires tend to bounce off of obstacles instead of rolling over them. If you are light enough, say less than 150 pounds you might be able to run the pressures at 25 or so psi. Set the ...


3

Yes there are a few full suspensions in that range, they will be heavy, and mid to low level parts. Saving a bit longer and waiting (hard i know) Maybe £1200 - 1500 would get you much further. Your current bike is 17kg. a £1000 bike may only save you 1 - 2 kg. A nice hard tail within your budget would be very light (12 - 13kg) Another option would be a ...


3

Any shock with an eye to eye length of 20.0 cm (7.9 in) and 5.0cm (2.0in) stroke will fit as a direct replacement for your shock. All the shocks available as OEM options on the 2005 Prohphet used these dimensions. Any different eye to eye length will alter the geometry of your bike. Any different stroke length will either reduce travel, or if risk damaging ...



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