Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

I don't have any experience with that particular unit, but I do have a Garmin Oregon 450, which is a "hiking" GPS, but I find it works great for cycling. I've found there's 2 important things to getting a lock on satellites. First, as you mention, is a clear view of the sky. The second important thing is don't move. The faster you are moving the more ...


8

Use Bike Route Toaster and make sure you are using Open Street Maps Cycling version ("Open Cycle Map). As part of the route finding options under Open Street Maps there is an "Avoid unpaved roads/paths" I have successfully used Bike Route Toaster with a Garmin 800 in the past. I planned out a 1000 km journey across Norway on back roads, gravel (eek!) ...


7

The map screen will show you your location, you aren't required to choose a route, routes are just big feature of the edge touring that Garmin focused on for that line.


5

Ever had that "this has to.... be the top.... oh sh$%.... it's a crest.... there's more...." feeling. Knowing altitude lets you pace your climb and arrive the the top without over (or under) doing it. Imagine riding flat roads without knowing speed or distance - it can be done, but to maximize training effort or race performance you need to know ...


5

The Edge Touring comes with a preloaded "Garmin Cycle Map". This is based on OpenStreetMap, so you can check the OSM website to see how good coverage is for the areas you are interested in. In general, OSM is rather good for roads in most of Western Europe, and much of the USA. Many areas also have lots of cycle paths and trails mapped. It is often more ...


4

I am not aware of a way to do this using just the Garmin unit. However, if you have a computer handy, then you can upload your ride to one of the many GPS cycling sites (for example, http://ridewithgps.com/ works well for this). Once the ride is online, you can reverse the route using tools on the website. You'll want to then verify that everything is as ...


4

It is probably worth switching on the device as soon as you start heading home, even if you are inside a building. While it may not acquire a lock inside, the signal might be strong enough to download some of the data the device has to acquire, meaning it locks quicker once you reach clearer skies. It's also worth bearing in mind that acquiring a GPS ...


4

Garmin do not publish the firmware or provide support for community modifications, and actually seem to be killing off the one community feature they had allowed (the ability to use non Garmin maps) in some areas. My advice - buy another device for the other bike, or just accept that navigating through 5 menus isn't really that bad:-)


4

I personally use a Garmin Edge 810 which can connect via Bluetooth to your smartphone and then automatically upload rides to Garmin Connect. The auto-transfer from Garmin Connect then allows your ride to appear in Strava almost immediately, however, this isn't without it's short-comings. As per my comment on Mac's answer, I have found the auto-upload ...


3

Yes, you should be able to use a Garmin Oregon that way. A Garmin Oregon can do almost anything that a Garmin Edge (GPS bike computer) can do. The exact details will depend a lot on exactly which Oregon and Edge models you're comparing. Most of the current Oregon models actually can connect to a heartrate or cadence sensor via ANT or Bluetooth. They can ...


3

You can also call up a pre-generated route and turn off the turn-by-turn directional functionality, thus just showing your location and relationship to the route. This has worked reasonably well for me.


3

Historical Contingency Looking to history earlier versions (e.g., Garmin Edge 305 and Edge 705) came with barometers for elevation. This was long before Strava, and during a time when you did all the analyses on your own computer. Some analysis software supported getting elevation data from other sources, others didn't. And at the time accurate and free ...


3

The Garmin Edge 510 can use bluetooth to pair with your smartphone. Then when you save a ride on the garmin, it'll automatically upload immediately.


3

I'm basing this on my 810 but I assume they're similar. You can create a new profile for riding on the turbo. For each profile you can select which sensors are used. If you turn off GPS and turn on cadence and speed (and HR if you have it) you can use it indoors. You might need another sensor to pick up wheel speed if you only have a cadence sensor. A ...


3

I find when climbing that horizontal speed is fairly meaningless but vertical speed can be quite helpful for keeping you going and/or interesting. When you know a climb is 1000m and your computer says whatever-kmh, you've no idea what that means without maths and knowing the gradient, 1000vmh means an hour to go, 500vmh, 2 hours... and so on.


3

You can get map files that work on Garmin devices (I haven't tried with Edge) from this site. You can select predefined areas (countries, provinces) of the world you want, or create custom selections of just your area. They generate a map of your desired area and send you an email when its ready so you can download it.


2

The map-capable Garmin cycling units come with a solid basemap with the ability to add additional maps, and the Touring unit has a micro SD slot to make this even easier. Granted the maps that come with are good for a point of reference, I wouldn't recommend Garmin's maps for any substantial route finding. If you're trying to find a safe bicycle route ...


2

I'm not sure how the Edge 1000 works, and whether or not it allows showing multiple tracks. Some other Garmin models can do this (ie Etrex), but they work differently in a number of ways. Yes, joining tracks in a GPX file is possible, there is a wide variety of software to do this. One option is Garmin BaseCamp, which is available as a free download for ...


2

Garmin Connect Edge 1000 has Wi-Fi which can auto-upload to Connect - and subsequently to Strava. But the simplest solution is to use your phone? - however this has the disadvantage of draining the battery on it. So probably best used for those shorter training rides.


2

Garmin 510 uses ANT+ to communicate to the add-on devices. I would remove and re-pair the devices first to see if they are actually seeing each other first. The speed and cadence sensor should pair as a single device and not speed and cadence separately.


2

I use the Garmin Oregon 450 as a cycling GPS and I am quite happy with it. I don't have the speed/cadence sensor, but I plan to get it soon. According to the documentation it supports ANT+ sensors like the heart rate meter and the cadence sensor. Apparently it doesn't work with the speed part of the speed/cadence sensor but the cadence part does work. The ...


2

The Oregon series only reads your speed and distance from the GPS which is not always as accurate as classic speed sensors - from my experience the difference can be up to 4-5% depending on the terrain. And you will probably have to buy a separate handlebar mount, because they are not provided in the box as far as I know. You can use Garmin Connect, so ...


2

From my research, the Garmin Edge 800 uses a 1Ah lithium ion battery. In general, these do not have a memory effect like older rechargeable batteries. But some care is still worthwhile, for example storing the battery completely charged (in a hot environment) or completely discharged is damaging. Partial discharge cycles are generally seen as good for ...


2

The Garmin Edge 205/305 Owner's Manual makes it clear that any data that was not saved using the Garmin Training Center Software would be overwritten when the device is full. The Garmin Training Center Software was last updated Aug 25, 2011. The Windows version ran on XP, but it can still be downloaded by following the links. You'd have to test if it will ...


2

I've had the same mixed results using the Edge 500 for courses. It sounds like you used a TCX file for the first course, giving you a better auto-zoom level and accuracy, and maybe a GPX file on the second course, resulting in less accurate performance. Sometimes though, it seems the little 500 just doesn't have the accuracy of other models and strays off ...


1

Try re-pairing the 510 with the speed/cadence sensor. It seems like it's not connected and the speed data is coming from the GPS rather than the sensor. As suggested by others, the alignment of the speed/cadence sensor is important, but it must be close since you seem to get a little cadence data before it drops out. Perhaps it's too close and your crank ...


1

I also have an Edge 510 (since ~3 months) with the same sensor, but I have not experienced this. I have recently updated to the latest firmware, which often solves similar issues with power readings. Since you were riding at quite low temperatures, the capacity of the battery does decrease, but since the speed reading is fine I would not suspect the battery ...


1

I have a Garmin 510 unit with a GSC-10 speed/cadence sensor. If you don't already have a seperate cadence sensor installed, a combined speed/cadence sensor like the GSC-10 from Garmin (or any other ANT+ sensor from other manufacturers) is the easiest. Just pair the sensor to your unit as per manual and you're good to go. However, you should realize that ...


1

If your GPS bike computer doesn't include a map[1] and you're navigating from a topo map, having the elevation can be very useful for making route decisions. In the bad old days before ubiquitous GPS, by far the most useful navigation tool in the mountains for me was a barometric elevation watch. That and a topo map was my go to tool 90% of the time. Of ...


1

I am planning to bike across Pennsylvania this summer and I am having trouble finding good roads to use for biking. Then I hit upon the idea of Google street view (and the Microsoft version of it). Using street view has been a fantastic help for me! I have found a route that has paved shoulders for my entire north/south route! And that was in a couple ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible