New answers tagged

0

Honestly i have 2 of what you describe with a few variations - for gearing you don't need more than 2X11. Light i would consider looking at a dynamo hub like SON 28. Rear rack look at Thule, bike pannier rack (use to be called Freeload). Suspension and dropper post these days come almost standard on most bikes and you don't need to go spend $7k plus to ...


3

Alternatives to adding a (possibly very low) rear derailleur: add a hub gear instead I'm not sure you can do this in-line with the rear axle (it would have to be joined to the hub shell), so it might need to precede the rear axle and drive a second chain. Actually, I see Sturmey Archer make specific tricycle hub gears, but I have no idea how they're ...


6

Normally I would say "you wouldn't start from there", but since you have... Since you've managed to add a cassette, I assume you're reasonably confident with tools. You're going to have to make a derailleur hanger that sits in the right place. If you can get a sealed bearing over the axle it'll be easier, but if not you will need to make a plain bearing ...


1

I found this image in an untrusted link, on a site called https://www.factorydirectbikes.com/. It seems to show a trike with gears. Perhaps either the people at that site, or Pashley themselves might help you. At the very least, you'll need to add a bracket to the centre frame member to hold the derailleur. See ...


1

It sounds as though your cable needs to be adjusted. On the rear dérailleur there will be a barrel adjuster where the cable enters the mech. You can increase the cable tension by rotating the barrel adjuster anti-clockwise and loosen it by (you guessed it!) rotating it clockwise. By getting the cable tension right you should be able to get more accurate ...


5

For a generator you will probably want two sets of gears. Cyclists normally pedal at about 90-110rpm, and getting a small generator to work efficiently normally means spinning at 1000's of rpm. I used a "drill pump" to make a pedal powered pump once and that was designed to spin at 1800rpm. But it used 500W or more at that speed, so I spun it at about ...


1

I find it much easier to think whether I want a lower or higher gear at each moment than to try to think which specific gear do I want. If pedaling is too hard, shift to a lower gear. If pedaling is too easy/fast, shift to a higher gear. As the others have said, you get a lower gear with large gears on the back (the right shifter) and small gears on the ...


3

I recommend that you start with #2 on the front and use only the rear cassette to change gearing until you understand gearing more naturally. So... Use the shifter on the left bar until the chain is in the #2 (middle) gear on the front. From then on, use the right shifter. If it's too hard to pedal, shift one click. If it's harder, then shift the other ...


5

Pedalling efficiency/difficulty is related to the ratio between your front and rear gears. Front : The big crown is the hardest one The small crown is the easiest one For rear gears this is the opposite. In general, you should avoid crossing the chain, which is: Putting the small front and rear gears at the same time Putting the big front and rear ...


2

In addition to improperly tuned derailleurs, drivetrain slippage may also be caused by a worn chain or cassette. Worn Chain: One way to check whether the chain is worn is to use a chain wear indicator. They're cheap and easy to carry with you, but if you'd rather not buy one and if the rental place has a repair shop, you could ask to either borrow theirs ...


2

In short, no. There are two main problems: Your bike does not have disc brake tabs. Your bike does not have a derailleur hanger. To be fair, it could be done, it would just be so expensive that you'd be better off buying a completely new bike with gears and disc brakes. If you chose to pursue this project, you would need: a new fork with disc brake ...



Top 50 recent answers are included