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1

When riding in wet/dirty terrain it's important to make sure your chain is well oiled and operating smoothly. If the chain isn't clean and lubricated it will feel like it "slips". If it feels stiff in a couple places after cleaning, lubrication, and a ride around the block, it might be time to replace it. A thorough cleaning and good lubrication only works ...


1

When your bike was overhauled they likely replaced the shifter cables. The cables will stretch over time. The result is the derailleurs don't shift as accurately as they should. It is a fairly simple process to readjust them. There are many on line tutorials that will show you how to do this yourself. If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself your ...


0

Man handling the rear derailleur I discovered the jockey wheels were indeed in the wrong position as a result of the rear mechs pivot point having seized up. I can push it into the correct position and the chain engages the jockey wheel and runs normally but the mech isn't moving freely by itself. This means it isn't extending fully to run in the big ring ...


-1

As previously stated, a picture or two would help answer this question accurately. Even without a picture, some information is missing. What kind of cassette is it, and how many front chain rings do you have? Because if you have 3 cogs on the front, (depending how many gears you have on your cassette, for this answer I'll assume you have at least 9), then ...


0

It would help if you could post a photograph, but what I'm picturing from your description is that when you shift onto any of the three largest cogs in the back while you're on the large chainring the derailleur cage is pulled almost horizontal and the jockey wheel disengaged from the chain. To me, this sounds like your chain is too short. Since chains ...


1

If you want to run drop bars and don't care if you actually have brifters or not, I've had a really good experience using Gevenalle Shifting system. It mounts bar end shifters on the front of brake levers and offers configurations for Shimano compatible 9/10/11 speed setups and use a friction shifter for the front (you wouldn't need a new front derailleur). ...


1

No you cannot. The Hero Cyclone does not appear to have a hanger / mounting holes for a dérailleur. You may be able to install an internal gear hub, but it would likely cost far more than the bike. You may be able to find something used though.


1

I don't see any problem with doing this on your bike if you use Shimano drifters. Generically there are two areas you'll need to consider: The actuation ratio of the shifters, and The brake pull. Shimano 9-speed road and mountain derailers use the same actuation ratio. You should be OK here. You don't mention which Surly touring frame you have so I ...


4

Microshift is a brand. They are Taiwan base. Most of the twist shifter operates in similar manner as you described. They are for trimming as Batman said. But in fact it is made from the same machine and parts to keep the cost down. It is all about how to set up the front derailleur in your system, and find a spot for each appropriate gearing. i.e. avoid ...


1

After watching both videos, I believe that whatever bent the rear derailer also bent the derailer hanger, which has your rear derailer out of alignment. The rear derailer/derailleur is that complicated part you replaced that moves the chain between gears on the rear, and also keeps the chain from getting loose and falling off. On most bikes, the rear ...


0

I didn't see the video but if your talking about the last 2 lower gears you may need to loose the tension cable. if its the top 2 big gears then you may need to tighten. make sure you derailleur is installed correctly. make sure the last pulley lines up at all cogs especially the biggest one, using your hand and pushing this up and down the cassette, make ...


0

The number of cogs per cassette will depend on hub compatibility. If you have 8 cogs (8 speed) you also have to make sure what ratio you want, the smallest being 11 up to 32 (largest cog closest to the wheel spoke) there's many ratios you can choose from depending on ride style. If you go anywhere larger than 28, you may need a midsize derailleur ... all ...


-1

I had the exact same problem and it was due to broken teeth on one of the chain rings. Inspect your chain rings and look for worn or frankly broken cogs. Replace the chain ring.


2

Follow the cable from the shifter down to the front derailleur. At the derailleur the cable housing will end and the inner cable will continue to a screw on the derailleur that clamps the cable, take a moment to look at derailleur and find the lever that the screw is on and push it. That should move the cage of the derailleur (the part that shifts the ...


0

The general answer is, "yes, you can change chainrings" – chainring is bicycle talk for the front sprocket. The more specific answer will depend on the actual crankset the bike is built with. There are some that don't make it easy to remove a chainring or where replacement rings are hard to find. To know for sure you'd want to have the bike in hand and check ...


0

This is a fairly standard looking crank, chainrings should be readily available in a variety of sizes. When I searched on the specs the pictures and listings didn't match, so you'll have to measure to be sure what you have in front of you. However, you might want to actually try riding the bike as it is, turning your legs at a fairly standard 90 rpm is ...


1

You'll have to wait until you get the bike & measure the distance between the holes, using this method. Then you can order the appropriate size chainring. Such as those here. Rather than trying to lengthen the chain, I would recommend you buy a new one as you will be much less likely to have a tight or bent link this way. You should not need to make ...



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