Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Crack open the shifter. There's four screws hokding it together. Be careful to not displace the springs. If you do move the main one, it is meant to be attached over the cable router and within a small hole in the white plastic near the centre. As for correcting you precieved problem. In general there is a white strip with sprockets. Move the white strip ...


0

I have had precisely this happen luckily I had an aftermarket alu derailleur bolt fitted which snapped saving damage to my frame but the mech, chain and the wheel were right offs ! It's an expensive lesson to learn so don't do it ! To add to my answer I wasn't shifting under load just the opposite in fact it was definitely a simultaneous shift down at the ...


0

I use Mixa (facial cream) for winter sports (not just biking in winter). It's great every way -- for general protection of the skin in cold temperatures, as well as reducing the occasional red effect. I wear a thin cap under the helmet also, clear glasses shaped to the face, and a generous neckscarf. That way, exposure to the elements is minimal. (I'd go ...


0

You can't really wear anything to solve the problem you are describing. If your face was cold, I'd recommend you purchase some sort of mask, however, that isn't your stated problem. When you exercise you generate heat, your body tries to channel that away by dilating blood vessels and sending that heat to the surface (your cheeks) where it can radiate ...


0

I had something similar happen, after hours of calibrating, I realized I was using a 7 speed shifter on a 5 speed cassette. This might not at all be the case for you, but if it is, it would be worth checking.


1

Your only economically viable option is to get a new 6-speed rear cluster that has a wider range. Adding gears onto the front that bike is going to be almost expensive enough that it's probably not really worth doing. And adding more gears to the rear is effectively impossible. That's an overstatement, but it's waaay more money and work than you want to get ...


0

To upgrade the rear: you will get a wider wheel, therefor you are going to wider your rear fork too. I don't know if you have 8 cogs freewheels in your LBS, so it can be, that to put 8 gears, you will have to replace the wheel to get a free hub & cassette system. For 7 gears you will not have to replace chain, while for 8 you will have to. Anyway, those ...


0

There is no best. It is purely preference. Most high-end bicycles are equipped with the rapid fire levers - but this may be purely down to market consensus ie. what sells a bike. Some XC racers still use the gripshift shifters and SRAM still make the high-end shifters. I used gripshift years ago on my first mountain bikes but found them quite fragile in a ...


1

Provided that the chain length is adjusted correctly, with a 2-chainring crankset you can freely use the entire range of gears. The "dangerous" gears are the ones causing cross-chaining. These are: small sprocket at front + small sprocket at the back, and big sprocket at front and big sprocket at the back. Especially the latter can cause trouble when your ...


6

The general rule is that you don't want the chain angle to be extreme (i.e. the chain should be running as parallel to the frame as possible) - when the chain is at an extreme angle, it is called cross chaining. This is a good read. For example, you don't want to use the little ring in the front and the little cog in the back (this increases wear on both ...


3

A rear wheel with an internal 3 speed hub (you can get more gears if you like) should solve the problem you are having. The gearing system is kept enclosed and away from salt and dirt. It's a little expensive as you basically have to buy a new rear wheel, or relace your old one, but this is the best way to fix it. That or go completely single speed.


3

I took part in a charity ride from Scotland to Italy in June last year, and that was made a lot easier with the use of a support team to help carry everything. Since you are going it alone, you need to consider quite a lot of things: Directions It's fine planning a route, but they often don't go to plan. Always be prepared to make alterations at the last ...


0

Parts need a break in time to stretch, flex, and do what they do before they kind of settle in. When I worked at a bikeshop, we told our customers to come in after a month or 2 so that we could go through and get everything tuned up to where it should be after the break in period. Not only is your situation normal, most bike shops WANT you to bring it back ...


3

As you're not clear on road vs mtb, there's two answers. For 11 spd road drivetrains Shimano uses a 1.85mm wider hub with the drive side flange closer to the centerline to compensate for the additional width. Using a spacer allows the wheel to be backwards compatible to fit a 10 spd cassette. You can't fit a 11spd freehub in place of a 10spd freehub unless ...


4

Shimano/SRAM 11 speed cassettes are wider than 8/9/10 speed ones. So yes, you need a new, wider freehub body, unless your old one was not very old and used a spacer to fit a 10-speed cassette. People with non-Shimano brand hubs are less likely to find replacement freehub bodies, it seems, leading to replacement of the whole hub, or even the whole wheel if ...


6

I basically agree with @RoboKaren's answer, but wanted to add a couple of things that would take up too much space for a comment. For starters, you say that the chain mashed up the derailleur. So the derailleur was actually the "victim" of the problem, not necessarily the cause. So while you might need to replace the derailleur, that is likely not the only ...


6

If your bicycle is a BSO (bicycle shaped object sold at discount mass retailers), then likely no. You'd spend $100+ labor on the derailleur and a new chain, but then the next week the brakes would fail, the handlebar would come off, or the frame would crack. BSOs are money pits. Furthermore, it's unlikely you could just replace the derailleur, you'd have to ...


1

Like you say - the 8 speed shifter will work perfectly well with a 7 speed cassette. You just lose the use of 1-click too many. Poor shifting in the downward direction is usually a sign of poor cabling. Either old cables or poor routing. But you mention poor shifting in both directions - which looks suspiciously like a problem with the shifter itself. Mark ...



Top 50 recent answers are included