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1

Changing to an 11 cog on the rear will certainly give you a higher gear. I found 9 speed Shimanos in 11/21 and 11/23 easily. I didn't find any road cassettes that had a lower low gear. I also found mountain bike versions with much larger low gears, but you probably need a new derailleur for them.


3

An 11 speed rear cassette gives you more linear gaps between gears. It doesn't necessarily give you higher or lower gears. There are bigger chainrings than 53 tooth, but they're rare, expensive, and tend to be single-speed track bikes. There are smaller cassettes than 12 tooth, 11 is the lowest you can get normally, and some folding bikes can go down to 9 ...


4

Your technology is up to date. 53x12 is basically still the standard for road bikes today. If you want to increase the gearing, your best bet would be to install an 11x cassette, if not a Sram 10x. That said... If you are regularly finding your 53x12 too low it means one of three things: You are mashing (standing up in a heavy gear) instead of spinning (...


1

If your cassette is 10 speed, you need a 10 speed chain. The derailleur will be fine.


0

On my bike I need to be on 1 of the smaller front cogs for lower gears to work correctly. If I'm on the large sprocket lower gears are unreliable due to bend in chain. My owners manuel said not to use extreme combos eg large front to largre rear


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In the diagram below (from Park Tool) one can notice that if the innermost (lowest) cog grows much larger it will interfere with the top pulley on the rear derailleur. This is the primary limiting factor for the size of cogs. For chainwheels, I suspect that the ground would be the physical limit. Of course you'd better eat a good breakfast and have a ...


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You need Med to long dérailleur for 32t+34t Cogs. Not sure but, yours should be long, due to age. You can't add a gear. Road bikes usually do not have a 32t cog. Change out your large cog for a 32t cog. You may need a longer chain too. Here is a link on freewheels customizing etc...http://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html


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Just to add one more perspective: I've done this on a racing route full of hills. I swapped out my medium cage 105 for a mountain bike derailleur (Deore 9 speed). I was teased a bit, but after 85 miles I was asked a lot of questions as to how I did this and why it worked. Large cog was 34, and I had no problems shifting. So consider dishing out for a ...


3

It is a freewheel. You will need the appropriate freewheel tool. The tool typically won't fit without removing the axle. You may also need the correct cone wrenches. This makes it a good time to service the wheels bearings as well. You may want to consult your LBS and compare the cost of having it done versus purchasing the tools you may only use once.


1

Nice shopping list. You'll need a new chain too - theres no saving putting your existing used chain onto brand new everything else. Personally I'd go for the long cage because it allows more difference between smallest and largest cog in the cassette. As an all-purpose rider I want a 12~28 or 12-30 cassette with a triple on the front. However as a tri ...


2

In terms of the rear derailleur, you will need to determine the capacity you need. To do that, add together the teeth in largest rear cluster and largest chainwheel to get the max teeth you have. Then add together the small rear cog and the smallest chainwheel to get the min teeth you have. Subtract the min from the max. That is your capacity needed. ...


2

Have you and the shop both checked the frame very carefully for damage? It sounds as though you're probably too heavy or too strong for the frame you ride. Bikes are built light, and have a designed weight limit. But that limit is generally based on an average rider, so the stronger you are and the more you slog rather than spin, the more you have to allow ...


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I thought I would post an answer to my own question as I finally heard back from Madsen. (They were very nice--especially since i bought the bike used). I figure that if anyone else is looking for the information, it will be handy to have it here. They confirmed that a front derailleur can easily be added, and that if I want a triple up front I would ...



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