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0

I HIGHLY doubt this, but it could be possible that you are running a compact chainring set-up on cranks originally set up for triple chain-rings. I derped around with this before, and noticed that the chain would slip from the big-ring into a void between the two chain-rings and make you spin endlessly, creating a horrifically loud and embarrassing grinding ...


0

I also like to cycle in the higher gears, the slower cadence. I have always been told that it is not good for your knees and when I have trouble with sore legs I do switch to lower gears and find that I have less pain. But I do have an upper limit in how fast I can turn my legs, it is going up over the years but I still like the higher gears and the slower ...


2

Converting your single speed bike to geared one is probably not worth the effort, for several reasons: Cassettes and hub gears both need different kind of wheel hubs than single speeds. You will need to change the whole wheel. Single speed bicycles usually have narrower rear fork spacing (distance between rear fork dropouts) than geared ones. Your rear ...


3

In addition to the other great answers, slow cadence encourages, for some riders, standing cycling, particularly when going up hills. This places a great deal of stress on the drivetrain, and in particular the bottom bracket. Whether you stand or sit, though, a slower cadence is simply trading speed for force - the effort is the same, but the stress on the ...


8

This subject is about the performance on a bicycle Cycling is aerobic exercise in nature. 1) Fast twitch vs. Slow twitch muscle In high gear (low cadence and higher force per pedal stroke for the same output, in comparison to higher cadence) you recruit more of your fast-twitch muscle, and thus you are doing more anaerobic (not aerobic) exercise. It's OK ...


6

The power you transfer to the bike is proportional to the force on the pedals multiplied by the cadence. There's some upper limit to how much force you can apply, but you can spin more quickly. Sometimes if I'm overtaken by another bike (travelling faster than I am) I've found that I can keep up with that bike, if I change down into a lower gear and then ...


18

Left to their own devices many will cycle at a cadence (a measure of how fast you spin) that approximates cadence of walking, an RPM of about 50-60. So the fact you prefer a slower leg speed is not unusual. Trained cyclists will often have a cadence between 80-110 and up to 200 for sprints (track). Is there something bad about a cycling style in ...


3

The crash made the chain drop from the currently selected front chainring to a smaller one (i.e if you have 3 rings and you where on the middle, it jumped on the 1st - lefmost- smaller one). The crash didn't change any gear on the shifter though, it just made the chain pop to a smaller ring. Maybe not fully, but partially. Afterwards cranking a couple of ...


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34/50 is a standard combination, so 34/48 should work without problems. Friction shifters just make it easier to overshift and trim on the fly.


2

If you're friction shifting go with the Dia Compe. They have a ratcheting mechanism in them originally developed by SunTour to counteract the spring in the derailleur. This gives them a very even feel in both directions - you apply as much pressure to upshift as to downshift. They also look better on older bikes. The Shimano shifters OTOH rely purely on ...


0

Single ring up front can be a very good option but it really depends on the course. Do keep in mind that this is cyclocross RACING. I've seen (and passed!) many riders who seem hell bent on riding every inch of the course. That's not how things work in cross. Sometimes you're much faster getting off the bike and running. That said, keeping two rings up front ...


0

It sounds like your derailer(s), or derailleurs if you prefer, are out of adjustment. Derailers work by guiding the chain from side-to-side to shift gears. They have limit screws that are supposed to stop the movement before the chain comes off, but if the limit screws are misadjusted it will be possible to shift beyond the limits of the chainrings in the ...



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