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15

There are many factors that influence choices. - terrain you ride, sunlight intensity, shade effects etc, and personal preference. A quick internet search will give you technical answers on what colors do look here . For me personally, I mostly Mountain Bike, I live in New Zealand, which has extremely high UV light levels. Therefore I do not venture out ...


10

If you don't want to spend lots of money you can still get the most relevant characteristics in a pair of safety glasses. You can find these at just about any hardware store and they: wrap around, are impact resistant, block UV, don't look half bad come in clear and tinted (and are cheap enough to get one of each usually)


9

A frame that doesn't obscure your vision at all. Especially if you're cycling on the road, you want to be able to do a shoulder check without the frame blinkering you at all. Also, glasses that fit quite close to your face are good because they reduce the chance that a bit of mud or an insect is going to get around them and into your eye.


9

Yes, in most cases normal prescription glasses sit too low on the nose for the purpose of shielding the eyes in road bike position. And as the speed increases, the need for effective eye protection grows, too. Consider either: Getting contact lenses, and then you can wear bike specific glasses Getting bike glasses with prescription lens inserts. In my ...


8

Coatings are fairly useless on their own. Condensation happens because warm wet air is hitting a surface below a certain temperature (condensation point). Coatings tend to just encourage beading and run off. I'd look for a pair of double-lens ski goggles. It's as it sounds and works in a similar way to double glazing. Two sets of "glass" separated by some ...


8

Transition lenses! After riding for years with various sunnies and cycling glasses with interchangeable lenses I got sick of having to carry around multiple lenses and changing them during the ride. Recently, I got a pair of Oakley Fives with transition lenses. They are brilliant. No more need for changing lenses, they are always the right level of shading ...


8

How do downhill riders cope with this? With a front fender or with a mud guard such as this. With goggles which use disposable tear off lenses or the ones with a reel of fresh len material which is pulled via a string or via bluetooth or something. Does the full-face helmet protect the mask in some way? Probably not. Do they apply anti-water ...


7

Cycling glasses are a very functional piece of equipment. While any glasses will be better than none, you ideally want glasses that: Wrap your face, so the frame does not obstruct your field of vision Have lenses that are close to your eyes, without large gaps between them and your face (to minimize dust and debris from getting to your eyes) Allow a ...


6

I suffered from foggy glasses a lot, I prefer to wear clear lenses since I tend to ride after dark frequently. I tried a few of different cycling glasses with clear lenses, eyeglasses with anti-fog coating, motorcycle goggles, and several pairs of safety glasses with no luck. I finally found a pair of $9 MSA Safety Works safety goggles with anti fog coating ...


6

Look for downhill MTB goggles. These will be made to fit with a standard bike helmet and will have sticky plastic on the straps so that they will stay in place on your helmet. I rode with a pair last winter and was very happy with them. Kept my eyes warm and didn't fog even under heavy riding. Many also come standard with clear lens so visibility won't ...


5

The Hindsight glasses include fresnel lenses that widen the peripheral field, at the cost of increased distortion. As stated in the article, this is a design concept, so there's no guarantee it will ever make it to market. And although it's a neat idea, it would take a lot of testing to determine whether the tradeoffs are worth it for enough people. This ...


5

The best lenses to get peripheral vision are going to be contact lenses; which I can highly recommend for cycling. I wear continuous-wear ones, where you put them in at the beginning of the month and take them out at the end. However when you're not used to contacts (or they're quite cheap) you run the risk of losing them to various factors (e.g. wind, ...


4

I always go for interchangeable lenses. I use the clear ones (or yellow if you must), at night, and dark ones in really bright sun. Although mostly I just keep the clear ones in day and night. On every pair I've had the clear lens also gives full UV protection (although clear won't cut down glare of course). Make sure you try them on so that they are a good ...


4

I think it depends largely on conditions. I like to wear Bollé glasses and treated myself to a pair last summer. They do lots of variations so before purchasing the glasses I did a bit of research. They published a really useful paper outlining the appropriateness of different colour lenses under different light conditions, Very useful. A couple of other ...


4

Ordinary prescription glasses are sufficient but suboptimal. Although I agree that the best answer is to get bike glasses with prescription lenses or contact lenses, waiting to get optimal eyewear is no reason to avoid using a road bike. I wear prescription glasses and have not yet budgeted for cycling glasses, but I have not had any major problems. Cycling ...


3

Eyeglasses, particularly those with relatively "low profile" lenses, will cause problems in an extreme aero crouch position. So it depends on the specifics of your glasses, the bike, and your usual riding position. I'm extremely nearsighted and wear glasses that are about midway on the round/low-profile axis. I ride a touring bike (ie, a road frame) with ...


3

I hate to give yet another It Depends answer, but it does. In my experience, the shape of your face will determine the cycling goggles that work best for you. I've got a long nose and narrow face, and I wanted sunglasses that didn't admit any sun over the top edge. I wound up with a pair of Nikes (now discontinued, like every good thing Nike ever does), but ...


3

I recommend another expensive pair of sunglasses from Oakley: The Jawbone. Excellent crystal clear peripheral vision. You can get lenses with little vents. Lens change-out is easy. Lots of colors to choose from. They stay on your face and are very durable. Many pros wear them. The only bad thing is the price at about US $200. About lenses... It is good ...


3

Ski goggles are a good option, but the main problem with ski goggles is that they block your peripheral vision, even if you have clear lenses. You should augment them with a helmet mounted mirror. These work well with balaclavas (which are nice in the winter, depending on where you live). Regular old clear safety glasses like you use in high school ...


3

I'll answer you comment on contacts, as I think you should investigate it. I had the same dilemma a year ago. After wearing glasses for a couple of years for close up stuff, I was getting to the point I needed glasses while out on the trail. I looked around at options and decided to go down the contacts path. I now wear contacts in weekends and while ...


2

I love my Oakley Fives. Pros: The frames are relatively cheap They're very light and comfortable to ride in They provide good coverage and keep out dust/grime and breeze The arms are designed to detach when under pressure rather than break I think they look good I have transition lenses and they are fantastic. I never have to worry about changing ...


2

I've never heard of this being a problem for anyone... but I admittedly stick to the more upright-seated end of the bicycle continuum. I suggest you try before you buy, of course, but you may also wish to look for a bike with a longer stem, so that if you find you have this trouble, you can raise your handlebars. Cyclocross bikes should actually be a bit ...


2

Clear glasses with no tint and a good 100% UV and Fog resistant coating that do not block peripheral vision are useful in the almost any conditions They may not be optimal for all, they have the fewest benefits but few faults. They are generally safe and useful in Dawn, Day, Dusk, and Night conditions. Lenses with any Tint may be dangerous at night or at ...


1

The answer is "they are probably safe" and "they don't work for spit". Skiers have exactly this same problem with ski goggles and what I have learned in 50 years of skiing is that if the goggle has an built in anti-fog coating, cleaning it with anything but a mild soap will ruin what minimal anti fog coating it has. Sunglasses generally don't have much in ...


1

I have five sets of lenses for my glasses, and tend to use the dark amber photochromatic lenses the most (dubbed "Red Fototec" by Tifosi). They filter the most visible light, and are decent if the sky becomes overcast. I use yellow lenses on heavy overcast days, and clear lenses on night rides. I rarely use "smoked" (grey) lenses, except maybe for ...


1

It depends. There are reasons that many sunglasses come with multiple lenses. I use darker color when riding in bright sunlight, less dark when it is cloudy and clear when it is dark and/or raining. But then again, I have seen pretty much all colors out there. The biggest reason that we wear sunglasses isn't for shade but to protect our eyes from crap ...


1

When wearing a balaclava I've found that I really have to concentrate on breathing through the fabric as opposed to letting my breath travel up and out around the eye opening, especially when stopped. If you're still having significant issues with fogging without the balaclava it may be that the glasses actually fit too snugly to your face and perspiration ...



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