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GPS may be accurate +/- 15 meteres. http://gpsinformation.net/main/altitude.htm If you have a GPS device with barometric measurement - then this can improve. Should you be worried? If you're using it for cycling then probably not - it is only an indicative figure of metres gained or lost. If you're trying to land a plane - then yes. :)


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As mattnz alluded to it can be notoriously difficult to estimate calories burned, even with a heart rate monitor. As a bit of history, for the longest time it was generally believed that Polar heart rate monitors were the most accurate, because Polar essentially purchased the rights to the best proprietary algorithm available (going by memory, I will need to ...


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Some apps will use the GPS altitude information - and the errors on that can be quite large at ground level with clutter (basically all the satellites you can see are above you which doesn't help). Here's an example: Until a few days ago I was using cardiotrainer and the last 3 times I ran the same 10km loop I got 59m, 22m and 0m total climb. I'm confident ...


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RANT - Do not read if you do not want to be offended. A lot of calorie burn questions popping up at the moment. The problem is biometrics has become the latest fashion accessory, and everyone (manufacturers and users) are clambering on the band wagon without stopping to think what they want this data for. Manufacturers want to sell gadgets and make money, ...


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Garmin has offered several different algorithms over the years to estimate energy expenditure and some are better than others. However, the only way to get really reliable calorie burn data from a bike computer is with a direct-force power meter, and -- in my experience, at least -- most simple algorithms to estimate calorie burn will overestimate the ...


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In my opinion it is only a usable value data point to compare against the same previous data point. An unfit person will burn more calories at a given level of exercise (based on heart rate and other factors) than a fit person. An unfit person will have a less efficient heart and circulatory system. A calorie usage point can't be made without calculating the ...


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I have a Garmin 800 which includes heart rate in addition to speed and elevation. Heart rate tells it what my actual level of effort is, so that should take wind and all those other variables into account. It also knows my age, gender and weight, so with all that data it should be able to estimate calories burned pretty closely, or at least as closely as is ...


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By order of magnitude if you mean by a factor of 10 then most likely yes. You have wind, rolling, and gradient resistance. It is going to be spot on for gradient resistance so if you have a hilly ride it will be more accurate. Clearly it does not account for wind. I expect it assumes a mid level road bike on decent pavement. At speeds over 10 ...



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