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10

Google 'cyclocross'. The primary difference between a road bike and a CX bike is the size of the tires. You can ride your road bike anywhere your skills will allow. There are some gotcha's though. Skinny tires only have so much traction. Gravel flats won't be an issue for all but the lightest of race tires, but pinch flats from hitting larger rocks at ...


9

As other answers and comments have indicated, you can successfully ride a road bike on loose gravel. There are five main factors, and they are all interconnected: The depth of the gravel. The key to riding in gravel is smooth lines. Avoid sharp turns: the deeper the gravel, the more your front wheel digs in and accentuates any steering movement you make. ...


4

To me, gravel bikes seem mostly like cross bikes with a bit more money they can take from your wallet. 1) Road and mountain shifters and derailleurs don't play nice with each other at 11 speed, so this question is moot. If you want to check a particular crankset on the bike, look at the width and the type of BB setup. I don't see why you'd want to switch ...


4

There is no tool that I know of that solves your problem for you. The way I solve the problem of finding out what a road is like, is to use Google maps to find a route. then use Street View to check the roads at important points. Of course, if the road is gravel, Street View is probably not available. if the route is not what I want, drag the route ...


4

I have a 2011 Jamis Xenith Endura 2. It is a carbon frame with rack mounts embedded in the frame. I have been commuting with this bike for 5 years, maybe twice a week, most of the year. I also run errands and take recreational with it. I use Ortleib Panniers and often have them loaded up. So far no problems.


3

There is a tool I know of that solves your problem: OsmAnd (available for free on F-Droid, paid versions on Android Play Store + iOS App Store). If the region has decent coverage with properly mapped highway types, the app's offline routing offers a bicycle mode + the option to avoid unpaved roads. Whether the data coverage is good enough in the region can ...


3

Good quality road maps will differentiate between paved and unpaved roads. I really like my Gazetteer State Maps


3

They should be fine. There are a lot of people that ride "road" wheels for cyclocross. Unless you have some dedicated tubular wheels with wider and shallower glue beds to accommodate cross tires, you're probably riding "road" wheels with cross tires on them anyway. I'm currently using some Mavic ksyriums on my cross bike as training wheels and they work ...


3

Depending on your local regulations, claiming the lane might be illegal (it is here where I live, for example). So, my advice would it be to ride on the right side of the road (assuming that right is the driving side), but not getting too close to the curb because of the debris, gravel, car doors etc. When you see (and hear) someone behind you wanting to ...


3

You are asking two questions, one about the bike and one about the tires. Road bikes can easily go on gravel, or even off road. However, the ride quality and handling will be compromised the more "off road" you go. As far as the tires, the more you have "road" tires, the more flats you will have. This is due to the thin nature of road tires for less rolling ...


2

Any bike can go anywhere. I've taken a road bike down an off-road course, and an electric assist road bike up a steep gravel path (not fun) My weekend ride these days is a non-suspension steel mountain bike with knobbly tyres but a smooth strip on the face of the tread for road comfort. As long as the parts work together and fit your body and style of ...


2

Between mass and aerodynamics you would be expending a ton more energy on the MTB if the roads are in decent shape. Rather than roadify the MTB you might consider MTBifying a road bike. Tires are the key, really large, supple ones to soak up the bumps, at an appropriate pressure. Perhaps aiming for tubular cx tires that you can run really low pressures on.


1

I found at least one carbon bike with rear rack eyelets, the Jamis Xenith Endura Elite Di2 Bike but those don't look very strong to me - the eyelet seems to be a separate part moulded into the carbon frame, rather than being part of the dropout. They also use electronic shifting, so you'd need to be able to charge the battery while travelling if you were ...


1

"Road Bike" is a pretty broad term, but let's assume we're talking about a bike designed for long-distance road riding and not criterium or even road racing—a category used to be called "sport touring," but is now referred to as "endurance racing." Current examples include bikes like the Trek Domane, Giant Defy and Specialized Roubaix. Also, it depends ...


1

I found this map of Pennsylvania with dirt roads overlaid a while back. Not aware of similar projects but I imagine/hope they are out there.



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