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16

Two solutions I've used: Spray the inside of the grip with hair spray. Slide it on immediately, and then when the hair spray dries, it will glue the grip in place. Use rubbing alcohol. It does not do as good of a job at locking the grip in place, but it does evaporate quickly and doesn't leave any lubricant inside the grip.


9

Best solution (probably available only at shops): use an air compressor with a narrow tip to inject air between the grip and the handlebar at an angle (like spiralling around). This will create an air cushion and you can move the grip around (keep moving the air jet as you apply the air jet, since only in some positions the air cushion is formed). Less ...


9

Spit. Im not kidding. Saliva is a great lubricant that will dry with little residue, and depending on any sugars in your system, could be a little tacky. I have done this for years.


8

Hand numbness or tingling can happen for a variety of reasons. It could be a matter of fit, or simply tape or the handlebars themselves. Bike fit: How's your riding posture? If you're putting too much weight on your hands, it could be because you need to raise you saddle to allow you to put some of your weight on your legs. It's also possible you just ...


8

Wipe the bar with isopropyl alcohol. It evaporates completely and will leave dry rubber against a clean bar. If they slip and slide after more than about 24 hours left alone, the you may need to replace the grips (assuming they're not new). The high alcohol content is what makes hairspray effective, and using isopropyl alcohol cuts out the sticky residue ...


8

It seems a bit unusual to me that your grip would be actually 'glued' to your handlebar. Typically grips hold themselves in place, but I'll take your word for it. =] If your grip is in fact 'glued' in place, the adhesive is likely mediocre quality, and rotation you're experiencing is due to heat from your hand and/or the outdoors slightly softening the glue....


6

Distribute thin zip-ties around the inside of the grip somewhat evenly so that they provide slippery "rails" on which the grip can slide on the bar. Once the grip is in place, pull the zip-ties out (with pliers if necessary).


6

It is a little hard to tell from your photos, but do you have grip shifters? For setups with grip shifters, the grips are generally much shorter / narrower, as part of the "grip surface" is the shifter itself. If you do indeed have grip shifters, you can do as ojs suggested & move the shifters / brakes in towards the stem, or, you could return the ...


5

Which grips you get for a mountain bike is mostly a matter of comfort and personal taste. In terms of how they attach to the bike, there are grips that glue on and grips that screw on. They're exactly what they sound like. Locking grips (that tighten onto the bars with an allen key or a screwdriver) will avoid the grips twisting over time. You can also ...


5

There certainly are tapes and gloves that help decrease road shock transmitted to the hands. The traditional cinelli cork tape is a bit too hard if you're sensitive to that. Bontrager makes a nice gel tape. I use it, but honestly I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference. IMHO, the core issue might not be one of sufficient padding at all. It could ...


4

I have had the same problem is the past with Oury grips. My solution was to use a bit of rubber cement. You only need to apply a little to the bar and inside of the grip. While the cement is still wet, it will slide on smoothly, then dry and secure nicely. Be sure to wipe off any excess that accumulates as you slide the grip on. I have had no trouble ...


4

Grips will not wrap the brake levers. You have several options: Find a compatible brake lever which has plastic levers Wrap the brake levers in something (a few layers of heat shrink tubing, plasti-dip, a bit of plastic/vinyl tubing like you get for refrigerator water hoses, brake lever covers (they exist for motorcycles, so I suspect you can find them ...


4

You can move the brake and shift levers inward. They are tightened around the handlebar with hex bolts or screws, you can loosen these and move the parts around. If the result feels too narrow, you can change to a wider handlebar. Edit: See the other answer for solution with grip shifters.


3

I always used hairspray with my grips, it's the best solution in my opinion. It not only keeps them from slipping too far on/off the handlebars, but keeps them from twisting in place. Now, however, I use locking grips like these: http://www.ebay.com/itm/110736653646?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_1030wt_1163


3

A razor blade/knife/x-acto knife should cut it. Hockey shops have special knifes for cutting through hockey tape if you want a specialized device. This shouldn't be a problem for non-carbon bars though, if you're careful. The residue can be removed with rubbing alcohol or soapy water or mineral spirits (again, for carbon, I'm not sure what you'd do).


3

Avenir 3D rubber grips on my cruiser bar: Vodka :) Just a splash inside the grips, wriggle them on, and let excess drain outside the end hole.


3

Generally, the problem is due to riding/hand position and the resulting pressure on the hands. You don't say what kind of bar you have, but a traditional "drop" bar is better than a straight bar (absent extensions) for giving you different positions, and within each bar category there are many variations (though finding different bars can be a challenge at ...


3

If you have access to a compressor, compressed air works well – use the hole in the end of the grip to blow in air while covering the other end of the bars with your hand (or something). The air escaping around the grip opens it up enough that it is easy to slide on. Rubbing alcohol can be used as a lubricant. It will evaporate leaving the grips snug on the ...


2

Grips come in different materials. I've tried some rubber grips that have a tread pattern. They're quite grippy for when you need to hold on over rough ground. I found though they could be quite abrasive on my hands and that they could actually cause my skin to split. I've switched to some dense foam (ritchy ergo grips) and they still feel grippy enough, ...


2

If you put a flat blade screw driver into the bar whole with the blade between the clip and the grip and gently pry it away from the grip by leveraging on the opposite side of the clip, it should pop off. Or just pull hard with your hand.


2

Choosing a grip is a matter of personal preference. If you're worried about the fact that the Nexus shifters require a smaller grip on one side than the other (due to the shifter taking up room), you can get grips that are made to mate with an internal hub shifter like the Nexus. Alternately, since these can be difficult to locate, you can cut down the ...


2

The Lizard Skins Lock-on Logo grip is 31.06mm in diameter. The Lizard Skins Lock-on North Shore grip is 30.94mm in diameter. Both were measured using a digital caliper, and assuming a small difference in diameter due to texture, they are nominally 31mm diameter grips. The thinner Lizard skins grips measure approximately 29-30mm, again depending on ...


2

I use Oury Mountain Grips on my mountain bike and my city bike. They have a cheaper slide on version (about $10-12 USD) and a lock on version ($ about $30 USD) which I prefer. The lock on version avoids the 'slippy grip' issues you sometimes have when water eeks under the edge of the grip and it slips on the bars. These grips are smooth and cushy enough ...


1

You need to check with the manufacturer of your bars (and the grips you're choosing), but in most cases its not a problem. As with all things carbon fiber, don't over tighten anything. Some manufacturers have specific grips which are marketed as carbon fiber friendly. For example, Easton's lock on grips are marketed as being friendly with carbon bars. ...


1

Grips: Deeply grooved grips will not really compromise your commuting ability, but smooth grips will give you troubles off road when it's wet and muddy. Get something that works for you off road in bad conditions, where you need it most. You will have no troubles commuting. Gloves: Garden shops sell from heavy duty to light weight fabric/leather protective ...


1

To put simple rubber compound grips I usually use two step procedure. Use extreme degreaser on handlebar, the one that is used to degrease car brake rotors. Then pour some water into grips and then put them on while water is still inside grips. To take them off it's even simplier. I use syringe with water. Stick the needle through grip up until the surface ...


1

Since no one else mentioned this: I always use a glass/window cleaner (like Windex). It works really well. Easy to spray on the bar or in the grip and it evaporates quickly but not as quickly as isopropyl alcohol. Plus I think it has a surfactant which makes things slide a bit easier. And you may be likely to have some around. Usually works to take ...


1

The technique I use is to apply dish washing soap to the metal of the grip so that they are slick and put the grips in boiled water. Leave the water to cool down enough to put your hands in but so that the grips are still warm. The water will cause the grips to expand so that they go on easy, they will shrink back down when they cool. Then simply put the ...


1

Two parts to this question - how to ease off an old grip that you may want to reuse (ie cutting it off is too destructive. Followed by how to fit the new one. I use a thin old electrician's flathead screwdriver to gently lever the edge off the grip up, then I tilt the bike so that it leans to the side I'm working on, and then I squirt a splash of soap and ...


1

You can buy sorbothane sheet or sorbothane strip to wrap around the handle. It will solve your problem. Cover sorbothane with overgrip to protect sorbothane strip.



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