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14

Two solutions I've used: Spray the inside of the grip with hair spray. Slide it on immediately, and then when the hair spray dries, it will glue the grip in place. Use rubbing alcohol. It does not do as good of a job at locking the grip in place, but it does evaporate quickly and doesn't leave any lubricant inside the grip.


8

Hand numbness or tingling can happen for a variety of reasons. It could be a matter of fit, or simply tape or the handlebars themselves. Bike fit: How's your riding posture? If you're putting too much weight on your hands, it could be because you need to raise you saddle to allow you to put some of your weight on your legs. It's also possible you just ...


8

It seems a bit unusual to me that your grip would be actually 'glued' to your handlebar. Typically grips hold themselves in place, but I'll take your word for it. =] If your grip is in fact 'glued' in place, the adhesive is likely mediocre quality, and rotation you're experiencing is due to heat from your hand and/or the outdoors slightly softening the ...


8

Best solution (probably available only at shops): use an air compressor with a narrow tip to inject air between the grip and the handlebar at an angle (like spiralling around). This will create an air cushion and you can move the grip around (keep moving the air jet as you apply the air jet, since only in some positions the air cushion is formed). Less ...


7

Spit. Im not kidding. Saliva is a great lubricant that will dry with little residue, and depending on any sugars in your system, could be a little tacky. I have done this for years.


7

Wipe the bar with isopropyl alcohol. It evaporates completely and will leave dry rubber against a clean bar. If they slip and slide after more than about 24 hours left alone, the you may need to replace the grips (assuming they're not new). The high alcohol content is what makes hairspray effective, and using isopropyl alcohol cuts out the sticky residue ...


5

There certainly are tapes and gloves that help decrease road shock transmitted to the hands. The traditional cinelli cork tape is a bit too hard if you're sensitive to that. Bontrager makes a nice gel tape. I use it, but honestly I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference. IMHO, the core issue might not be one of sufficient padding at all. It could ...


3

Distribute thin zip-ties around the inside of the grip somewhat evenly so that they provide slippery "rails" on which the grip can slide on the bar. Once the grip is in place, pull the zip-ties out (with pliers if necessary).


3

Generally, the problem is due to riding/hand position and the resulting pressure on the hands. You don't say what kind of bar you have, but a traditional "drop" bar is better than a straight bar (absent extensions) for giving you different positions, and within each bar category there are many variations (though finding different bars can be a challenge at ...


3

Which grips you get for a mountain bike is mostly a matter of comfort and personal taste. In terms of how they attach to the bike, there are grips that glue on and grips that screw on. They're exactly what they sound like. Locking grips (that tighten onto the bars with an allen key or a screwdriver) will avoid the grips twisting over time. You can also ...


2

I have had the same problem is the past wit Oury grips. My solution was to use a bit of rubber cement. You only need to apply a little to the bar and inside of the grip. While the cement is still wet, it will slide on smoothly, then dry and secure nicely. Be sure to wipe off any excess that accumulates as you slide the grip on. I have had no trouble getting ...


2

I use Oury Mountain Grips on my mountain bike and my city bike. They have a cheaper slide on version (about $10-12 USD) and a lock on version ($ about $30 USD) which I prefer. The lock on version avoids the 'slippy grip' issues you sometimes have when water eeks under the edge of the grip and it slips on the bars. These grips are smooth and cushy enough ...


2

If you put a flat blade screw driver into the bar whole with the blade between the clip and the grip and gently pry it away from the grip by leveraging on the opposite side of the clip, it should pop off. Or just pull hard with your hand.


2

Choosing a grip is a matter of personal preference. If you're worried about the fact that the Nexus shifters require a smaller grip on one side than the other (due to the shifter taking up room), you can get grips that are made to mate with an internal hub shifter like the Nexus. Alternately, since these can be difficult to locate, you can cut down the ...


2

The Lizard Skins Lock-on Logo grip is 31.06mm in diameter. The Lizard Skins Lock-on North Shore grip is 30.94mm in diameter. Both were measured using a digital caliper, and assuming a small difference in diameter due to texture, they are nominally 31mm diameter grips. The thinner Lizard skins grips measure approximately 29-30mm, again depending on ...


2

Avenir 3D rubber grips on my cruiser bar: Vodka :) Just a splash inside the grips, wriggle them on, and let excess drain outside the end hole.


1

I always used hairspray with my grips, it's the best solution in my opinion. It not only keeps them from slipping too far on/off the handlebars, but keeps them from twisting in place. Now, however, I use locking grips like these: http://www.ebay.com/itm/110736653646?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_1030wt_1163


1

The problem of finger numbness comes from the wrists. When your fingers get tingly, it normally helps to move your hands to a different place on the handlebars. If yours are still getting numb, try (A) reducing the weight on your hands, and (B) doing wrist stretches before AND after you ride.


1

First thing I'd try is washing the grips (inside) with a good detergent and rinsing well. Then clean the bar well and wipe with alcohol. Use only water or alcohol as a lubricant while installing the grips, and give them a few hours to "set" before riding. This would give the rubber its best chance at naturally grabbing the metal bar (which rubber will ...


1

Hairspray works great and you just need to slide a small but long screwdriver inside the grip (and waggle it around) to pull it off, so it is not permanent. The hairspray lets you ease the grip on, which is otherwise very hard to do unless you have access to high-pressure air. The other approaches you have described look like hard work to me and I don't ...


1

Grips come in different materials. I've tried some rubber grips that have a tread pattern. They're quite grippy for when you need to hold on over rough ground. I found though they could be quite abrasive on my hands and that they could actually cause my skin to split. I've switched to some dense foam (ritchy ergo grips) and they still feel grippy enough, ...



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