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11

Anywhere from a month or two to years and years; how long handlebar tape lasts depends on too many factors to really answer this with a number. Of course, how often you cycle is a factor, but how good the tape is and how well it's applied also makes a difference. For example, gel tape is notorious for wearing quickly, as the gel gets pushed away from where ...


8

Hand numbness or tingling can happen for a variety of reasons. It could be a matter of fit, or simply tape or the handlebars themselves. Bike fit: How's your riding posture? If you're putting too much weight on your hands, it could be because you need to raise you saddle to allow you to put some of your weight on your legs. It's also possible you just ...


8

I'd wrap in two passes: first, from the bottom stubs to the join, just crossing over onto the ends of the main bar. Then tape this up tight, to squash it down. Secondly, I'd wrap from the tops of the bar ends around the joins and all the way up to the stem. The second pass should cover up the tape holding the first bit of wrap. Maybe something like this ...


5

The idea is to wrap them so the friction against your hands when riding tightens rather than loosens it. I find I have to swap the direction of wrapping as I go past the shifters. Start at the bar ends and go "up the inside and down the outside" (cw on right, ccw on left). If you do an extra loop around the shifters you can change direction for the tops.


5

There certainly are tapes and gloves that help decrease road shock transmitted to the hands. The traditional cinelli cork tape is a bit too hard if you're sensitive to that. Bontrager makes a nice gel tape. I use it, but honestly I don't think it makes a whole lot of difference. IMHO, the core issue might not be one of sufficient padding at all. It could ...


5

Yes, it is worth it, because it adds to the longevity of the useful period of utility for your tape, and is more likely to be comfortable and stable in the bargain. Ideally, you wrap to the outside of the drops, figure 8 around the hoods, which will leave you wrapping from back to front on the tops. In other words, starting your wrap from the bar end at ...


5

Grab some of the disinfecting wipes in the round containers that you normally use for kitchen counters, etc. I like the Clorox brand in the yellow (Lemon Fresh!). Wrap around bars and squeeze a bit as you twist/rotate in the same direction as the wrap. With cork based wrap this is fairly effective. With some of the slicker surfaced wraps (Lizard, etc), it's ...


4

Try adjusting the angle of your seat, so that the front of your saddle is level to the back of the saddle. This will change your riding position and encourage you to lean forward less.


4

Handlebar tape lasts about 20 years on the typical bike. Of course, the typical bike is ridden 200 miles in the first 5 years and 200 more miles in the next 15. Handlebar tape succumbs to two main problems: Scraping/tearing, when the bike falls down, is laid down, or lays against, say, a brick wall. Twisting/sliding from the pressure of your hands. The ...


3

Double taping or double wrapping is definitely common, and as with all things bicycle there are various opinions on the best way to do it. I do it mostly for comfort, although as with many others I do have hands big enough to comfortably hold the bars when they're bulked up like that (I'm using two layers of foam tape rather than an under-layer of cotton ...


3

Generally, the problem is due to riding/hand position and the resulting pressure on the hands. You don't say what kind of bar you have, but a traditional "drop" bar is better than a straight bar (absent extensions) for giving you different positions, and within each bar category there are many variations (though finding different bars can be a challenge at ...


3

I manage the workshop in one of the busier shops in the world. There is not, to my knowledge, any way to obtain cork or neoprene bar tape which is not pre-cut to length. Usually, in my experience, though, one roll is enough to do both sides of a bullhorn bar.


3

I use the foam grips on my Miyata 1000 LT touring bike. They seem to last forever. They are comfortable for short trips of 10 miles or so, without the use of padded gloves. They do give some insulation advantages in colder weather. They can also be wrapped with cloth tape if you desire to compress the foam a little bit to protect it or if your hands are on ...


2

In addition to adjusting the posture (primarily seat) on the bike, you may also experiment with using slightly less air in your tires, as this will reduce the harshness of ride more than frame material. Bicycle Quarterly has a nice chart on recommended inflation pressures based on weight and bicycle type: http://www.bikequarterly.com/images/TireDrop.pdf ...


2

I once worked through the math, and in order to reduce the pressure on your hands to where you can maintain blood circulation in an average drop bar situation you need bar pads that are about 5" in diameter (which is, obviously, somewhere between impractical and impossible). And standard padded gloves have no different effect from padded bars in this sense. ...


2

I use a cleaning product called Simple Green. It's bio-degradable ( good for the environment ) and really does a complete cleaning job! You can mix it at different strengths from a 1/2 gallon or 1 gallon refill size. It comes in a spray bottle initially. I use it to clean my bicycle rather than soap and water. It is safe to use and doesn't harm the paint. ...


2

I use a citrus degreaser and its great. I clean my entire bike with it, but it gets the sweat and oils off the tape so the dirt stops sticking.


1

It comes down to your own preferences. I always wrap mine counter-clockwise on the right side and clockwise on the left side. (seen from riders perspective).. Edit: You probably shouldn't go the same way around on both sides, thoght. The look and feel would be all wrong ;) The only tricky part is where you go around the shifters.


1

Most bar-end shifters require friction between the bar's interior surface to stay put, so no. Install the shifters securely and tape the shifter housing about where you would like it to emerge from the bar tape. You will end up wrapping over the first few inches of shifter housing before it loops forward and may require a bit of futzing to get it looking ...


1

I found that many drop bars are too skinny, putting a lot of pressure on a very small area of my hands. A wider gripping surface seemed to help relieve a lot of pressure. Consider adding some Bar Shapers under the tape. You can also add some Bar Phat under the tape to give more gel-cushioning. Then you don't have to use your padded gloves all the time.


1

With some Googling, I was able to find this bulk bar tape. However, at $156 for about 10 bars worth, it doesn't seem like you get much of a deal. Plus the site looks really shady. But if you aren't wasting so much, it might end up as a net positive for you. But it does confirm that such a product does exist. Try to look for a reputable retailer to sell ...


1

I have wrapped bars both ways, and have never really noticed a difference. That said, I do now reverse the direction of the wraps due to personal preference.


1

The problem of finger numbness comes from the wrists. When your fingers get tingly, it normally helps to move your hands to a different place on the handlebars. If yours are still getting numb, try (A) reducing the weight on your hands, and (B) doing wrist stretches before AND after you ride.



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