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37

There are 3 basic hand positions that most people use on a drop bar: Hand position 1: On the Hoods - This position allows you to reach the brakes and shifters without moving your and allows a fairly upright, and comfortable body position. Most riders spend 75-90% of their miles in this position. Hand position 2: On the Drops - This position is ideal for ...


16

Bar ends are typically banned from group/club rides because of the potential to hook another rider when riding in a tight group. Because a flat MTB-style handlebar is wider than a drop bar, adding bar ends increases the likelihood of snagging another rider. (drop bars still can cause crashes though, which I've seen first hand) On the plus side, adding bar ...


15

Report it to his insurance company first. Period. If for whatever reason the driver decides to renege on his admittance of fault and declines to pay damages to your bike, you're basically screwed if you're past the insurance company's reporting threshold. However, do not sign any paperwork the insurance company asks you to (which may limit their liability ...


14

Two solutions I've used: Spray the inside of the grip with hair spray. Slide it on immediately, and then when the hair spray dries, it will glue the grip in place. Use rubbing alcohol. It does not do as good of a job at locking the grip in place, but it does evaporate quickly and doesn't leave any lubricant inside the grip.


14

"Middle of the bar", "On the tops", "Middle", "Top", "Tops", "Center" Hands on the part of the bar closest to the stem. The middle has some width and you can slide your hands around there. "On the corners", "Corners" Hands at the outside end of the section where the bar turns. You can grip the corner different ways. There's a sort of position in between ...


13

John Duggan wrote an excellent checklist for what to do after a bike/car crash. It sounds like you've already handled the first part pretty well, but here are the steps he advises: Do get the necessary medical treatment. Do have your bike thoroughly inspected by a reputable bike shop. Do take photographs of the accident scene, your injuries, your ...


12

I did this on my previous bike, and while it was a lot of fun (and I enjoyed riding the resulting bike) it was also quite expensive, almost half the cost of the bike. You should also be prepared to put in a fair amount of research to determine if all the parts will work together. Here's what's involved: New bars (of course) New stem -- unless you can ...


11

There is no single official accepted guidance. Typically the more you ride, the lower you will tolerate your bars, drops or straights. Pro cyclists have them as low as 10-15 cm below saddle, while amateurs tend to have them level or slightly higher than the saddle. Don't worry that you cannot spend all your time in drops. Even pro cyclists prefer the more ...


11

Anywhere from a month or two to years and years; how long handlebar tape lasts depends on too many factors to really answer this with a number. Of course, how often you cycle is a factor, but how good the tape is and how well it's applied also makes a difference. For example, gel tape is notorious for wearing quickly, as the gel gets pushed away from where ...


10

For a city commuter bike, don't bother with disk brakes - go for simple rim brakes. You'll want the reliability over all else. You don't need disks for most types of road cycling, as the limiting factor for grip is likely to be your tyre anyway. As regards shifters, go with whatever is comfortable for you. I like the combination of brakes and gear levers in ...


9

Drop bars in of themselves are fine for winter riding. However, there are some peripheral issues involved. Your average flat bars will offer a bit more control in slippery conditions because flat bars are much, much wider than drop bars. A bike equipped with drop bars may not be the best bike for winter riding. But properly configured and sized drops can be ...


9

I commute every day in SF with drop bars. It's not an issue for me. You quickly adapt to the hand position, if you bike is set up in a way that is comfortable for you. The real safety issue you should be worried about, IMHO is not braking itself, but rather the "heads-down" position you can be in on the bike itself. You have to get used to looking around ...


8

It seems a bit unusual to me that your grip would be actually 'glued' to your handlebar. Typically grips hold themselves in place, but I'll take your word for it. =] If your grip is in fact 'glued' in place, the adhesive is likely mediocre quality, and rotation you're experiencing is due to heat from your hand and/or the outdoors slightly softening the ...


8

Hand numbness or tingling can happen for a variety of reasons. It could be a matter of fit, or simply tape or the handlebars themselves. Bike fit: How's your riding posture? If you're putting too much weight on your hands, it could be because you need to raise you saddle to allow you to put some of your weight on your legs. It's also possible you just ...


8

Best solution (probably available only at shops): use an air compressor with a narrow tip to inject air between the grip and the handlebar at an angle (like spiralling around). This will create an air cushion and you can move the grip around (keep moving the air jet as you apply the air jet, since only in some positions the air cushion is formed). Less ...


8

What you're looking for are called Cross or Interrupter levers (i.e. they interrupt the brake cable housing--the cable passes through them. It is worth noting that in the video the cables protruding from the sides of the brake hoods are shifter cables...the brake cable is routed under the handlebar tape to the cross levers). Most setups are designed to work ...


8

For a short commute in street clothes I opted for flat bars with bar end extentions. This allows some different hand positions and for me a more comfortable upright position. If you are riding for the first time is several years, bike fit is more critical than bar type. A bike that is the wrong size will never be comfortable no matter what type bar it has.


8

I commute 12 miles a day to work on a track bike with drops and have never had a problem. The real advice is: if they work for you, they work. If you find it uncomfortable or inefficient, switch. Get your wheel flipped and enjoy the ride! As a sidenote, I'd recommend keeping both your brakes on. Otherwise, you could end up somersaulting.


8

Drop bars The main advantage of drop bars is that you have a variety of positions for your hands, giving you options to make you more aerodynamic or just have a change if you get a bit sore in one spot. Additionally, having your hands 'pointing forward' is a more neutral position for your shoulders, where flat bars cause them to rotate outwards. Related ...


7

Wipe the bar with isopropyl alcohol. It evaporates completely and will leave dry rubber against a clean bar. If they slip and slide after more than about 24 hours left alone, the you may need to replace the grips (assuming they're not new). The high alcohol content is what makes hairspray effective, and using isopropyl alcohol cuts out the sticky residue ...


7

Measure the handlebar itself, while unmounted from the bike, at the center most point of the bar. Use a digital or vernier scale caliper. The bar from the 2009 Bianchi Cortina is a 25.4mm MTB handlebar, with about 2 inches of rise. I expect yours will be as well. Do not use a 26mm bar, although you can likely mount it on the stem, because the installation ...


7

I love a good drop bar, but if you're only going 4 miles, an upright position might be more comfortable for you, especially if you're starting to commute for the first time. Start with your basic commuter bike if you want, something that looks like this, with some flat handle bars. http://s7d4.scene7.com/is/image/TrekBicycleProducts/52049 Head to a bike ...


7

First off, understand that the geometry of the bike affects stability, especially the "marriage" between head angle and fork rake. Adjusting these parameters (which can really only be "adjusted" by the frame builder) has a very dramatic effect on stability. Beyond that, the hand position has an effect in a couple of ways. First, if the hand position is ...


6

Handlebar type and shape is largely a matter of personal preference - especially on trendy fixed-gear and single speed bikes. I would sell it as is. If you change the handlebar there is a likely possibility that you will also have to change the brake handle. That's a lot of needless expense. Let the buyer swap it out if they want something different.


6

With any number of brake puller solutions such as this: http://www.amazon.com/Problem-Solvers-Cable-Doubler-Levers/dp/B001CK0R64 you can have as many levers as you want. Installing an additional lever and cabling isn't hard but if you don't want to do it your LBS will have no problem.


6

It has consistently worked for me: Disassemble everything around the zone of noise suspicion, namely remove the handlebar from the stem and separate every bolt and washer away from each other; Clean them with light solvent or oil (the idea is not to degrease, but more to remove dust/rust/dirt and to allow a residual layer of lubrication to remain); Apply ...


6

They are unstable because of how your weight shifts on the bike when you move to the aerobars. Hybrids are not really designed to have aerobars, the geometry doesn't really lend itself to that. My suggestion would be to get rid of the aerobars, and get handlebar extensions for the ends of the bars, much like you see on many mountain bikes. This will allow ...


6

The noise is coming from your handlebars, but in my experience noises can be deceptive. It may be your stem-handlebar interface, but it may not be isolated to that one spot. The first thing to check is that the tabs on the face plate are not meeting the body of the stem when everything is torqued down. If you can see a gap there, you should be ok. If they ...


6

Sounds like you want to use your current V-Brakes, but if getting new brakes, TRP makes mini V-Brakes that are STI lever compatible, sometimes called a brifter (brakes and shifting in one lever). Most V-Brakes have a different pull ratio which is not compatible with brifters. The TRP CX9 is for Shimano STI levers The TRP CX8.4 is for SRAM and Campagnolo ...


6

At the shop we generally use a "normal" hacksaw blade. I'd go with finer blade (more teeth per inch) if there's an option. Go slow and smooth (long low pressure strokes) and keep the blade perpendicular to the bars. The tape will probably help but do take care removing the tape or you might cause the fray you're trying to avoid. There are special carbon ...



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