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I found it is called speed wobble. It can come from loose headset, loose spokes, bad tire, misaligned wheel, too-high saddle (http://www.roadbikerider.com/advanced-skills/speed-wobble), geometry and physiology might be the problem (http://cyclingtips.com.au/2011/03/speed-wobble-when-the-bike-shakes-its-head/). One way to avoid it is to hold the top tube in ...


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Purefix makes a 22.2mm bullhorn bar: https://www.purefixcycles.com/products/bull-horn-bars I'm thinking about trying it out on my commuter build.


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With loose handlebars, the primary thing which you should be worrying about is your face - its a great way to lead to a nasty crash. Don't ride with loose parts on your bike. Speed is the last thing you should be worrying about. You likely went slower due to less control of the bike with loose handlebars making your brain hold you back on speed. Other ...


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I always use a spreadsheet to make stem, spacers and handlebar calculations. I find it makes best sense when comparing one setup, that exists and I have used, with another that might be real or hypothetical. Here's an example where I'm considering changing the Pro Vibe 7s on my track bike to a Deda Newton deep drop and if I need to change the stem and/or ...


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As PeteH commented, possibly a bad headset (could be worn headset or bearings need maintenance or replacement or the bearing may simply have been overtightened) As we ride, small corrections are constantly made, left, right,, left, right... When the handlebars/fork can't turn smoothly, these corrections become exaggerated - too much to the left, then too ...


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Then this is what I would try. Call the corners of the T of the H NW NE SE SW. On left side start from inside and wrap going forward on the top of the bar to the T from NE across bottom to SW across top back to NE across bottom to SE across top to NW across bottom to SE one full wrap on South across top to NW wrap to north to bar ...


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I'd wrap in two passes: first, from the bottom stubs to the join, just crossing over onto the ends of the main bar. Then tape this up tight, to squash it down. Secondly, I'd wrap from the tops of the bar ends around the joins and all the way up to the stem. The second pass should cover up the tape holding the first bit of wrap. Maybe something like this ...


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Different bikes can have different geometry. The head tube (the tube that continues the line of the front forks up to the handlebars) angle has a big effect on how the bike handles. A steeper head tube makes the bike more "twitchy". You can feel like you're all over the place. A bike like this would be a more serious road bike, and if you are used to using ...


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@headeronly has the best answer, but this is a great supplementary quote from The Rules: The Way of the Cycling Disciple by The Velominati. It's a tongue-in-cheek book but illuminates the problems nicely. For a while, aerobars were allowed in one-day races and road-race stages of Grand Tours. But this presented a new problem; when a rider’s grip on ...



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