New answers tagged

1

Will they be an advantage? Depends. They may be an aerodynamic advantage but a handling and physical fatigue and wear disadvantage. With the aero position comes a very unnatural neck angle needed to look straight ahead. You may say 'oh well I'll just rest and look straight down for a sec' and soon you might be picking weeds out of your teeth. I've done ...


2

Collectively, some good advice here. I first used tri-bars (sometimes referred to as aero-bars) for long rides back 30 years ago, on a touring bike. The two biggest benefits were: extra position to to take the weight off my hands and put the body/back into a different position (you lean further forward) less wind resistance and easier pedaling, especially ...


0

A friends of mine just installed aero bars, we went for a 150 km ride. The aerobar advantages are mainly useful in flat terrain. If you have many uphill / downhill you will be using the side handles. And he reported shifting gears was quite annoying compared to brifter shifting. I wouldn't do it, it is for getting faster speed not for comfort or safety. ...


4

They would be yes. Beyond the advantage of providing an additional position, they actually provide a bigger benefit of (properly setup) a more aero position. Theoretically this could increase your average speed and provide you with less time in the saddle. All things equal, I consider the extra position (when you already have ~4) to be a minimal impact. ...


8

I would suggest attaching the bars and doing some test rides. Is your bike, with it's aggressive geometry, stable when using them? Are you comfortable using them? Does this new position provide some relief, or is it just more annoying? I think you're the only one who can determine if they'll be an advantage to you. In general, I'd think the extra ...


1

Grips are cheap - buy some new ones. If you really want to save these, turn them over so what was inboard is now on the outside. Or swap left for right. The clamp should be onto the solid metal of your bars, not floating loose in the air. In addition there should be bar plugs into the end - these are glorified rubber or plastic corks which help prevent ...


2

Short answer, no! Almost certainly the entire grip should be on the handlebar. Then the 2 pieces of steel pushed in by the screws will tighten against the handlebar giving much better security. The steel pieces should go in the cutouts on the hard plastic inner of the grip. I'm not sure how well the grips will work now that they are missing some of their ...


1

Yes, this answer is a couple years behind. Some manufacturers measure overall outside to outside others center of the tube to center of the tube.(for ease of measuring, center to center is the same as inside edge of one to outside edge of the other) Generally measured at the tips as this provides the easiest point to get an accurate repeatable measurement. ...


1

Hair spray works best, lubricates when wet, sticks when it dries.


3

If you have access to a compressor, compressed air works well – use the hole in the end of the grip to blow in air while covering the other end of the bars with your hand (or something). The air escaping around the grip opens it up enough that it is easy to slide on. Rubbing alcohol can be used as a lubricant. It will evaporate leaving the grips snug on the ...



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