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2

There are four measurements you need to be concerned with. The two most critical are the fork steerer diameter and the bar clamp diameter. The fork steerer diameter is normally referred to as 1", 1-1/8", or in some cases 1-1/2". The bar clamp diameter can be 1"/25.4mm (typically MTB), 26mm (typically road), 1-1/8"/31.8mm (commonly called oversized or OS). ...


2

1 and 1/8" is referring to the diameter steerer tube that the stem is designed to fit. 1-1/8" is roughly 28.5 mm, very close to the steerer tube you measured, that seems to check out, though try obtaining a steerer tube measurement in inches. 25.4, 26, 31.8 are your options for handlebar diameter, so hopefully you can match a set of handlebars you like to ...


1

As others have said, I think you would adjust to a drop bar with a little practice. Most of the time you will ride with hands on the top bar anyway (make sure the brakes are positioned so you can still reach them from this position). In my experience drop bars come into their own when you are going fast and/or into the wind, you will quickly realise that ...


1

It may be trial and error but you can get a fit that works. What I did for a starting point is to measure my flat bar bike that I found comfortable. With the bikes sitting on the wheels, I measured the saddle height and the handlebar height. I then measured the length from the saddle to the bar center. With those measurements I set up the drop bar bike as ...


3

I have never had professional fitting - just adjusted until it felt right. I am sure a professional fitting would be nice but I just did not want to spend my money on one. A road bike might not be the best bike for you. In a drop bar consider cyclocoss or light touring. Some companies have a drop bar "commuter". They are going to have bigger tires and ...


0

Maybe slightly off-topic, but I would like to share. Past summer my touring/commuter MTB looked like this. The advantages of this bar ends position, compared to in the end of the handlebars are several. First, a more narrow and aerodynamic position is assumed. Second, standard grips can be used, without the need to cut them. Thirdly, for some reason those ...


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Unless you have sharpened your outward facing bar-ends or better yet, have installed a Ben-Hur Chariot Wheel Spike on your bicycle hub, I would not be overly concerned about snagging another rider unless you are Doctor Hofmann. A greater threat to cycling involves the disruption of centrifugal forces due to a single valve stem. Placing a counter-weight on ...


0

I wrap inward and use a 3 figure eights or outward and use 2. This sets it up so the tape is wrapping towards the rider for the tops. I also use upside down electrical tape below the grifters and near the drops. I don't use the press in plugs if I can find the screw type compression plugs so the tape at the ends is a must. It also makes starting easier. ...



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