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1

It’s not only a matter of handlebar type. You can already try to get into a more aerodynamic position with your straight handlebar. A shorter straight handlebar can be quite aerodynamic. On a road bike the drops are mostly used for descents, normaly one uses the “hoods” or the tops which aren’t all that “aggressive” or overly aerodynamic. See also ...


1

Drop bars are possible, but you need to measure the effective top tube of your frame and the "reach" of a new drop bar you want to purchase. You didn't tell what hybrid bike you have but I assume the effective top tube on your bike is longer than ones on road bikes. Another consideration is that drop bars have additional reach forward (70-80mm). There's ...


1

I'd start off just riding your bike and noticing what you like (and don't like about your position). Mostly I'd worry about the bars being too low and not having enough options (get low to get out of the wind, sit up straight when your back or neck needs a break, and on and on...). The important thing is that you're comfortable – and as long as the bike ...


1

When spending more time on your bike, it's good to be able to vary your position. For that reason alone I would advice a drop bar or butterfly bar. It'll prevent all kind of small complaints about wrists, shoulders and back. Getting in better shape because of the extra daily exercise, you'll gradually feel more comfortable in a more sportive (aerodynamic) ...


1

The bars are 100% not steel. Steel bars are almost always found only on track bikes and are almost always chrome plated or polished. That bike looks to be an entry level Bianchi (note the Sora shifters) so the bars are almost certainly the stock alloy models it shipped with. Bottom line is aluminum is a metal that doesn't like to be repeatedly bent. It's ...


2

If the bars are steel, it might be possible to bend them back safely, although difficult (steel bars are very stiff). If the bars are aluminum, throw them away. Aluminum, especially high strength aluminum, is very susceptible to metal fatigue.


3

Proper fit in an aerobar posture is designed to allow you to race well. In order to race well you will need to be comfortable enough to produce power, to reduce aerodynamic drag, and to handle the bike well and safely for the duration of your race. If your fit otherwise meets all your needs, you shouldn't be concerned about where your knee is positioned ...


2

I went from 42cm to 40cm bars on a road bike and experienced the same symptoms. The switch to narrower bars can definitely cause tricep pain at the elbow. So, yes, tricep pain can be a symptom of narrow bars (it could be from other things too). Whether it is a temporary or a permanent symptom can be gleaned by how you feel after you've had some time to ...


5

At 10 o'clock there is a wedge that holds the handlebar. Taking off the plastic cap at the end of the stem reveals the bolts for tightening the stem and handlebar.


1

This is exactly the case where Wikipedia comes in handy, here are some quotes from the article on 3D printing with metals: Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is an additive manufacturing technique that uses a laser as the power source to sinter powdered material (typically metal), aiming the laser automatically at points in space defined by a 3D ...


2

The answer is NOBODY. Jones is the only manufacturer of the closed loop H-bar. After nearly a year of searching for a cheaper alternative I finally just bit the bullet and ordered the bar from Jones. It would have been better if I had ordered it sooner instead of holding out in hopes of finding an alternative manufacturer, I really got dinged by exchange ...


1

This is how. An engineer explains: Basically, it's a layering process. Layer by layer, the 3D printer lays down a thin sheet of powdered titanium and a laser melts and fuses that ...



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