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8

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


4

Sounds like a major fluid loss, somewhere. Check around the hose joints, and the brake levers and calipers for fluid leakage. If not, it's probably a blown piston seal, which in rare cases can leak, but reseal under low fluid pressure.


3

From your install manual, the "Burnish" period is only 30-40 stops, so you should be beyond that. If the bike is still within a month or two of purchase, I would suggest taking the bike back to the shop and playing dumb. They sold you the bike, they should fix the brakes that aren't working properly. If they say, "they're supposed to do that", I'd suggest ...


3

Your problem may be that you're misunderstanding mechanical disc brakes. On most, only the outside pad moves, the disc is bent onto the inside pad. This means the loosen, clamp and tighten method doesn't work. You can do it by eye, or use a spacer between the inside pad and disk when you tighten it up. Hayes install instructions are here.


2

I'm looking at the Hayes manual https://www.hayesdiscbrake.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/45-20182J_Mech-Brake-Install.pdf for "how to mount caliper to fork". Oddly, it doesn't seem to specify how the pad offsets should be set, so that may explain why you have ended up with the outer pad all the way out. I suggest this: Wind inner and out all the way out. ...


2

Before you do anything else, confirm that the axle is properly seated in the dropouts. Unless the dropouts are resting solidly on the axle on both sides the wheel will be slightly cocked and it is likely that the disc will drag. Working on a bike stand it is particularly challenging to get the wheel properly into place – you need about three hands to hold ...


2

Ring the bike shop before doing anything. They may prefer you take it back to them rather than try to fix it yourself. All it probably needs a calliper alignment. Briefly - Loosen the two bolts holding the calliper so its free to move but is not sloppy. Slowly bring the brakes on while spinning the wheel. Once the brakes are on tight, without releasing ...


2

I can't imagine how it did it as I didn't think there would be enough clearance between calliper and rotor, but the actual problem now I have gotten around to pulling off the back wheel is that the mobile pad got thrown and hence no fluid leak just a missing pad. @zenbike thanks for answer however.


2

Just throwing out something I found - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KpdTKzgoVGk. my apologies if this missed the mark.



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