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31

It is worth noting that deaf people cycle perfectly well. @Joe's excellent comment merit's adding into the answer... Edit It should also be noted that deaf people are used to being deaf. They never rely on sounds like hearing-abled people do. Its OK to listen to music as long as a) you are aware that you don't have any audio clues to hazards b) don't ...


27

As you gain more experience in biking, you will learn to rely on your hearing as a fairly important input in your ability to make decisions. This applies to various disciplines of biking in the following ways: Urban: Cars starting up, parked cars cars with engine running, cars you can't yet see roaring up driveways or out of parking garages, and certain ...


17

Wearing headphones while cycling is a bad idea even if only one ear-bud is in use. I do my best to devote complete attention to the road and my surroundings while I'm riding. For hearing folks, sound is a critical device to alert a rider to impending danger. During my daily commute I frequently am alerted to potential hazards by sound before I see a ...


17

The main reason that I can think of is avoiding collisions with other riders, cars, pedestrians, etc. If someone tries to get your attention, it's still going to be harder to hear them. I'd say that if you want to listen to music, use only one earbud and keep the volume down.


16

I used to listen to an iPod while riding (commuting in a city) but decided it wasn't worth the chance of not hearing the monster trucks in time. Haven't listened to anything while riding for 3 years now. I don't really miss it, but my ride's only 30-40 minutes long. I do like hearing the sounds of the river valley along the ride, which I missed completely ...


12

Some anecdotal evidence seems to suggest that riding while listening to music using headphones is not safe: Teen cyclist wearing headphones when she turned into car Peril of headphones exposed after girl cyclist dies in crash Headphone danger warning after cyclist using iPod hit by tram Bottom line is that when you ride a bicycle in traffic, you are ...


9

It is illegal to wear headphones while riding in some locations. Such as here. But not Here (although I think it is illegal to wear them on Chicago's lakefront path, but I can't find the reference. Might be wrong). There is a post here that makes the point that many localities apply the same laws to driving as cycling (I can't comment on the truth of that). ...


8

I learned the lesson to this the hard way, by crashing into the back of a car. I was not paying attention to my riding due to the music coming from my Sony Walkman. The people in the car were okay, however, it was embarrassing to peel myself off their boot and then take my headphones off. That act of taking the headphones off was 'the game is up' for the ...


7

I'd be lying if I said I didn't listen to music while cycling ... especially at night (probably the worst time). That said ... I wouldn't really recommend it. Alot of the subtle drive train noises that could signify impending doom (for your bicycle) can be missed (ex. stick in derailleur, tyre deflating after running through a patch of glass...) when ...


5

I have enjoyed years of cycling to music using speakers on my bike. Now that I have an iPhone with speakers, I mount it on my handlebars and go. Its loud enough to hear but as soon as a vehicle get near me, the music is drowned out - therefore no vehicle sneaks up on me. Also, not having headphones/earbuds on also makes me feel less restricted and I ...


5

I cycle with one ear in (on the nearside), that way I can still hear the road-side. I know that some disagree, but in my experience, this is enough to get me by. It's no more distracting than a car having its radio on - albeit we are more exposed. I tend to listen to podcasts and I frequently realise that I haven't actually been paying attention to the ...


5

I'm not sure there's a best type for cycling, but the latter two examples have their pros and cons and I think you pretty much nailed them. The last type you posted is going to give you a good snug fit but without the noise isolation of the in ear type (2nd example) which isn't great for listening to music given the wind noise, but for safety reasons is ...


4

I use a combination of a single earbud (currently Sennheiser CX380s) with a head band (I've 3 Assos headbands in rotation: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?PartnerID=79&ModelID=38937). The headband both stops the sweat rolling into the eyes but also routes the wind around the ear. (I do generally wear a lid, so the headband doesn't look ...


4

I listen with only one iPod earbud for commuting, as California state law says you can. I think its no different than a car stereo. As for different headsets, I think that the jogging type (that wrap around your ear) would be good. I wouldn't go with the squishy plastic in-ear kinds, because they seem to block out too much outside sound. Hope this helps.


4

I've been listening to music and podcasts while riding for 10+ years and never had the slightest problem hearing traffic or other cyclists. I definitely recommend podcasts or talk radio as music has to be much louder to be heard over the traffic noise (cars are really loud!) I've never understood this debate, as if anyone would spend 4 hours in a car with ...


3

So far I've been happy just utilizing the stock external speakers built into my phone with it mounted on my handlebars. On my roadbike, I'm typically close enough to the handlebars to hear it fine and I can still hear the noise from the road perfectly well. It's been plenty loud for my needs. The only thing that may be an issue is being slightly embarrassed ...


3

There are products like these: http://www.iworld.co.uk/p/Slipstreamz_Cycling_Earwear_for_Headphones.htm?affiliatecode=gbase which move your earbuds outside of your ear and cut down on wind noise. I remember seeing some specialist earbuds which appeared to be a hollow tube earlier this year, they were supposed to allow you to listen to your music and hear ...


3

I use a pair of the basic Apple ear buds that came with my iPod Shuffle for riding. I've found that they put out "ok" quality sound (not as good as my Sennheisers), but the open-air design of them lets a lot of road noise through, as well. I can hear almost any car coming up behind me (including hybrids), and can hear about 90% of the bicycles coming up to ...


2

I don't like wearing headphones while cycling because it takes away from an asset I rely on heavily: my hearing. But if you choose to rock and ride, here's some useful information: http://www.bikebiz.com/news/read/cyclists-with-ipods-hear-the-same-as-motorists-listening-to-nothing/013329


2

I think you pretty much nailed the main issues regarding fit and hearing the surroundings. True in-ears are a hazard if you keep the volume too high. One issue I missed you your discussion is sweat resistance. I don't know how long your commute is, but depending on length and effort I find that I eventually get my headphones wet, and I found headphones are ...


2

Another thing to consider is to have a portable speaker mounted on the bike or in a backpack. Perhaps a bit bulky, but it means your ears can compensate as they would do in a normal setting. A good friend of mine uses a case speaker with phone/iPod inside and has that strapped to the handlebar and stem with bungy cords. Not a particularly elegant solution ...


2

If you are wearing a helmet, you could try Slipstreamz The Slip. These attach to your helmet straps, and reduce wind noise, so may improve your hearing of traffic. You can fit earphones inside them, so they are held just outside your ear. So you can hear your music, and still hear noise from your surroundings.


2

I have always used a radio when riding, and never considered it being a safety issue because I don't have the volume so high that someone standing next to me could hear it. I value my hearing very much! I use the over the ear speakers by either Phillips or Sony. I've been wearing these for years and have never had any conflicts with traffic because I keep ...


2

Not exactly the same category, but I use Creative Aurvana Live! They cut off most of the sound from outside (including wind), so you need to rely on your sight more.


2

The trouble is, you might be the most sensible, perceptive guy on this earth, with bike handling skills second-to-none. But you have no idea who the dick in the car is. As Javier says, play the odds and give yourself the best chance possible.


1

I use headphones when I am POSITIVELY ABSOLUTELY TOTALLY sure that no cars are going to be around. I don't feel that is a problem. But only in that situation. As soon as the cars enter into the game, you are risking your life. Don't gamble.


1

You might want to look at this before deciding to ride with earphones. You could always wear a hat that covers your ears to block the wind. I think that most in-ear phones will be affected by wind, maybe you could try some over-the-ears types.


1

I have listened to my radio using ear buds for over 20 years while riding. I don't have the volume loud, just enough to hear the music or talk radio station. To me, it's very similar to listening to a radio in a vehicle. I've always pretty much depended on my two rear view mirrors to pick up a vehicle approaching from the rear much further back than I could ...


1

I typically listen to just the right side of my shuffle's headphones. That way I have a fighting chance of hearing anyone calling out to pass. I've had this site bookmarked for quite some time now: http://www.scansound.com/xcart/home.php?cat=269 That's what I'm going to try next. All channels in one bud. Should help. All that said, when I'm actually on a ...


1

I think that a distinction needs to be made between a Podcast and music. I think that listening to talk is ok while riding, and will do that. Or I will talk on the phone, since my 'music' device is my Blackberry. Music however is different than talk. Talk is usually quieter, not as continuous, and easy to hear car and traffic noises over it as background ...



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