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8

I would get a fork with a steerer that fits the frame. The expense and risk of modifying your existing fork won't be worth it. There were some mountain bike forks with replacement steerer tubes but they didn't allow for changes of size or type of steerer. They were 1 1/8" threadless and so was the replacement. You also want to match the fork rake/angle that ...


7

The easiest solution is to use the right tool to make sure the star nut is aligned and set to the right depth in the steerer tube. I'd really recommend taking this to a shop and asking to borrow the proper tool. I own one, even though it only gets used once or twice per year. I've tended to go more towards compression plugs instead of the old star-fangled ...


7

I'm going to recommend that you NOT do this. There were in the past manufacturers of 1" steerer suspension forks - though I'm not certain that they're are still sold. It is important to note that bicycle frames built to accept solid steel forks have different geometry than those built for suspension forks. The frame is designed for a fork that doesn't have ...


6

The bottom ring is used to provide tension against the bearings to stop the headset from wobbling around. It only needs to be hand tight, hence no spanner/tool attachments. The middle and top ring are tightened against each other, as a lock ring to prevent the bottom ring from loosening. The top ring can be tightened with any spanner of the right size. ...


6

It sounds like your headset is not adjusted. Your stem cap is used to adjust this. Specifically, the more you tighten the stem cap, the tighter the bearings will get, and the less play you will feel. Here is a picture from Sheldon Brown's article on adjust headsets: My process for checking headset adjustment: Check the headset adjust: Grab the front ...


5

Agree with ewwhite above, using the right tool will save you a lot of hassles and having to go to the shop with your tail between your legs. But, as also mentioned, threading the bolt into the star nut and tapping in carefully can work. Watch the alignment since the star nut will tend not to insert evenly. If you have a longer bolt you can insert it ...


4

2 things: While many older forks used replaceable steerer tubes, the steerer tube is still specifically shaped for that fork. Tubing will not do it. You need an oem replacement steerer tube. Nobody makes forks like that anymore, hence the lack of google results. Also, that steerer tube in the photo looks to be steel, and should not be replaced with ...


4

The compression ring is a wedge. There will always be space and movement here, until the headset is assembled and adjusted. It looks like you're missing a part. There should be another hoop with a wedge shape and a split. It's the split ring on the upper left in the image below. This part is what grips the steerer tube tight and will eliminate the clonking ...


3

I've never cracked a crown race after assembling many different bikes with different fork/headset configurations. Split crown race makes things far easier and it means one less specialty tool that you need to own or access to get the job done. I've never had an issue with split races either. As for splitting your own, lots of people do it without issues, if ...


3

That is a semi integrated head tube to be used with semi integrated head set, a fully integrated head tubes machining is different , it would have a precis depth and an 45 degree angle to it , in order to match fully integrated bearings and yield a exact final bearing depth . When useing a semi integrated system the cup or race you press into the head tube ...


3

You can get a close approximation if you have access to a trainer. Install the bike in the trainer with the fork and headset installed. Using a front wheel riser block will make the fit closer to your actual riding position. You can now install the stem at any height you like. When you find something close measure the gap between the bottom of the stem and ...


3

I think you should use the "recommended" way to do that (even if that means using a home-made solution: Find two plates (wood, metal) which you can drill a hole through; Put each one of these (already drilled) plates on each end of the head tube, with the cups already positioned for insertion; Insert a long bolt or threaded rod through it all; Insert two ...


3

In most headset designs, bearings sit between a pair of cups and races, one half on the fork steerer and the other half press-fit into the head tube. If the cups are not parallel at both ends of the head tube, then you'll find it difficult to adjust the headset to the proper tension without binding - the cup will be meeting the race at an angle and it can ...


3

From Sheldon Brown: Grease lubrication is commonly used on all ball bearings. Good mechanics also use grease (or oil) on the threads of most threaded fittings and fasteners, and also inside the steerer (to keep the stem from becoming stuck) and the seat tube (to keep the seatpost from becoming stuck.) There are a great many different greases on the ...


3

Crunchy headset == bad. I'm assuming the stem is already out of the bike. Measure the stack height before you take it apart. If it's a threaded headset, you will need 2 wrenches. One to loosen the locknut an the other to hold the adjustable race nut steady. You may need a specialty headset wrench to get at the adjustable race nut since they are very ...


3

Here's an excerpt from Chris King about headset types: What is an “Integrated” headset? It is a bicycle frame, fork and bearing system designed to eliminate the humble headset cup. To integrate means to combine and hopefully to simplify. What has been “integrated” by the integrated headset? The bearings now rest inside the frame instead of ...


3

The cranks are always spun in the same direction and the threads are located so the cups don't get loose. The headset does not have a direction where the spinning is happening and it is not possible to have self-tighning cups. Also fork gives vertical load, directed into the threads. Also there is a big frontal load on the fork which will be transferred ...


2

Tapered headsets with a larger lower bearing are becoming more common on road bikes. Doesn't make any difference to what stems fit, but if you are replacing a headset (or fork), it matters. e.g. http://www.fullspeedahead.com/category_list/53/HEADSETS (And 1" threadless headsets also exist. Most likely to be on an older bike that has had a new headset ...


2

I think that the torque needed to seat the stem snugly enough is way smaller than that which would damage the steering tube. And by the piece image and design, I would say the tension that is correct to seat the headset bearings is good to keep the plug inside too. By the way, after you tighten the stem bolts, you could even take the plug out of the bike ...


2

If you have the fork in hand, it's easy enough to directly measure the outer diameter of the steerer tube using a set of calipers or a ruler across the top. The common threaded headset size is 1" (25.4mm), but 1 1/8" (28.6mm) is not unheard of. If you have only the frame and are trying to measure from the inner diameter of the head tube, then you are ...


2

I figured out what was causing the problem. I had used the compression ring in the place of the crown race. I did this because I lost the crown race and the compression ring looks similar. FYI crown races for threadless headsets aren't standard, if you need to replace one you have to get one that matches your make and model.


2

For most modern, quality frames it is not necessary, unless you have a problem in which case it might be worth a try. Sometimes it's just a matter of getting down to bare metal, sometimes the tolerances are indeed a little off and the surfaces of the top and bottom of the headtube aren't perfectly parallel. There's less danger in facing a headtube than there ...


2

In the end I put the nut bottom-up on an old piece of carpet, held the forks upside down and struck the nut into the steerer tube with medium force. It went in fairly flat. Then I screwed in the bolt and tapped it in carefully. It's actually quite straight. I don't think I'd recommend this method: I may have just been lucky this time. I do have the ...


2

Can't tell from the picture as it's not assembled to that point, but you should also make sure you have enough of a gap for the compression to be effective. Before you put on the top cap, the steer tube should be approx 5mm below whatever spacer, seal, etc that you have as the topmost element. If there is not enough space for complete you will get the ...


2

Short answer, buy a new fork that fits. Long answer, you are not able to safely extend the length of the fork, and trying will result in injury. There are headsets available to deal with the size difference on the steerer tube, but if the steerer is that short, you won't be able to mount a stem and handlebar. In addition, if it is a threaded 1" fork, the ...


2

It is true that integrated headsets can wiggle a fraction of a millimeter when properly installed, more if they're not adjusted correctly. For most bikes, the wear caused by a properly adjusted integrated headset is going to be trivial. Something else on the frame will likely fail before the bore for the cartridge bearing gets wallowed out. Keep in mind that ...


2

In replacing a threaded headset on an older bike, there are two other considerations we need to make beyond selecting between ball bearings or needle bearings (though, IMO needle bearings are ideal for a number of reasons that I won't get into.) First, you need to measure the stack height. Stack height is the amount of space the headset takes up, not ...


2

If the locknut can't be tightened down without slipping, there will be no way to keep it tight. Hopefully the fork threads are ok and not damaged otherwise you're looking at a new fork. Also check to see that you're using at least 5 threads for the locknut - if the locknut is being tightened on only a couple of threads it's probably not going to hold and ...


1

Daniel is right. If you tighten the knurled ring by hand, but not quite as hard as it will go, then use a large spanner to tighten the locknut down against it, which will tighten the race slightly more, you won't need any sort of pliers (or, less likely to damage anything, a strap wrench). You might need to back off and try again a few times to get the load ...



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