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6

First off, understand that HR drops as you age, even if you stay in good physical shape. Older riders will tend to have a lower HR. In addition, HR drops as you become better conditioned to high-output activity. Basically, as you suggest, the capacity of the heart and circulatory system increases so that sufficient oxygenated blood can be delivered to the ...


6

The classic DIY method is the Conconi test which requires you to be able to measure your power output and your heart rate, slowly increasing your power over time. E.g. starting at a very low level, you increase your output by a set amount every minute until you can no longer do it. At each stage you take your average heart rate. Then when you have the data, ...


5

Just keep at it. The human body is very adaptable and you'll soon get fitter. Don't worry too much about food and nutrition at the moment, that only matters when you're cycling at a competitive level, you just need to make sure you've had breakfast before you ride in the morning. Regardless of cycling/weight loss you should try and eat a healthy balanced ...


5

I think on a bike it would be harder to reach max HR, but in running it is easy. Find a hill (say 1/2 KM long) that is reasonably steep. Warm up for 20 minutes of running, and start doing hill repeats. Aim for a pace where you can do about 6 repeats. Do the first three at increasing paces, and then for 4 and 5 start pushing to the max you can handle. As ...


5

I can't speak about HRM's that do not use a chest strap as that's the only type that I have used (other than to play with in the store). I find the ones with a chest strap to be completely hassle free, and I don't have to contort into a weird position to get a reading. I've had great luck with HRM's from Timex and Nashbar in the $50 range, and like Polar ...


3

The short annswer is not at all important. People trained and got fit for decades without heart rate monitors. Current thoughs in some camps is to dump heart rate altogether. For someone just wanting to get fit and loose some weight, heartrate monitoring is usually an interesting distraction. The drive for it comes down from pro level sports to trainers and ...


3

If you look for a cheap chest-strap HRM I can testify in favor of the Sigma PC15, which I used personally. See a review here. As for completely wristwatch HRM I never used them directly for the reason freiheit states in his comment and I wouldn't recommend them for cycling use.


3

There's a lot of confusion over the definitions of aerobic threshold, anaerobic threshold, lactate threshold and determining power levels or heart rates for each can be tricky. Some advocate working them out from a ramp test to exhaustion but that's stressful and probably unnecessary. Joe Friel determines "lactate threshold heart rate" by taking the average ...


3

As a rule of thumb you're right about the "220-minus-age" thing. I've found this to be pretty accurate over the last 3-4 years. Empirical way you say? Keep a moderate speed for a good while and then pace yourself until you're about to faint. That should give an accurate indication of your maximum HR :) I.e., the max HR is individual so you can only find ...


3

My commute is also ~15 miles. Certainly don't worry about that heart monitor (not for commuting at least). Try not to eat any processed flours (including bread!). My breakfast is whole oats soaked in milk with nuts, berries, and whatever else you fancy. For the ride home it's important to get that same carb boost before you ride home (I eat 300-400 calories ...


3

Source - Metabolic Factors Limiting Performance in Marathon Runners (While the above paper is aimed at marathon runners, I'm not aware of any reason it can't be applied to other endurance sports such as long-distance cycling.) Exercise is fuelled by a combination of fat (plasma free fatty acids plus muscle triglycerides) and carbohydrate (plasma glucose ...


3

I think you need more rest. It's easy to forget that you don't get fitter and stronger during exercise, but when your body recovers after exercise. I admire your motivation and the effort you're putting in, if you don't get enough rest in between exercise, it may actually take longer to get fit (and be more painful). By rest I mean whatever ordinary daily ...


3

Given the battery changes, if you haven't washed the strap, try doing that, first with soap and water, then wipe with isopropyl alcohol. If you get no different response, replace the strap. BTW, I recently had to replace my Edge 305 because the PC drivers were blue screening my Win 7 PC. If you use the Garmin software at all, you might consider an overall ...


2

Cycling is an aerobic sport and for any sustained effort you are limited by oxygen delivery and conversion. Meanwhile, heart rate is just a measurement of how fast your heart is beating -- the other missing component of oxygen delivery is "stroke volume"; and then you still have to get from the delivery system to power production. Stroke volume is determined ...


2

As others have pointed, heart-rate alone is not enough to organize a comprehensive training program, and some preliminary steps (fitness tests, mostly) are necessary so that you can properly train guided by heart rate zones. The main idea is the following: heart rate is one of the best measures of your physical effort. Each person have an individual maximum ...


2

I found driod support for these kinds of sensors to be patchy at best and not yet what I consider ready for prime time. Manufacturer provided software is often crap, third party often don't support the hardware. Many claims of features and devices suppported apply to the iPhone versions only. I current use Digifit iCardio on my driod phone with Scorche ...


2

I come to this question as (in chronological order) a speed skater, cyclist, and runner. I have been a full-time Data Whore since early 2007. I have used various Garmin devices and smartphones. What I have found works best is the device that is on your person, with a sufficiently charged battery, and actually recording data. I spent five years using a ...


1

It is not ANT+ - only the HR-11 is listed on "thisisant.com" (and its too old to be ANT+) I suspect it will analogue - most likely would be Polar compatible but cannot be certain. There are Cateye digital monitors, and also ANT+ monitors, the digital ones have "Digital" written on them, which is why I suspect analogue Best option (IMHO) would be to turf ...


1

I'd go smartphone based. Most of the apps have a free version to try out. The accuracy of most trackers whether phone based or not isn't great at a realistic price. Even then some effort may be needed in the tracking (changing load carried). If you're not talking about a training tracker but just to record calories burnt for a range of manually selected ...


1

I can't really give you an overview of the market, but I can list a couple of devices that I've got, or my wife has, to give you an idea of what is around. But I'll say straight off that this might be limited value to you. First there is the Garmin Edge. This is ideal for measuring cycling data - you have external sensors such as heart rate monitor, speed, ...


1

Are you at risk of a heart attack? If so it is probably useful. Seriously, I have a (mid-fifties) friend whose doctor advised him that everybody "over a certain age" should wear a HRM when they exercise. Also, there is a regime of training that is heart-rate-based. Clearly if you subscribe to this, then you will need a heart rate monitor to see how you're ...


1

Android can just about handle multiple BTLE sensors simultaneously but there are still some low level Android bugs that make it rather unreliable. The coding for is also a good bit more complex to get working than the single sensor case. I have support in my app IpBike via a beta version of IpSensorMan At this point in time if you were getting new then an ...


1

The short answer is "no", there are no charts or tables that can tell you this directly. There is a lot of variability that determines how hard a person can work out for a specific amount of time - a few of the factors include: Genetics Amount of training Type of training (if you train only for long periods, your ability to work hard at a high intensity ...


1

In addition to Google/books ("Total Heart Rate Training" by Joel Friel is a worthwhile read, IMO) have an Active Metabolic Rate test, VO2Max test, or something similar performed at a sports lab to measure exactly where your zones are. Don't waste time with "214-(age*0.8)" or other faith-based calculations.


1

especially during the winter/cold months static can be an issue (so I read when I was having the exact same problem)...so i sprayed my HR band with Static Cling and it was the first true reading I've seen since I got it over a month ago! Try it and see if it works...


1

It might not be the case here, as it states that problems have been for months, but last summer I had a similar problem, except that the belt was working perfectly. The problem was caused by overtraining and my body was not able to give more than 165 bpm at maximum effort. A few rest days solved the problem. After that I paid more attention to rest and food ...



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