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16

A lot depends on the rider and what you mean by efficiency. It is easy to keep a hub gear running well for years, but an unmaintained derailleur will become inefficient very quickly. A hub gear allows the chain to be fully enclosed, for all but the most dedicated cyclist; an enclosed chain will be more efficient as it will be cleaner and better oiled. An ...


11

It depends on the model you get, but the efficiency is generally comparable. Derailleurs that are in really good condition and properly lubed will be more efficient, but marginally, and will often be less efficient due to real world conditions. At least that's what the wiki says: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hub_gear I have one road bike with a 3x9 ...


11

If you're going to be respacing, I'd suggest an alternative method from sheldon's 2x4 method. Use a threaded rod with washers and nuts. It's far more controlled and easier to keep your frame aligned, plus you can keep it in the stand as you work. See here If you need to adjust the dropout alignment, you can adjust thusly


10

In 2001, Kyle and Berto published a comparison of the mechanical efficiency of several configurations of derailleur and internally-geared hubs in Human Power, which you can find here. Among the systems tested were a Shimano MTB derailleur system, a Sturmey-Archer 3-speed hub, the Shimano 7-speed Nexus hub, and the 14-speed Rohloff hub. MTB derailleur systems ...


9

For the bearings you do need the tools. The hub is advertised as a tool-free maintenance hub, but that's only for light work. Check this post out on bikeradar.com: I recently e-mailed DT-Swiss on this topic and here's the conversation - Me - "This one has been mentioned by a couple of people - you advertise a "No tool concept" and a "No tool ...


9

Benzo and Glenn Gervais are right on, but I thought I'd include a photo for any visual learners. This is a typical fixed/free, high flange rear hub. Quite often they're available in 120mm and 130mm OLD to fit different width dropouts. These hubs generally have solid axles without quick releases to prevent the hub from slipping and slackening your chain. ...


8

A spacer to convert an 8/9 speed freehub to 7 speed freehub goes behind the cassette, between the hub shell and the cassette. Most cassette lock rings will not bind on the spacer, they will go inside it if you place it on the outside. In addition, the aluminum used in most cassette spacers is too soft, and would compress under direct compression from the ...


8

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


7

This can be done two ways: Easy way: Purchase a new 700c wheel with coaster brake hub from your Local Bike Shop or the internet. It may be hard to find this as it is not a particularly popular option, but it's not uncommon to find one at a well-appointed bike shop. Hard way: Purchase a new coaster brake hub, and rebuild your existing rear wheel (or have it ...


7

This is a very subjective opinion. A standard like "change your oil every 3000 miles" doesn't exist as far as I know, although here is a suggested one. I ride about 3,000-4,000 miles a year and my rule of thumb is to do the hubs every 300 - 500 miles or so, and the bottom bracket twice a year. Works out to a hub overhaul about every other month. Both of ...


6

Looking at the spec of your bike it says the BB is a cartridge unit. This probably isn't serviceable -- it's designed to be replaced when worn out, so just keep riding it until it grinds or gets excessively sloppy. The hubs might be serviceable. If you ride a lot in nasty conditions, or you're aggressive with the degreaser you might want to service them. ...


6

The NuVinci system is fantastic in principle and one day all bikes might come with it, but we aren't there yet. As the system stands there are a few matters that might not make it the answer to your prayers of an easier time going up hills: For hilly terrain you need gears - it goes without saying. The steeper the hills the bigger range of gears - going up ...


6

Cone nuts have lock nuts. The lock nuts (in an ideal world) prevent any motion. And, as you observe, precession in either direction is bad on wheel bearings, so there's no real point in preferring self-tightening or self-loosening. (In fact, having both the same direction means that any slight "creep" in one will tend to be canceled by the "creep" in the ...


6

For a standard loose-bearing hub, to grease it you disassemble it, wash the components in solvent, and then reassemble with new grease. You may want to take this opportunity to replace the individual balls in the assembly. As to how often you may need to do this, it's a little bit of a wild guess. I aim for (very roughly) every 10K miles, but a lot ...


6

The best suggestion I can make is to read "The Art of Wheelbuilding, by Gerd Schraner". As for materials: Use aluminum, double walled rims. They are stronger, lighter, and believe it or not easier for a new wheel builder to get true and round than steel rims will be. In addition, steel rims for a road bike will be difficult to come by in new condition. ...


6

You likely tightened the cones too tight. Read up on the proper procedure for cone adjustment and be sure to grease it up well. http://sheldonbrown.com/cone-adjustment.html OR http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/hub-overhaul-and-adjustment


6

If you're saying that, off the body, the sprockets move slightly relative to each other, that's not a problem. The sprockets are only just "tacked" together so that they remain in the right order and orientation while off the body. The body provides the strength to hold them. If, on the other hand, you notice that the sprockets slide up and down the body ...


6

The chain looks a little bit too taut for what I use in my fixie. But I don't rely on my chain to stop the bike, as I am of the sissy kind that rides with brakes, so dropping the chain is not that bad of an issue, although it has never actually happened. But from your video, there basically does not seem to be any slack in the chain, I try go with 1-2 cm ...


6

You need a freewheel removal tool. That looks to me like it will take an FR6, but you should measure first if you're planning on buying. Although, this will likely be the only time you ever use it unless you open a bike shop. Your local bike shop will almost certainly have one of these and be able to whip it off it no time. They might not even charge for ...


6

First, try to find a modern wheel that's the right size. They are still made and you can get very shiny ones that will match the bike very nicely. Or get a 120mm fixie hub and add 3mm of spacers each side. If you must use a modern wheel, try to shrink your hub. Many hubs have washers between the locknuts and cones, or other spacers. If you can remove even a ...


5

Daniel summed up the first half of your question pretty well. For the second half, start by visiting this link to learn how to adjust the hub. When you go to inspect the bike try what you've learned first. If the shift lever is obviously sticky it may just need new cable and housing. Other than that, it's hard to tell. Internally geared hubs typically aren't ...


5

Phil Wood Hubs rarely have issues. If it is the pawls that are the problem, a rebuild kit will be enough. They are replaceable parts. They are the "teeth" that the freehub use to drive the hub shell (and the rest of your wheel) forward. Let them try a rebuild. You won't lose anything by it, and it will be faster than an RMA. But if you continue to have ...


5

If you have a singlespeed, you may already have a flip flop hub. A flip flop hub has threads on both sides of the wheel. Typically there is a side for a freewheel and a side for a fixed gear. Take a look at the rear hub opposite the freewheel and chain. The fixed gear side will have two tiers of threads, one larger diameter section for a fixed cog and a ...


5

It does appear a bit off. Looks like there is some extra resistance present somewhere in your drivetrain. Check your chain tension. If it's too tight, that could be adding resistance. You could also remove the chain from the fixed cog and spin the wheel to see if the resistance is coming from the hub.


5

If the notches are about 25 mm apart, this may be your baby: On the Park Tool website there are two very informative documents on freewheel removal, and destructive freewheel removal, which should answer all your questions.


5

Those counterlocked axle nuts are binding together more tightly than the threads are on each individual nut, and thus staying counterlocked against one another. Usually this isn't the case and when you put a wrench on the outside nut on either side of the hub, one of the outer nuts will break free. As you're seeing now, not always the case. You need a box ...


5

That looks fixable to me. What probably happened is the locknut was loose, and continued riding caused both cone and locknut to unscrew. It's a good job you've stopped riding that bike - riding on that hub now would cause significant damage. When a hub has a bit of play, the balls are free to move across parts of the cup and cone that aren't designed to ...


5

The first thing to note is "Does the 8 speed hub clear the dropouts ?" You may be able to spread the frame if steel. Since you're likely going from a 120mm to 130 mm (which is 2 sizes - 120->126->130), you should be cold setting it. The second question would be "Can the brakes reach the rim?" Unfortunately, to my knowledge, nobody makes a 5 speed ...


4

At 7 miles a day on road riding, assuming you have well sealed hubs and bottom brackets I would expect you to be able to go well over a year before having to grease and repack. A lot depends on the space you have and if you are happy to do the work your self – if you have a warm dry workshop then you may decide that doing maintenance more often is a good ...



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