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6

The GT Aggressor 2.0 2014 ships with a rear wheel which uses a freewheel, so if you want to go 9 speed, you need a rear wheel which has a Shimano-compatible cassette freehub as well as a 9 speed rear shifter which is Shimano compatible (and obviously a 9 speed cassette). Buying a new rear wheel will be likely cheaper and more reliable than having the ...


3

Probably you need to service that hub - or get it serviced by your LBS. That much drag means that either it's full of dirt, or the grease has completely dried up or water contaminated, or the bearings have collapsed. None of those are likely to be fatal, but you would be well advised to open that hub up and clean it out, check the bearings, and re-grease ...


2

The webpage for Chris King Hubs says they are easy to service. They supply lots of info sheets, like this hub exploded view, and manual. So I would take it apart and service it. They also sell parts, and since it's a high-end hub I would put some effort into saving it.


2

I wouldn't image it is normal for them to be over-tightened - what would be the point? However, its generally advised after buying a machine built bike / wheels to check that spokes / hubs haven't loosening after a breaking in period. This in in comparison with a hand built bike.


1

Ok, so it sounds like in this instance, the hubs were ridiculously overtightened. You should know that in general, you will get slightly overtightened hubs. A properly adjusted hub in a quick-release wheel will have no play when the wheel is in the frame, but very slight play when the wheel is off the frame. All the wheels I ever got were overtightened in ...


1

I worked in a bike shop around 1990 assembling new bikes. Adjusting the hubs was one of the steps we did. They were typically too tight from the factory. I never heard of missing balls, but I didn't look inside the hubs. It sounds like someone didn't do their job at the original shop and at wherever the hubs were made. We sold a lot of Giants, they were ...


1

BSOs (bicycle shaped objects) sold by department stores and discount bike retailers are often very poorly manufactured and assembled (both originally at the factory and then final assembly at the store). Missing bearings, overtightened cones, loose brakes, loose steering stems, loose pedals, loose quick releases, missing safety equipment, etc. are all par ...



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