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7

The GT Aggressor 2.0 2014 ships with a rear wheel which uses a freewheel, so if you want to go 9 speed, you need a rear wheel which has a Shimano-compatible cassette freehub as well as a 9 speed rear shifter which is Shimano compatible (and obviously a 9 speed cassette). Buying a new rear wheel will be likely cheaper and more reliable than having the ...


6

The first thing to note is "Does the 8 speed hub clear the dropouts ?" You may be able to spread the frame if steel. Since you're likely going from a 120mm to 130 mm (which is 2 sizes - 120->126->130), you should be cold setting it. The second question would be "Can the brakes reach the rim?" Unfortunately, to my knowledge, nobody makes a 5 speed ...


6

Unless you have a lathe the tolerances are going to be too high for you to be able to to do an acceptable job here. Plus, I believe that the cone is surface hardened, after you grind through that the underlying material will be too soft. If you visit your local bike shop they should be able to match it up.


5

There is supposed to be a locknut on the axle, as well as the cone. When adjusting the bearings it's important to get the locknut quite tight against the cone, so that the pair cannot rotate on the threaded axle. As you've found, if the cone can rotate then it will, from the rotation of the wheel. The left side will get looser (but will be somewhat ...


5

Each kind of grease will perform best at a certain temperature. And is designed for a certain speed of movement of the parts it is used at to reach and not exceed that temperature. So yes, it is worth it to use the special grease for bikes or get an other kind of grease that is designed for the speeds/temperature your parts will get. I found that when a ...


4

A bearing that is adjusted too tight can actually seize completely. This happened to me once. I overhauled my front hub and tightened the bearing cones too much. Result: a front wheel that plain stopped turning at some point. Too tight adjustment will exert more pressure on the cones and cups, and will probably wear out the bearings faster than too loose ...


4

By accident I think I came across some valuable information. http://www.notubes.com/help/troubleshooting.aspx Why is my cassette digging into my freehub body? Stan's freehubs are made lightweight using aluminum like many other brands. It is necessary to make the lockring extra tight to avoid significant wear on the freehub. We recommend using ...


4

I don't believe there is a lot that can be done as this has to due with the material selection for the freehub body shell (soft aluminum). Below is an image of a Velocity hub (on my commute bike) that had the same problem. I actually had to hammer the cassette off of the hub body. In this case a Tiagra cassette (where most of the cogs are pinned together) ...


4

If the cones were too tight, the hub would have died a long time ago. Based on what you're describing, the grease is definitely contaminated and most likely the cones are pitted to some degree. Cups tend to be more durable than cones, but there's no guarantee that they won't be pitted too. You'll find out for sure when you disassemble it. A proper overhaul ...


4

Shimano/SRAM 11 speed cassettes are wider than 8/9/10 speed ones. So yes, you need a new, wider freehub body, unless your old one was not very old and used a spacer to fit a 10-speed cassette. People with non-Shimano brand hubs are less likely to find replacement freehub bodies, it seems, leading to replacement of the whole hub, or even the whole wheel if ...


4

Campagnolo wheels are available with both Shimano/SRAM and Campagnolo cassette compatible freewheel bodies. Ask which cassette your friend has and if they have Campagnolo, you can get the correct freehub body as a spare part. SRAM/Shimano and Campagnolo cassettes have slightly different cog spacing. You can mix them, but the derailleur adjustment will be ...


3

As you're not clear on road vs mtb, there's two answers. For 11 spd road drivetrains Shimano uses a 1.85mm wider hub with the drive side flange closer to the centerline to compensate for the additional width. Using a spacer allows the wheel to be backwards compatible to fit a 10 spd cassette. You can't fit a 11spd freehub in place of a 10spd freehub unless ...


3

Probably you need to service that hub - or get it serviced by your LBS. That much drag means that either it's full of dirt, or the grease has completely dried up or water contaminated, or the bearings have collapsed. None of those are likely to be fatal, but you would be well advised to open that hub up and clean it out, check the bearings, and re-grease ...


3

I've seen this issue in the past and the culprit was the axle (not the skewer) in the hub had snapped. Fortunately, the bike was still rideable to a certain extent, as the QR skewer was holding the two broken sections of axle in place. Note that even when the wheel was removed from the frame, it still wasn't immediately obvious that the axle had snapped, ...


3

The bike is made by Univega and probably has a freewheel. If the pedaling motion still works, I'd guess your freewheel is shot (the thing that the gears are on in the back). You have to remove it with a freewheel remover and put on a new one. This requires a freewheel remover tool and a large wrench or vise, so you might want to take it to a shop and let ...


3

Sounds to me like classic symptoms of a dirty drivetrain. If your chain is getting slack on top when you stop pedalling or backpedal, then the problem is in your freehub (or freewheel, whichever you have), a dirty freehub will cause all the problems you've listed, even on a brand new bike. When dirt and grit mixed with excess chain oil get gummed up in the ...


3

Use the Rivolta grease and you will be fine. Most important is that it is dense enough, will last over time, stays fluid in low temperature and that it is somewhat water resistance. According to the pdf, the Rivolta will do all those things very good.


3

I would recommend doing two things: Reassemble the hub with the thickest grease you can find (within reason). It might slow you down a little, but it will help the bearings last as long as possible. Make a mark on the back side of the cone that corresponds to where the damage is. When you're putting the wheel on, rotate the axle so that the damaged side of ...


3

Most lower end hubs do not come perfectly adjusted from the factory. A quality LBS will have a step in a bike build process that checks and/or adjusts the hubs accordingly. It can be hard to adjust a hub that is unbuilt and between that and machine assembly, they are often close, but not as good as they can be. If you are feeling vibration, I would ...


2

If it screws on then it is a freewheel not a cassette. They are not the same. There is a link in my comment. Your spacer kit with one sprocket was probably for cassette / freehub. It is not going to work. I suspect you can find a freewheel single speed conversion. You need a single speed freewheel - not a sprocket and a lockring.


2

Details found here: http://productinfo.shimano.com/specifications.html Spoke Hole P.C.D. Left/Right (mm) 45 Flange distance (mm) 57.9 Dish (mm) 8.4 Based on these figures, I would calculate the following values for your chosen Spoke Length Calculator: Centreline to Left flange: 37.35mm Centreline to Right flange: 20.55 Spoke hole diameter is not given. ...


2

The webpage for Chris King Hubs says they are easy to service. They supply lots of info sheets, like this hub exploded view, and manual. So I would take it apart and service it. They also sell parts, and since it's a high-end hub I would put some effort into saving it.


2

No it would not work. The pitt didn't form just because it was on the bottom, the pitt formed either because the cone came loose, or an abrasive got into the bearings. There's an equal amount of force being applied to the top of the cone as there is to the bottom when your hubs are properly adjusted. Think of the components in a hub as a stack, the cup is ...


2

The tools are relatively expensive compared to cone wrenches, but all cartridge bearings can be replaced if needed. http://www.enduroforkseals.com/id176.html You need both a puller and a press of some kind. Cartridge bearings last a very long time with no maintenance at all. Since installing fancy ceramic bearings is part of high end road cycling ...


2

I wouldn't image it is normal for them to be over-tightened - what would be the point? However, its generally advised after buying a machine built bike / wheels to check that spokes / hubs haven't loosening after a breaking in period. This in in comparison with a hand built bike.


2

"Ball bearings depend on the continuous presence of a very thin -millionths of an inch - film of lubricant between balls and races, and between the cage, bearing rings, and balls." Pitting happen very often when user over-tighten the hub, or forget to re-adjust the hub between winter/summer (depends on where you live, in Scotland I need to give a proper ...


2

It looks like the washer in your photo may be a "Wedge-Lock" washer like those available here: http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-washers/=xhptlp They appear to sell under the names "Heico-Lock" & "Nord-Lock". This may be a UK source: http://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/fasteners-fixings/nuts-washers/locking-anti-vibration-washers/ I should note that there ...


1

I worked in a bike shop around 1990 assembling new bikes. Adjusting the hubs was one of the steps we did. They were typically too tight from the factory. I never heard of missing balls, but I didn't look inside the hubs. It sounds like someone didn't do their job at the original shop and at wherever the hubs were made. We sold a lot of Giants, they were ...


1

BSOs (bicycle shaped objects) sold by department stores and discount bike retailers are often very poorly manufactured and assembled (both originally at the factory and then final assembly at the store). Missing bearings, overtightened cones, loose brakes, loose steering stems, loose pedals, loose quick releases, missing safety equipment, etc. are all par ...


1

Many trailers for Vehicles / ATVS use an "open bearing" design. This enables a person to do maintenance on them without completely replacing them out. This is cost effective at this size / scale but when it comes to a bicycle... I would highly suggest you stick with sealed bearings.



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