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6

You need a freewheel removal tool. That looks to me like it will take an FR6, but you should measure first if you're planning on buying. Although, this will likely be the only time you ever use it unless you open a bike shop. Your local bike shop will almost certainly have one of these and be able to whip it off it no time. They might not even charge for ...


4

Place a single leading spoke and a single trailing spoke- both on the same side of the hub- to get your placement correct. That way you only have to unthread two spokes if you're off. Once you've got it right, unthread the leading spoke if you're planning on lacing trailing first or vice versa and proceed as normal with lacing.


4

Those counterlocked axle nuts are binding together more tightly than the threads are on each individual nut, and thus staying counterlocked against one another. Usually this isn't the case and when you put a wrench on the outside nut on either side of the hub, one of the outer nuts will break free. As you're seeing now, not always the case. You need a box ...


4

Getting a 7-speed (or indeed any) Campy cassette wouldn't do you much good anyway since the rest of your drivetrain will be Shimano. As you've discovered the two don't mix. (Or rather, they are not supposed to mix and you can expect problems if you do try to mix them. Never say never, I guess!) I reckon your cheapest option could be to visit your LBS and to ...


4

Phil Wood freehubs come apart with a pair of 5mm hex wrenches. Insert into the axle ands and twist. There are four pawls in the cassette body that engage the steel ratchet ring wedged into the aluminum hub shell. A single spring is coiled around the four pawls. A rebuild kit will replace the pawls and spring. It will not replace the ratchet ring. If ...


3

Yes, I would suspect they are just fine. These are relatively inexpensive when new, and require little maintenance if broken down and lubed once in a while. What really matters in cyclocross is the number of spoke holes and flange geometry of the hub. I just did a quick google and found FH-2200 hubs have beefy flanges and 36 spoke holes. I was not able to ...


3

It is rare for a bike bearing to suddenly seize. Even a bearing "run dry" or exposed to saltwater or whatever will generally just get rough and squeaky. In order to seize you generally have one of two things: (Rare) A fragment of something -- sand, a sliver of metal, etc -- gets in between the balls in the bearing, causing them to lock. (Common) The ...


3

Any time you change your tire it's a good opportunity to check the condition of your cones and bearings. What sometimes happens is that the cones or retention nuts are starting to loosen, but the compression of the mounting nuts or quick release skewer holds everything together tight enough that you don't notice. After changing the tire, you may install it ...


3

Yes, the weight of you + your bike + your load should be a factor. At 200 + 28 + 30 lbs, your looking at close to 300 lbs. Consider 32h in the front and 36h in the rear. For 32mm tires, look for rims that are 15-19mm wide inside, and for 35mm tires look for 17-21 mm wide. I'm the same weight and have chosen 32h/36h but ride 38mm tires both front and back ...


3

Its likely disassembles in one of two ways: two cone wrenches (one on each side of the hub) to remove the jam nuts. This is the likely option. From your photo it looks like there is a flat spot on the jam nut. two hex wrenches (one on each side of the hub) that fit into the axle end. Two videos demonstrating these techniques: http://aol.it/15nYDub ...


2

The part you've circled is called the axle, even if it is not solid, and if it's bent you need to replace the axle, or the hub, or the whole wheel, whatever is cheapest. It can likely cause minor damage to your fork, but more importantly, if it's bent then it can fail- potentially in a catastrophic manner. Get it fixed, cheap insurance.


2

According to this Shimano TechDoc, the axle of HB-M475 (Front hub, 100mm OLD, 6-bolt disc mount) is M10. If you find a different model number marked on the hub, Shimano techdocs are listed here.


2

Bearings and races are made of very hard steel. So long as they are properly maintained (lubricated and adjusted to the correct tightness; visit Free Ride in Pittsburgh for help lubing/adjusting your bike if it's feeling worn and you don't want to pay a shop to do it for you), they should hold up with no problem. More info: ...


2

20mm hubs have an axle width of 110mm whereas a 15mm thru axle is 100mm. This means that there is no backwards compatibility on the hub unless it was already designed that way (such as Hope 2 hubs). The M810 is simply too wide. You would need to replace the front hub at least to run a 15mm TA fork.


2

Simplest 'good' solution is probably getting a conversion cassette - campagnolo spacing but with a shimano spline so it'll fit on your existing hub. This one from ambrosio would probably do the trick - http://www.probikekit.com.au/bicycle-cassettes-sprockets/ambrosio-cassette-shimano-fit-for-campagnolo-10-speed/10768425.html Things will probably be harder ...


2

I haven't found any campy replacement freehub for a deore... esp since shimano uses different incompatible freehub bodies for its different hubs, and Deore being a mountain group, campy being mostly road, I don't see there being any market for such a conversion. That being said, if you find a replacement campy rear hub with a similar flange size, you could ...


1

This Shimano tech doc has the relevant part numbers for you. Y3CZ98040, I think. You may want just part of it though. It also has a handy interchangeability table, that tells me a freehub body from an M985 or M775 would work too, but might be the wrong colour. You can look up more here.


1

I've not done this, but I beleive the threads are compatible with a standard fixed gear cog. If so, just buy a cog and install it. Then put a lockring from an adjustable bottom bracket on as a lockring (it has the same threads as the hub). Note that this will not works as well as a proper fixie hub, most obviously because it's missing the left hand ...


1

There are many sites on the web for calculating spoke lengths. Some of them have pre-filled settings for hubs and wheels, http://leonard.io/edd/ others ask for exact dimensions. The old adage of measure twice and cut once applies here so I would say go for at least 3 sites and check that they tally up! Not forgetting Sheldon Brown's page, ...


1

If your hub is in good condition & you wish to keep it having the wheel rebuilt is the way to go. However if your shop is trying to charge you more then 100$ish dollars for a rebuild, especially on an older hub perhaps consider doing the rebuild yourself. Re/building wheels is not a particularly difficult task with a wheel stand & proper tools all of ...


1

The cartridge bearings in the freehub body were worn. Actually, only the one nearest the hub body was jammed. I've obtained replacements and all is well again. It was a relatively simple (though noisy) job to bash them out with an old screwdriver (remember to remove circlips first - a circlip tool came in handy).


1

I'm not sure whether there are any challenges specific to a dahon bike, but here's a summary of the challenges you'll face converting any derailleur style bike to an internal gear hub: Hub width - You'll need to find an internal gear hub with the same width as the spacing between the dropouts. Chain tensioning - Derailleurs provide chain tensioning and ...


1

There's two general types of wheel bearings: cup and cone and sealed cartridge bearings. Cup and code bearings were very common years ago and are even still used on some high end Shimano hubs (dura-ace). http://sheldonbrown.com/cone-adjustment.html. These bearings are easily replaceable with minimal tools. If you have these bearings and have worn them down ...


1

This kind of pitting on the hub cone is usually because there was some small amount of play in the hub. Play allows sideways movement, which acts like a hammer on the ball bearings as the hub vibrates from being ridden, or hitting bumps on the road. The other side is normal, with the bearing track. If anything, the extra large compression track in that ...


1

Fantastic ! Building a fixed gear conversion is a lot of fun. tommy_o gives a great list of all the parts that go on a conversion, but when I try to imagine what it's like to have an old bike that you want to hack on, I think it's helpful to imagine what you'll have to change about your bike, so I'll give that a shot. As long as the existing bike is in ...


1

The cog and/or freewheel will not come with the hub unless it explicitly states it (it is not typical to come with it, as rear cogs come in different tooth count and width) To make this easier, these are all the parts required for a fixed gear bicycle with a threaded headset: Frame Fork Headset Stem Handlebars Bar Tape or Grips, Depending Brake Levers ...


1

I'm not 100% certain how the DT Swiss centerlock works but it seems like its a way to attach a 6 bolt brake rotor to their hub. What may have happened is that since your center lock was lose: it allowed the rotor to work against the 6 posts on the adapter causing some wear it allowed the adapter to work against the hub, also causing some wear. I'm not ...


1

Read this. The QR skewer when done up increases the bearing pre-load. Correct bearing adjustment requires a slight wobble when the wheel is off the bike, which stops when the wheel is installed and the QR Skewer done up. Its a bit of trial an error getting it right for the first few times.. It may also be incorrect bearing size - are you sure you used ...


1

Shimano R085, 8/9 speed, 36H $100 QBike.com 2595 N. Federal Highway , Fort Lauderdale, FL 33305 800-390-2122 http://store.qbike.com/shimano-hub-rear-fh-r085-36-cl-8-9s-black-bulk.html this is the only thing i've been able to find. been searching since new years 2013.



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