Hot answers tagged

6

Yes - one or two torque arms will help. Otherwise all the impulse is being send through your dropouts, which will be steel and will flex. This undoes the wheel nuts over time. This also fretts out the dropouts whih will cost you a new fork. Do you have anti-rotation washers in the fork dropouts too? Even my 250W motor needed them. More info: From ...


6

Unless you have a lathe the tolerances are going to be too high for you to be able to to do an acceptable job here. Plus, I believe that the cone is surface hardened, after you grind through that the underlying material will be too soft. If you visit your local bike shop they should be able to match it up.


6

Each kind of grease will perform best at a certain temperature. And is designed for a certain speed of movement of the parts it is used at to reach and not exceed that temperature. So yes, it is worth it to use the special grease for bikes or get an other kind of grease that is designed for the speeds/temperature your parts will get. I found that when a ...


6

I would recommend doing two things: Reassemble the hub with the thickest grease you can find (within reason). It might slow you down a little, but it will help the bearings last as long as possible. Make a mark on the back side of the cone that corresponds to where the damage is. When you're putting the wheel on, rotate the axle so that the damaged side of ...


6

That's a freehub body. Look on the hub for the model of hub you have, and then you can use that to find the appropriate freehub body model by looking at the documentation of the hub.


5

With a trapped axle like that you use a hammer, ideally a soft face one or I use a bit of wood as a pad. Hold the block against the axle, tap the block with a hammer. Holding the wheel in your hand rather than blocking it against a solid surface also reduces the impact. You will still probably damage the bearings, so preferably don't do this until you have ...


5

Summary: buying just the dust-cap is unlikely, normally you buy new cones and often a new axle, but that's because new cones are cheap. You'd only buy a new hub if something else is damaged (rare). You won't be able to fit sealed bearings. I the picture below from the Park site is the bearing cone and cap. I assume that's the cap you're talking about? ...


4

A bearing that is adjusted too tight can actually seize completely. This happened to me once. I overhauled my front hub and tightened the bearing cones too much. Result: a front wheel that plain stopped turning at some point. Too tight adjustment will exert more pressure on the cones and cups, and will probably wear out the bearings faster than too loose ...


4

Campagnolo wheels are available with both Shimano/SRAM and Campagnolo cassette compatible freewheel bodies. Ask which cassette your friend has and if they have Campagnolo, you can get the correct freehub body as a spare part. SRAM/Shimano and Campagnolo cassettes have slightly different cog spacing. You can mix them, but the derailleur adjustment will be ...


4

Here's a guide for overhauling a cup-and-cone low-end Shimano dynamo: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/34057344/Overhauling_Shimano_Dynamo_Hubs.pdf The main caution from that article concerns the connector-side cone & nut and the aluminum wire underneath them: Using your finger to prevent the plug assembly from turning, break the lock nut from ...


4

Most lower end hubs do not come perfectly adjusted from the factory. A quality LBS will have a step in a bike build process that checks and/or adjusts the hubs accordingly. It can be hard to adjust a hub that is unbuilt and between that and machine assembly, they are often close, but not as good as they can be. If you are feeling vibration, I would ...


4

The width, from locknut to locknut.


4

I've used the hammer method on my goldtec hubs back when I was a push bike courier in London. Reckon my rear hub did something like 80,000 miles in 6 years, changed bearings twice... I was definitely what you'd call a bush mechanic....but think hammer method is fine.


4

When you have a threaded cog, its designed to tighten when you pedal forward due to the threading direction. So, it doesn't come loose. When you skid stop or stop by resisting the pedals on a fixie, you apply torque the opposite way on the cog loosening it. The lockring is supposed to prevent this by its threading. But if the lockring is loose, all bets ...


3

Put your shifter in 4th gear. Adjust the cable tension so that the yellow lines match. There really isn't more to it. Not much to do wrong. If you can then shift all the way up to 8 and down to 1, the basic installation is correct. However ... from my experience, these hubs change a little over time. Mine (Alfine 8, basically the same thing) shows slippage ...


3

"Ball bearings depend on the continuous presence of a very thin -millionths of an inch - film of lubricant between balls and races, and between the cage, bearing rings, and balls." Pitting happen very often when user over-tighten the hub, or forget to re-adjust the hub between winter/summer (depends on where you live, in Scotland I need to give a proper ...


3

There aren't many repair or maintenance parts on a Shimano dynamo hub. At best, you can replace the sealed bearings (on the units that have them) or adjust the cones on the ones that don't. The most likely failure mode in your case is that either the 1) main electrical leads have oxidized; 2) or an internal wire has broken. My guess is that since your ...


2

In your update, you note that rather than absolute failure, you have varying light intensity on bumpy roads. This could be for two reasons: This is normal dynamo behavior at low speeds. Basically until you reach a minimum speed (around 10-15km/h), your dynamo power will vary with your speed. Hitting a bump often means a sharp increase or decrease in hub ...


2

If you want to make a very large flange hub (to produce shorter spoke lengths and produce a stiffer wheel), bonding a large metal flange to a carbon hub shell is not a bad idea. If you try doing it with a one piece design, the larger shell (coming from the larger flange) would likely make the hub heavy. Making the shell out of carbon instead has the the ...


2

Which hubs are you thinking about? It would be very hard to make a carbon hub flange strong enough to withstand spoke tension, assuming you are building a wheel with conventional spokes. Most carbon hubs I have seen use aluminum flanges, and the few which offer significant weight savings are ultralight equipment not for general use. Carbon probably won't ...


2

It looks like the washer in your photo may be a "Wedge-Lock" washer like those available here: http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-washers/=xhptlp They appear to sell under the names "Heico-Lock" & "Nord-Lock". This may be a UK source: http://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/fasteners-fixings/nuts-washers/locking-anti-vibration-washers/ I should note that there ...


2

Road front hubs are 100 mm and 8-10 speed rear hubs are 130 mm. In the case of the Trek 1.1, it's always been spec'd with a 8 speed rear hub, so those wheels should fit on the bike.


2

If the cones were over tightened you would likely feel two distinct notched, one finer one caused by over tightening the bearing cone and a coarser notch caused by the magnet/coil interaction. Because you only described one type of notch I would hazard a guess that it is the magnet/coil interaction, which is normal.


2

The feeling of notches is just the resistance you feel from moving the magnets past the coils in the hub. That's what generates the power. The hub is fine! When you actually ride the bike you won't feel a thing. Well, at least I don't feel anything. Some people have said they feel vibrations from their dynamo hub at lower speeds.


1

No, this sounds like way too much play, even though the lock-ring is tight it could be tightening up against the freehub and not the cassette. If you can wiggle the sprockets apart a bit, or slide them along the freehub then the cassette is not being held properly by the lockring. Then you just need to add some spacers. Shimano lock-rings should "click" ...


1

There is no way to minimize damage. With all due respect to BSOrider, the assembly rotates so no matter what position the damaged portion is, it will have an affect on the bearings and races. Pitted cones, races, and bearings need to be replaced period. Old Raleigh 3 speeds are quite ubiquitous so some LBS is likely to have them. That having been said, ...


1

Shimano Alfine hubs have a specific requirements for axle nut tightening. First, grease the axle nuts! Because the nuts are domed, they can accumulate grit inside them, and hold less securely over time. Secondly, the nuts have a minimum torque range of 30 ft/lbs. This is important, since if they are too loose, the non-turn washers can move and dig into your ...


1

I was all set to return the Alfine hub to the manufacturer and when I went to take it off I realised the wheel nuts were loose. Tightening the nuts solved the problem. It seems the hub not being fixed in place was causing it to be moved in the wrong direction and shifting to the lowest gear was pulling the mechanism too far inside the hub.


1

I would like to add some things to the above answers. If the hub is of the quick-release (QR) type (some are not), then the bearings adjustment will become tighter when the QR skewer is tightened. Therefore, some sources recommend that there should be a small play in the bearings before the wheel is put in place (see for instance ...


1

To quote the page you linked, "Since the Velosteel hub has standard track threads, it can run any fixie/track cog built to Phil Wood/Campagnolo standards." For cogs, this is the same standard as every other cog, but the lock ring will probably be different. Just take the cog from your old hub and keep the lock ring from new one. Note that this is different ...



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