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6

First, try to find a modern wheel that's the right size. They are still made and you can get very shiny ones that will match the bike very nicely. Or get a 120mm fixie hub and add 3mm of spacers each side. If you must use a modern wheel, try to shrink your hub. Many hubs have washers between the locknuts and cones, or other spacers. If you can remove even a ...


4

Place a single leading spoke and a single trailing spoke- both on the same side of the hub- to get your placement correct. That way you only have to unthread two spokes if you're off. Once you've got it right, unthread the leading spoke if you're planning on lacing trailing first or vice versa and proceed as normal with lacing.


4

Those counterlocked axle nuts are binding together more tightly than the threads are on each individual nut, and thus staying counterlocked against one another. Usually this isn't the case and when you put a wrench on the outside nut on either side of the hub, one of the outer nuts will break free. As you're seeing now, not always the case. You need a box ...


4

Its likely disassembles in one of two ways: two cone wrenches (one on each side of the hub) to remove the jam nuts. This is the likely option. From your photo it looks like there is a flat spot on the jam nut. two hex wrenches (one on each side of the hub) that fit into the axle end. Two videos demonstrating these techniques: http://aol.it/15nYDub ...


4

Phil Wood freehubs come apart with a pair of 5mm hex wrenches. Insert into the axle ands and twist. There are four pawls in the cassette body that engage the steel ratchet ring wedged into the aluminum hub shell. A single spring is coiled around the four pawls. A rebuild kit will replace the pawls and spring. It will not replace the ratchet ring. If ...


4

You may want to just open them open to take a peek to make sure that: 1) they are actually packed with grease to begin with and 2) that all of the bearings are actually there. With cheap hubs, missing grease and missing bearings are not unheard of. But if a quick peek yields lots of grease and a full set of bearings, I'd tighten up the cones and pedal away. ...


3

No. Single speed freehubs have totally different spacing so you have a less dished wheel. You'll have to use spacers.


3

It is rare for a bike bearing to suddenly seize. Even a bearing "run dry" or exposed to saltwater or whatever will generally just get rough and squeaky. In order to seize you generally have one of two things: (Rare) A fragment of something -- sand, a sliver of metal, etc -- gets in between the balls in the bearing, causing them to lock. (Common) The ...


3

Yes, I would suspect they are just fine. These are relatively inexpensive when new, and require little maintenance if broken down and lubed once in a while. What really matters in cyclocross is the number of spoke holes and flange geometry of the hub. I just did a quick google and found FH-2200 hubs have beefy flanges and 36 spoke holes. I was not able to ...


3

Any time you change your tire it's a good opportunity to check the condition of your cones and bearings. What sometimes happens is that the cones or retention nuts are starting to loosen, but the compression of the mounting nuts or quick release skewer holds everything together tight enough that you don't notice. After changing the tire, you may install it ...


3

I had a 2008 version of the 1.5 bike and the rear wheel took a 15mm cone wrench. It's possible that Trek changed this, but I think 15mm is a good bet. I agree with @alex; anything other than 13, 15, or 17 would be considered uncommon.


3

Try carefully using an adjustable pin spanner, or the Park variant. If not, I believe current Mavic hubs use the same pin pattern, so the plastic tools that come with Mavic wheelsets is plentiful and may be strong enough for your use.


3

I don't necessarily recommend it, but I own a Vitus 979 and did this about 10 years ago so I could upgrade to a 9 speed cassette and STI shifters. I haven't had any problems with it. But I haven't put a lot of miles on it since the change and I'm under 150 lbs. Some of those miles have been on dirt roads. I stripped the frame about a year ago and the ...


2

Time traveling here... If that type of spalling occurs after several thousand miles, then that's most likely normal wear from the little bit of play vs road vibration, etc. If that occurs within 200 miles, then it means your cone nuts are too tight. Some people here say there should be no play, but that is incorrect. There should be a tiny bit of play in ...


2

The part you've circled is called the axle, even if it is not solid, and if it's bent you need to replace the axle, or the hub, or the whole wheel, whatever is cheapest. It can likely cause minor damage to your fork, but more importantly, if it's bent then it can fail- potentially in a catastrophic manner. Get it fixed, cheap insurance.


2

According to this Shimano TechDoc, the axle of HB-M475 (Front hub, 100mm OLD, 6-bolt disc mount) is M10. If you find a different model number marked on the hub, Shimano techdocs are listed here.


2

20mm hubs have an axle width of 110mm whereas a 15mm thru axle is 100mm. This means that there is no backwards compatibility on the hub unless it was already designed that way (such as Hope 2 hubs). The M810 is simply too wide. You would need to replace the front hub at least to run a 15mm TA fork.


2

Simplest 'good' solution is probably getting a conversion cassette - campagnolo spacing but with a shimano spline so it'll fit on your existing hub. This one from ambrosio would probably do the trick - http://www.probikekit.com.au/bicycle-cassettes-sprockets/ambrosio-cassette-shimano-fit-for-campagnolo-10-speed/10768425.html Things will probably be harder ...


2

I haven't found any campy replacement freehub for a deore... esp since shimano uses different incompatible freehub bodies for its different hubs, and Deore being a mountain group, campy being mostly road, I don't see there being any market for such a conversion. That being said, if you find a replacement campy rear hub with a similar flange size, you could ...


2

Bearings and races are made of very hard steel. So long as they are properly maintained (lubricated and adjusted to the correct tightness; visit Free Ride in Pittsburgh for help lubing/adjusting your bike if it's feeling worn and you don't want to pay a shop to do it for you), they should hold up with no problem. More info: ...


2

Sheldon Brown to the rescue: "Shimano uses the trademark "Hyperglide-C" to designate a system with an 11 tooth sprocket. The "C" stands for "compact". These systems are used with smaller-than-usual chainwheel sizes, or on bicycles that have a small drive wheel, or to achieve higher gears. Due to clearance problems, the cutaway between the splines on ...


2

The simple answer is yes, you can add washers to the axle and shove it in. If you put all the washers on the chain side the disk brake will still work without modification, at the expense of a crappy chain line (assuming you have derailleur gears - with a singlespeed you'll probably have to change the BB or you'll often drop the chain). Or you can space both ...


2

I have figured out two options: The less elegant option is just putting some washers on the end of your axle. You have to fiddle with the washers every time you take off your wheel, but they will do the job. If you want to avoid that, you have to put them inside the locknut. If your wheel is such that the bottom of the locknut is outside of your cassette ...


2

You likely need to tighten the hub bearings. I'd take it to a shop and ask for a hub bearing adjustment. On most hubs I'd say you can do it yourself but the Nexus series are complicated and have different features depending on the model. This means most step-by-step directions for standard hubs won't apply. E.g. it may have a brake built into it. ...


2

super-reliable not too heavy low maintenance not super expensive Any Shimano XT hub M76X - M77X. Also confider the newer T7XX "touring XT" models. Shimano hubs are exclusively (afaik) loose-bearing rather than cartridge hubs, so they're easily serviceable and the balls are available almost everywhere. The XT range should also have decent seals, durable ...


1

Many mountain bikes used cup and cone hubs, and all of Shimano's mountain hubs still use cup and cone, so I would say you're fine. Usually the spokes are the first thing to start breaking.


1

This Shimano tech doc has the relevant part numbers for you. Y3CZ98040, I think. You may want just part of it though. It also has a handy interchangeability table, that tells me a freehub body from an M985 or M775 would work too, but might be the wrong colour. You can look up more here.


1

I've not done this, but I beleive the threads are compatible with a standard fixed gear cog. If so, just buy a cog and install it. Then put a lockring from an adjustable bottom bracket on as a lockring (it has the same threads as the hub). Note that this will not works as well as a proper fixie hub, most obviously because it's missing the left hand ...


1

I'm not sure whether there are any challenges specific to a dahon bike, but here's a summary of the challenges you'll face converting any derailleur style bike to an internal gear hub: Hub width - You'll need to find an internal gear hub with the same width as the spacing between the dropouts. Chain tensioning - Derailleurs provide chain tensioning and ...


1

You can just spring in the dropouts. Its only 3mm on each side, a steel frame will easily bend that much. Just put the wheel in place, then tighten up the nuts on each side.



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