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7

The GT Aggressor 2.0 2014 ships with a rear wheel which uses a freewheel, so if you want to go 9 speed, you need a rear wheel which has a Shimano-compatible cassette freehub as well as a 9 speed rear shifter which is Shimano compatible (and obviously a 9 speed cassette). Buying a new rear wheel will be likely cheaper and more reliable than having the ...


6

First, try to find a modern wheel that's the right size. They are still made and you can get very shiny ones that will match the bike very nicely. Or get a 120mm fixie hub and add 3mm of spacers each side. If you must use a modern wheel, try to shrink your hub. Many hubs have washers between the locknuts and cones, or other spacers. If you can remove even a ...


6

The first thing to note is "Does the 8 speed hub clear the dropouts ?" You may be able to spread the frame if steel. Since you're likely going from a 120mm to 130 mm (which is 2 sizes - 120->126->130), you should be cold setting it. The second question would be "Can the brakes reach the rim?" Unfortunately, to my knowledge, nobody makes a 5 speed ...


5

That looks fixable to me. What probably happened is the locknut was loose, and continued riding caused both cone and locknut to unscrew. It's a good job you've stopped riding that bike - riding on that hub now would cause significant damage. When a hub has a bit of play, the balls are free to move across parts of the cup and cone that aren't designed to ...


5

There is supposed to be a locknut on the axle, as well as the cone. When adjusting the bearings it's important to get the locknut quite tight against the cone, so that the pair cannot rotate on the threaded axle. As you've found, if the cone can rotate then it will, from the rotation of the wheel. The left side will get looser (but will be somewhat ...


4

Phil Wood freehubs come apart with a pair of 5mm hex wrenches. Insert into the axle ands and twist. There are four pawls in the cassette body that engage the steel ratchet ring wedged into the aluminum hub shell. A single spring is coiled around the four pawls. A rebuild kit will replace the pawls and spring. It will not replace the ratchet ring. If ...


4

You may want to just open them open to take a peek to make sure that: 1) they are actually packed with grease to begin with and 2) that all of the bearings are actually there. With cheap hubs, missing grease and missing bearings are not unheard of. But if a quick peek yields lots of grease and a full set of bearings, I'd tighten up the cones and pedal away. ...


4

By accident I think I came across some valuable information. http://www.notubes.com/help/troubleshooting.aspx Why is my cassette digging into my freehub body? Stan's freehubs are made lightweight using aluminum like many other brands. It is necessary to make the lockring extra tight to avoid significant wear on the freehub. We recommend using ...


4

I don't believe there is a lot that can be done as this has to due with the material selection for the freehub body shell (soft aluminum). Below is an image of a Velocity hub (on my commute bike) that had the same problem. I actually had to hammer the cassette off of the hub body. In this case a Tiagra cassette (where most of the cogs are pinned together) ...


4

If the cones were too tight, the hub would have died a long time ago. Based on what you're describing, the grease is definitely contaminated and most likely the cones are pitted to some degree. Cups tend to be more durable than cones, but there's no guarantee that they won't be pitted too. You'll find out for sure when you disassemble it. A proper overhaul ...


4

Shimano/SRAM 11 speed cassettes are wider than 8/9/10 speed ones. So yes, you need a new, wider freehub body, unless your old one was not very old and used a spacer to fit a 10-speed cassette. People with non-Shimano brand hubs are less likely to find replacement freehub bodies, it seems, leading to replacement of the whole hub, or even the whole wheel if ...


3

In almost all cases when servicing a hub the bearing DO need to be replaced. You may not be able to see it without the aid of a microscope, but the bearings will be slightly pitted after any appreciable period of use. As one user points out, high grade ballbearings in case hardened steel, even grade 25s are very cheap - why cut the corner? Case hardened ...


3

Try carefully using an adjustable pin spanner, or the Park variant. If not, I believe current Mavic hubs use the same pin pattern, so the plastic tools that come with Mavic wheelsets is plentiful and may be strong enough for your use.


3

I don't necessarily recommend it, but I own a Vitus 979 and did this about 10 years ago so I could upgrade to a 9 speed cassette and STI shifters. I haven't had any problems with it. But I haven't put a lot of miles on it since the change and I'm under 150 lbs. Some of those miles have been on dirt roads. I stripped the frame about a year ago and the ...


3

I've seen this issue in the past and the culprit was the axle (not the skewer) in the hub had snapped. Fortunately, the bike was still rideable to a certain extent, as the QR skewer was holding the two broken sections of axle in place. Note that even when the wheel was removed from the frame, it still wasn't immediately obvious that the axle had snapped, ...


3

Use the Rivolta grease and you will be fine. Most important is that it is dense enough, will last over time, stays fluid in low temperature and that it is somewhat water resistance. According to the pdf, the Rivolta will do all those things very good.


3

Sounds to me like classic symptoms of a dirty drivetrain. If your chain is getting slack on top when you stop pedalling or backpedal, then the problem is in your freehub (or freewheel, whichever you have), a dirty freehub will cause all the problems you've listed, even on a brand new bike. When dirt and grit mixed with excess chain oil get gummed up in the ...


3

The bike is made by Univega and probably has a freewheel. If the pedaling motion still works, I'd guess your freewheel is shot (the thing that the gears are on in the back). You have to remove it with a freewheel remover and put on a new one. This requires a freewheel remover tool and a large wrench or vise, so you might want to take it to a shop and let ...


3

Probably you need to service that hub - or get it serviced by your LBS. That much drag means that either it's full of dirt, or the grease has completely dried up or water contaminated, or the bearings have collapsed. None of those are likely to be fatal, but you would be well advised to open that hub up and clean it out, check the bearings, and re-grease ...


3

As you're not clear on road vs mtb, there's two answers. For 11 spd road drivetrains Shimano uses a 1.85mm wider hub with the drive side flange closer to the centerline to compensate for the additional width. Using a spacer allows the wheel to be backwards compatible to fit a 10 spd cassette. You can't fit a 11spd freehub in place of a 10spd freehub unless ...


2

Time traveling here... If that type of spalling occurs after several thousand miles, then that's most likely normal wear from the little bit of play vs road vibration, etc. If that occurs within 200 miles, then it means your cone nuts are too tight. Some people here say there should be no play, but that is incorrect. There should be a tiny bit of play in ...


2

The simple answer is yes, you can add washers to the axle and shove it in. If you put all the washers on the chain side the disk brake will still work without modification, at the expense of a crappy chain line (assuming you have derailleur gears - with a singlespeed you'll probably have to change the BB or you'll often drop the chain). Or you can space both ...


2

Sheldon Brown to the rescue: "Shimano uses the trademark "Hyperglide-C" to designate a system with an 11 tooth sprocket. The "C" stands for "compact". These systems are used with smaller-than-usual chainwheel sizes, or on bicycles that have a small drive wheel, or to achieve higher gears. Due to clearance problems, the cutaway between the splines on ...


2

I've been researching the same thing. Even built my own tool of sorts by drilling two holes through a wrench and inserting drill bits to act as pegs. The wrench is about 6" long and there's no hope in hell either of the "washers" are going to come off. My experiment didn't mess up the holes but I'd say there's a good reason for 6 pins on the Mavic 670 key. ...


2

Bearings and races are made of very hard steel. So long as they are properly maintained (lubricated and adjusted to the correct tightness; visit Free Ride in Pittsburgh for help lubing/adjusting your bike if it's feeling worn and you don't want to pay a shop to do it for you), they should hold up with no problem. More info: ...


2

I have figured out two options: The less elegant option is just putting some washers on the end of your axle. You have to fiddle with the washers every time you take off your wheel, but they will do the job. If you want to avoid that, you have to put them inside the locknut. If your wheel is such that the bottom of the locknut is outside of your cassette ...


2

super-reliable not too heavy low maintenance not super expensive Any Shimano XT hub M76X - M77X. Also confider the newer T7XX "touring XT" models. Shimano hubs are exclusively (afaik) loose-bearing rather than cartridge hubs, so they're easily serviceable and the balls are available almost everywhere. The XT range should also have decent seals, durable ...


2

You likely need to tighten the hub bearings. I'd take it to a shop and ask for a hub bearing adjustment. On most hubs I'd say you can do it yourself but the Nexus series are complicated and have different features depending on the model. This means most step-by-step directions for standard hubs won't apply. E.g. it may have a brake built into it. ...


2

Details found here: http://productinfo.shimano.com/specifications.html Spoke Hole P.C.D. Left/Right (mm) 45 Flange distance (mm) 57.9 Dish (mm) 8.4 Based on these figures, I would calculate the following values for your chosen Spoke Length Calculator: Centreline to Left flange: 37.35mm Centreline to Right flange: 20.55 Spoke hole diameter is not given. ...


2

If it screws on then it is a freewheel not a cassette. They are not the same. There is a link in my comment. Your spacer kit with one sprocket was probably for cassette / freehub. It is not going to work. I suspect you can find a freewheel single speed conversion. You need a single speed freewheel - not a sprocket and a lockring.



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