Hot answers tagged

6

Yes - one or two torque arms will help. Otherwise all the impulse is being send through your dropouts, which will be steel and will flex. This undoes the wheel nuts over time. This also fretts out the dropouts whih will cost you a new fork. Do you have anti-rotation washers in the fork dropouts too? Even my 250W motor needed them. More info: From ...


6

That's a freehub body. Look on the hub for the model of hub you have, and then you can use that to find the appropriate freehub body model by looking at the documentation of the hub.


5

With a trapped axle like that you use a hammer, ideally a soft face one or I use a bit of wood as a pad. Hold the block against the axle, tap the block with a hammer. Holding the wheel in your hand rather than blocking it against a solid surface also reduces the impact. You will still probably damage the bearings, so preferably don't do this until you have ...


5

A bearing that is adjusted too tight can actually seize completely. This happened to me once. I overhauled my front hub and tightened the bearing cones too much. Result: a front wheel that plain stopped turning at some point. Too tight adjustment will exert more pressure on the cones and cups, and will probably wear out the bearings faster than too loose ...


5

Summary: buying just the dust-cap is unlikely, normally you buy new cones and often a new axle, but that's because new cones are cheap. You'd only buy a new hub if something else is damaged (rare). You won't be able to fit sealed bearings. I the picture below from the Park site is the bearing cone and cap. I assume that's the cap you're talking about? ...


4

Campagnolo wheels are available with both Shimano/SRAM and Campagnolo cassette compatible freewheel bodies. Ask which cassette your friend has and if they have Campagnolo, you can get the correct freehub body as a spare part. SRAM/Shimano and Campagnolo cassettes have slightly different cog spacing. You can mix them, but the derailleur adjustment will be ...


4

I've used the hammer method on my goldtec hubs back when I was a push bike courier in London. Reckon my rear hub did something like 80,000 miles in 6 years, changed bearings twice... I was definitely what you'd call a bush mechanic....but think hammer method is fine.


4

The width, from locknut to locknut.


4

Here's a guide for overhauling a cup-and-cone low-end Shimano dynamo: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/34057344/Overhauling_Shimano_Dynamo_Hubs.pdf The main caution from that article concerns the connector-side cone & nut and the aluminum wire underneath them: Using your finger to prevent the plug assembly from turning, break the lock nut from ...


4

When you have a threaded cog, its designed to tighten when you pedal forward due to the threading direction. So, it doesn't come loose. When you skid stop or stop by resisting the pedals on a fixie, you apply torque the opposite way on the cog loosening it. The lockring is supposed to prevent this by its threading. But if the lockring is loose, all bets ...


4

Almost certainly the gear cable has come off the hub at the point where it's adjustable. Without knowing which make and model of hub you have I can't be more specific than that. If the bike is new take it back and get them to show you how to fix it, or at the very least fix it for you. If not, work out what hub you have (the manufacturer plus five speed ...


3

There aren't many repair or maintenance parts on a Shimano dynamo hub. At best, you can replace the sealed bearings (on the units that have them) or adjust the cones on the ones that don't. The most likely failure mode in your case is that either the 1) main electrical leads have oxidized; 2) or an internal wire has broken. My guess is that since your ...


3

Put your shifter in 4th gear. Adjust the cable tension so that the yellow lines match. There really isn't more to it. Not much to do wrong. If you can then shift all the way up to 8 and down to 1, the basic installation is correct. However ... from my experience, these hubs change a little over time. Mine (Alfine 8, basically the same thing) shows slippage ...


2

Short answer: NO, there are quite a lot of pre-built wheels made for use on older bikes (or new ones) that come set up for a freewheel rather than a cassette. There is a US based company called Wheel Master that most shops can get. I see you're in Canada but I still think you should be able to get them from a shop. I would not suggest trying to rebuild ...


2

The two notches are to remove the bearing race and dismantle the freehub body often resulting in tiny bearings going everywhere and there a nightmare to re-assemble. If you want to remove the freehub body intact you need to use a 12mm Allan key from the opposite side of the hub.


2

It looks like the washer in your photo may be a "Wedge-Lock" washer like those available here: http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-washers/=xhptlp They appear to sell under the names "Heico-Lock" & "Nord-Lock". This may be a UK source: http://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/fasteners-fixings/nuts-washers/locking-anti-vibration-washers/ I should note that there ...


2

Road front hubs are 100 mm and 8-10 speed rear hubs are 130 mm. In the case of the Trek 1.1, it's always been spec'd with a 8 speed rear hub, so those wheels should fit on the bike.


2

If you want to make a very large flange hub (to produce shorter spoke lengths and produce a stiffer wheel), bonding a large metal flange to a carbon hub shell is not a bad idea. If you try doing it with a one piece design, the larger shell (coming from the larger flange) would likely make the hub heavy. Making the shell out of carbon instead has the the ...


2

Which hubs are you thinking about? It would be very hard to make a carbon hub flange strong enough to withstand spoke tension, assuming you are building a wheel with conventional spokes. Most carbon hubs I have seen use aluminum flanges, and the few which offer significant weight savings are ultralight equipment not for general use. Carbon probably won't ...


2

If the cones were over tightened you would likely feel two distinct notched, one finer one caused by over tightening the bearing cone and a coarser notch caused by the magnet/coil interaction. Because you only described one type of notch I would hazard a guess that it is the magnet/coil interaction, which is normal.


2

The feeling of notches is just the resistance you feel from moving the magnets past the coils in the hub. That's what generates the power. The hub is fine! When you actually ride the bike you won't feel a thing. Well, at least I don't feel anything. Some people have said they feel vibrations from their dynamo hub at lower speeds.


2

In your update, you note that rather than absolute failure, you have varying light intensity on bumpy roads. This could be for two reasons: This is normal dynamo behavior at low speeds. Basically until you reach a minimum speed (around 10-15km/h), your dynamo power will vary with your speed. Hitting a bump often means a sharp increase or decrease in hub ...


2

I think wheel chair hubs are what you are looking for. If you need disk brakes, Cannondale Lefty hubs are another off the shelf solution.


2

The DT Swiss 240s front hub is a sealed bearing hub. Service includes removing the endcaps, removing the bearing seals, regreasing the bearing cartridge, and then reversing the process. There are no special tools required. The end caps are a friction fit, and, while they are tight, they will remove by hand. If bearings are damaged, replace the entire ...


1

This article on Cartridge Wheel Bearing Maintenance on the Art's Cyclery site says: When it comes time to replace the bearings, every hub is a little different. For hubs like this one from Easton, the axle has internal shoulders that require one bearing and the axle to be removed at the same time. To do this, tap on the end of the axle with a soft-faced ...


1

No, this sounds like way too much play, even though the lock-ring is tight it could be tightening up against the freehub and not the cassette. If you can wiggle the sprockets apart a bit, or slide them along the freehub then the cassette is not being held properly by the lockring. Then you just need to add some spacers. Shimano lock-rings should "click" ...


1

Shimano Alfine hubs have a specific requirements for axle nut tightening. First, grease the axle nuts! Because the nuts are domed, they can accumulate grit inside them, and hold less securely over time. Secondly, the nuts have a minimum torque range of 30 ft/lbs. This is important, since if they are too loose, the non-turn washers can move and dig into your ...


1

I was all set to return the Alfine hub to the manufacturer and when I went to take it off I realised the wheel nuts were loose. Tightening the nuts solved the problem. It seems the hub not being fixed in place was causing it to be moved in the wrong direction and shifting to the lowest gear was pulling the mechanism too far inside the hub.


1

Really hard to say without knowing what hub you're running. Most likely the pawls failed inside the cassette body. The pawls and springs are the mechanism which allow cassette to spin freely independent of the wheel (like when you coast or spin the cranks backward). When forward pressure is applied to the cassette the pawls and springs engage and thus move ...


1

I think @itsthejash has some good tips but I'd also suggest taking the rotor off the hub and making sure there is no dirt or other material on part of the mounting surface of the hub, thus pushing it out in one spot. Maybe use some cleaner to ensure the surface of the hub and rotor are clean on the faces that meet during mounting. Also - when you engage ...



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