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0

I have an old RSX hub on my road bike - when servicing the bearings, the cones were found to be horribly pitted. So I tool the old cones into an LBS and asked for replacements. They whipped out vernier calipers and measured, and found some suitable ones. One was $21 and the other was $4 NZD. To move the dust cap over, I simply used the right size of ...


-1

It is possible to buy/find the individual parts you are asking for. However, you need to know the exact model # of the hub. For cheap hubs, it is sometimes cheaper to buy an entire hub and then cannibalize the new one's axle and cups/cones/balls/etc... You'd do that to prevent having to re-lace the wheel. Usually though, it is much cheaper to just trash ...


5

Summary: buying just the dust-cap is unlikely, normally you buy new cones and often a new axle, but that's because new cones are cheap. You'd only buy a new hub if something else is damaged (rare). You won't be able to fit sealed bearings. I the picture below from the Park site is the bearing cone and cap. I assume that's the cap you're talking about? ...


4

When you have a threaded cog, its designed to tighten when you pedal forward due to the threading direction. So, it doesn't come loose. When you skid stop or stop by resisting the pedals on a fixie, you apply torque the opposite way on the cog loosening it. The lockring is supposed to prevent this by its threading. But if the lockring is loose, all bets ...


4

Here's a guide for overhauling a cup-and-cone low-end Shimano dynamo: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/34057344/Overhauling_Shimano_Dynamo_Hubs.pdf The main caution from that article concerns the connector-side cone & nut and the aluminum wire underneath them: Using your finger to prevent the plug assembly from turning, break the lock nut from ...


2

In your update, you note that rather than absolute failure, you have varying light intensity on bumpy roads. This could be for two reasons: This is normal dynamo behavior at low speeds. Basically until you reach a minimum speed (around 10-15km/h), your dynamo power will vary with your speed. Hitting a bump often means a sharp increase or decrease in hub ...


3

There aren't many repair or maintenance parts on a Shimano dynamo hub. At best, you can replace the sealed bearings (on the units that have them) or adjust the cones on the ones that don't. The most likely failure mode in your case is that either the 1) main electrical leads have oxidized; 2) or an internal wire has broken. My guess is that since your ...



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