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2

I've seen this issue in the past and the culprit was the axle (not the skewer) in the hub had snapped. Fortunately, the bike was still rideable to a certain extent, as the QR skewer was holding the two broken sections of axle in place. However the whole wheel was replaced ASAP for safety reasons. Due to the age of the wheel (15-20 years), it was more ...


5

The first thing to note is "Does the 8 speed hub clear the dropouts ?" You may be able to spread the frame if steel. Since you're likely going from a 120mm to 130 mm (which is 2 sizes - 120->126->130), you should be cold setting it. The second question would be "Can the brakes reach the rim?" Unfortunately, to my knowledge, nobody makes a 5 speed ...


4

By accident I think I came across some valuable information. http://www.notubes.com/help/troubleshooting.aspx Why is my cassette digging into my freehub body? Stan's freehubs are made lightweight using aluminum like many other brands. It is necessary to make the lockring extra tight to avoid significant wear on the freehub. We recommend using ...


4

I don't believe there is a lot that can be done as this has to due with the material selection for the freehub body shell (soft aluminum). Below is an image of a Velocity hub (on my commute bike) that had the same problem. I actually had to hammer the cassette off of the hub body. In this case a Tiagra cassette (where most of the cogs are pinned together) ...


3

There is supposed to be a locknut on the axle, as well as the cone. When adjusting the bearings it's important to get the locknut quite tight against the cone, so that the pair cannot rotate on the threaded axle. As you've found, if the cone can rotate then it will, from the rotation of the wheel. The left side will get looser (but will be somewhat ...


0

Front hubs on mountain bikes and road bikes are all the same width, 100mm (except for some downhill hubs with through-axles). So you could use either type, they would fit in your forks fine. Note nearly all current mountain bike hubs are designed for disc brakes, so include mounts for attaching a rotor. You can still use them on a bike with rim brakes, just ...


0

Re: Using a spacer and grinding down the 3 pins that hold the cassette together: It would be simpler to grind 3 notches in the spacer itself, which preserves the original cassette strength. That can easily be done with a rat-tail file or power tool. I find it dubious that those pins simply exist for convenience, which seems like Internet bro-science that ...


3

In almost all cases when servicing a hub the bearing DO need to be replaced. You may not be able to see it without the aid of a microscope, but the bearings will be slightly pitted after any appreciable period of use. As one user points out, high grade ballbearings in case hardened steel, even grade 25s are very cheap - why cut the corner? Case hardened ...


2

I've been researching the same thing. Even built my own tool of sorts by drilling two holes through a wrench and inserting drill bits to act as pegs. The wrench is about 6" long and there's no hope in hell either of the "washers" are going to come off. My experiment didn't mess up the holes but I'd say there's a good reason for 6 pins on the Mavic 670 key. ...


0

If all else fails you could just replace the hub/axel. Provided you can find one where all the dimensions are the same (flange spacing, flange diameter, number of holes, axel length matches drop-out spacing, etc), then you can re-use the same spokes/rim. Just unlace, then relace. Or if you simply want to get back to the pedaling and don't want to deal ...


5

That looks fixable to me. What probably happened is the locknut was loose, and continued riding caused both cone and locknut to unscrew. It's a good job you've stopped riding that bike - riding on that hub now would cause significant damage. When a hub has a bit of play, the balls are free to move across parts of the cup and cone that aren't designed to ...



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