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4

Most everyone else has concentrated on the physical and/or your bike, and rightly so. But the one thing I'd like to add is the mental side of riding hills. Here is the one thing I'd like you to keep in mind: You can do more than you think you can Try it next time you're going up that hill. Just as you're about to get off to walk, look about 20 feet ahead ...


2

There are many good replies here. Read them a few times and consider carefully what everyone is saying. Based on my experience-- I totally lacked any fitness when I began to ride again as a middle-aged adult-- the hill you're trying to ride is a little ambitious, if you're carrying a few extra pounds and your fitness has not been developed sufficiently. ...


2

My problem was always going off too quickly to begin with. Don't watch the pros to begin with. My tip is to go real slow. Get the lowest gear and just plod along. You can do almost any climb if you do it slow enough. Once you've done it slow to prove to yourself the hill can be beaten, repeat, but pick up the tempo as the top is in sight. As you improve, ...


5

I had this problem some years ago. I commuted to work Monday to Friday. It was very simple, I rode as far as I felt comfortable and then got off and pushed the bike. As the days and weeks went by, I noticed that I was getting further and further up the hill before needing to get off. I even started to notice small landmarks to measure my progress. ...


4

The good news is that climbing is a great way to get fit! As Eddy Merckx said: "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." Listen to your body and get a feel for how hard you can push continuously, and what it feels like when you go above that (for example, I start feeling slightly nauseous). You can look up aerobic vs anaerobic to learn more about what happens. ...


2

One thing I haven't seen mentioned is that climbing is not just about legs. Your upper body plays a large part in the process. Personally, I feel like it is 50% legs, and 50% arms and core. I can't back that up with any studies, but I believe it to be true. Your upper body does a lot of work stabilizing the bike and providing the leverage your legs need to ...


5

(1) Go Slow and Go Easy On Yourself. Climbing hills is supposed to be hard! You are carrying 250 lbs (you, bike, your stuff) 264 feet straight up over that mile. I was riding once with a guy who has a PowerTap hub (a $500 toy for bike nerds and pro athletes that reports energy expenditure on your bike computer), and he said the main thing he had learned ...


6

The bike can do it, and so can you, though maybe not yet. My old commute had a 20-25% hill on it, and my bottom gear was 28x32 on 700x35 tyres. It took a few goes before I could ride up it without stopping. It wasn't as long as yours but the total climb was probably similar. Take it easy, you don't want to be breathing hard on approach (a slightly ...


2

Something that can help is called your "stroke". A novice is inclined to push straight down on the pedal ... and then, straight down on the other pedal ... so that you're pushing down, and then pushing down. A more experienced rider has a more continuous "cycle": Push the pedal forward when it's at the top (i.e. at "12 o'clock") Push the pedal down when ...


6

You already have some good, helpful answers. Well done for sticking at that hill! Make sure you're riding on slick tires, and have them pumped up pretty hard. Soft, wide tires would rob much of your effort. Regarding the hill. There are several things involved in sustained climbing Technique. Do you rush at it the bottom? Or do you try to just settle to ...


26

The gearing of your bike seems reasonable, the 26 front/34 rear combination will (eventually) make climbing hills easy. But till then… Before you do anything else, take @cherouvim's advice and make sure you seat is at a reasonable height. It should be high enough that if you place a heel on the low pedal your leg is almost fully extended (just short of ...


8

There are no shortcuts, it's about building the legs, and lungs, and body. There may be some factors that could make it a little easier, but the main factor is getting strong enough, which takes some time and some dedication. Starting in the easiest gear may not be the best choice as it can make a climb seem endless. Try to get into the hill at good speed, ...


2

Your bikes gearing might not be ideal for you. Your bike will be like most and have a large overlap. The size of the cogs is what is most important here. If after a few rides you are not seeing improvement, think about getting the bike setup with lower gearing. Its often an easy job (But can get expensive depending on all sorts of things) and does not cost ...


11

Just keep on doing the same route and you'll see progress very fast. Also this will soon not be true: It's not so fun on the way back though Some tips to make it: make sure that the tyres are inflated correctly make sure your drivetrain runs smooth and the chain is lubed make sure your seat height is correct (ask your LBS if unsure) conserve energy ...


2

About two years ago I converted my 2011 Dew to drop bars. I opted for Avid BB7 Road mechanical disc brakes as they are compatible with short pull road brake levers. For shifters I chose to use bar ends because of their lower price and more simple design compared to STI levers. I ended up with a cost of about $325 for my 8 speed bar end shifters, Cane ...


1

Actually knowing if a bike frame is the correct size based on height is nearly impossible, they are best guesses. When looking at fitting a bike there are so many different things a fitter will look at. First lets look at what changes on the bicycle when you change frame size:- Top Tube (TT) - this is normally measured as a theoretical as this tube is not ...



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