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There are many things that make biking more difficult in the cold. By far the largest factor is air resistance. At normal temperatures, the air drag grows as the square of the speed, and becomes greater than the sum of all other losses at speeds over 12km/h. A 30C drop in temperature makes the air about 10% denser, and drag is proportional to air density. ...


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I bike all winter long, down to -30°C, there are some definite tolls to your bike at colder temperatures. Unlike a vehicle that warms up after the engine has been running for a while, bikes stay cold when you ride them cold. There are two things I notice the most, air pressure is definitely one of them; cold air shrinks, and low tires drag, so if you're ...


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If you haven't biked in a while, that may have contributed. However, an unwinterized bicycle can easily be useless at those temperatures. Your bike contains several compartments with grease. As it gets colder, the grease gets thicker and you are pedaling against it as well as whatever weight you are carrying. Your bottom bracket, wheel hubs and pedals ...


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The short version: the bike was fine (maybe low on tire pressure) but you were not, provided you didn't have something like a brake dragging (which you would have noticed). I doubt a bike would have retained air in its tires for a few months, so you should have pumped them up [this may have added some rolling resistance, but it shouldn't have killed you on ...


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Basically the same on paper except ones a 7 speed and the other a 21 speed. Looks like the same frame painted a different colour.


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One common problem with people who are new to cycling is that they tend to under-inflate the tyres. Too low tyre pressure means increased rolling friction which is likely to be quite noticeable. (At higher speeds the air resistance is dominant, but not really at these speeds.) Exactly how high pressure is a hotly debated question, but as a rule it should be ...


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From the web site that bike comes with 40T chainring and a 14-28T Freewheel. 17.94 kmph is a cadence of only 50. bikecalc.com You should be up at 80+. On a sprint you should go over 100. A folding bike is not as efficient as most full size bike but gearing is not what is holding you back at 18 kmph. Not going to give specific hybrids but there are many ...


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What is your "cadence" (number of pedal revolutions per minute)? A healthy young cyclist should be able to "cruise" at 80-90 rpm, and that would be considered your top speed. If at 80 rpm you're only getting 18kmph (11mph) in your fastest gear then your bike gearing is quite low and you probably need to change something. But many novice cyclists simply ...


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Headshok is super-stiff, light and solid. There is virtually zero stiction and the damping is butter-smooth. I have a vintage, 2001 Bad Boy Ultra with Headshok and only recently re-built it (2013) – that's 13 years of reliable operation! The guy who serviced it said I'll easily get another 15-18 years' use, as the updated bearings and seals are even better ...


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From years of experience, I have found that riding with your upper body (arms/ chest / back) flexed, you will get a significantly better upper body work out than with your upper body relaxed, where you don't get any work out. If your riding on rough terrain try to jump and wheelie your front tire over objects here and there; if your riding on the street, try ...



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