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2

Having ridden most bikes I found the best was a hybrid style bike for a similar commute, 4 miles (6.4 km) in town, 1 massive hill and 4 miles (6.4 km) in the countryside with a back pack on. Dropbars in town makes it harder for you to see around /over traffic and makes you slightly smaller when people are looking at you about to pull out and harder to hit ...


6

8 miles each way is a reasonable commute. In the city a pure road bike is not as stable. You should test both flat and drop bars to see which is more comfortable for you. Drop are a little more efficient but that is not a long commute. For an uphill I think flat bars are fine. A full touring bike is probably more than you need unless you are ...


1

I have a hybrid with a flat bar, a "FBR1 Norco". I cut down the bar length to be 18 inches (45 centimetres) the same width as a road bike handle bar. This is very short for a mountain bike, but my hybrid is for straight road, the loss of width was outweighed by the ability to tuck my elbows in for aerodynamics. I also raised my seat to get into a real ...


1

Outside the box possibilities. Is there something that stops you riding your bike in the winter? Yes winter is colder and wetter, and depending on your location there may be snow. Perhaps a snow bike would be more year-round.... that's a rigid MTB with studded tyres for winter and commuter tyres for summer. Second option is to look at hanging your ...


-1

Just a 5mm allen will get you a lot if you have quick release wheels. Just drop seat and spin the bars. Lace the pedals between the spokes of the removed wheels. In a dorm closet you can hang socks on the bar. You just need to get it against the wall. For college you might as well get a kit to also do basic maintenance. Essential Tool Kit ESSENTIAL TOOL ...


1

I take a single multitool when I travel to disassemble/reassemble my bike. I have an older model crank brothers tool that they don't make anymore, but something similar is available here. I run pedals that can be taken on and off with a 8mm hex, so I don't need a pedal wrench. Without a complete breakdown of your bike and all it's parts, one would be ...


6

You want to remove the wheels, seat post (you may be able to get away with setting this all the way at the bottom or doing nothing depending on how you're storing it), handlebars and pedals. If you can go to your local bike shop and get a (cardboard) box for shipping bikes, the bike should pack in nicely for storage. This video shows you the steps in a nice ...


3

Set of Allen (hex) key: usually 4,5 and 6 mm would do the job. You can use these Allen key for disassembling handlebar, stem, seatpost, and most pedals Adjustable wrench or (usually) 15 mm wrench: (check if needed) in order to remove the pedal. You could usually remove the pedal with 8 mm Allen key (sometimes could be 5 mm, 6 mm, or 10 mm). Check if there ...


5

You will want: hex/allen key set (check standard vs. metric) pedal wrench ratchet set or box wrenches (crescent wrench as last alternative) gardening gloves to keep your hands clean Ensure that you do not strip the fasteners as metric/standard can be a very close fit sometimes. Save some old t-shirts or towels to wrap around the drive-train to keep it ...



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