Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Best? Doesn't seem like there's any one right answer. Pros for carrying on bike: Weight is on the bike, not you Doesn't make your back all sweaty No adjustments necessary Generally easier to clean Easier to choose alternate beverage options (with the right bottle) Easier to just always have a water bottle on the bike (one less thing to worry about ...


18

I'm not a commuter, but I believe in putting something that must not be forgotten next to something that might be forgotten. For instance, I would put my bike gloves on top of my water bottles. (I do the same thing when I have people over to visit. If there's something in the fridge that I want them to take home, I put their car keys in the fridge on top ...


12

Plan your route accordingly. Make sure there's a couple gas stations or restaurants along the way that you could stop at if the need arises. It's probably a good idea to be somewhat close to civilization not only for urination purposes, but also in case you have some major mechanical problem with your bike, or you fall and get hurt. This doesn't mean your ...


10

Water bottles?? Clean and hygienic?? If you can scrape off the crust of road mud on the spout they're clean enough. (Actually, I just rinse mine out in very hot tap water, though for a brand new one I'll use a few drops of dish soap to help get rid of the manufacturing oils and the plastic taste. Sometimes for new bottles I'll fill them with hot water ...


10

This link "Quick note: Eating is the key to long distance biking" says, If you don't eat, you have an hour, maybe two, of energy stored up. Fortunately it's prescriptive too, saying, And what should these calories be? Well, something easy on your stomach and fairly light. There are special sporting-related products that are generally right ...


9

Entirely depends on the lenght of ride. If you're riding for less than 2 hours then your body already has everything on board that it needs. If you're working for more than 2 hours you should eat complex carbs (pasta, oatmeal) 2 hours before the ride so that they have time to digest before you actually need them. Also eating too much just before can limit ...


9

Yes, too many electrolytes can do all sorts of bad things to you. Good article here: http://www.livestrong.com/article/521763-can-you-consume-too-much-electrolytes/ The U.S. Army has done a lot of research, here's probably the most pertinent paper: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10410838 In general, if you are mixing the drinks according to the ...


9

I see snowboarders with an insulating cover over the tube. If that doesn't provide enough insulation, I've worn my pack under my jacket leaving the entire pack, tube and bite valve covered and insulated. Here is a 3 foot Hydration Pack Insulated Drink Tube Cover on amazon for $7 US


8

I hang my helmet on the bottle cage. I almost always notice it's empty when I grab the helmet. In the past I've stuck a sock monkey in the cage at the end of the ride. I thought I would always notice the sock monkey. But when you start out early in the morning sometimes you don't see things like that. I finally figured it out from the funny looks I was ...


7

Get yourself two hose clamps that'll fit around the tube and some rubber strips to put under then so they don't scratch the paint up too badly. They'll hold a bottle cage on just fine. If you can see under the dirt and grime, that's exactly how the bottle cage in this picture is mounted: Edit: Here's another picture of a bottle cage mounted with hose ...


7

Unfortunately, I don't feel able to talk about food QUALITY, since even "vegan" can mean a lot of things these days, and this understanding varies from person to person. Just to illustrate, I'm not sure to suggest cheese, honey, milk and eggs, although I do find these to be excellent heavy-fuels for cycling. Now what I do feel sure to advise, being an ...


6

50km isn't that enormous of a distance - and especially for someone who does 18km twice a day. It sounds like your current pace would have you completing that in about three hours. I'd bring a snack or two if you're worried about being peckish, but unless you're going all-out for a personal record or you skip breakfast you should have no issues. Just keep ...


6

The core of this question seems to be the following: Where do you keep your water to optimize speed/agility/enjoyment? Disclaimer: I've never had a Camelbak, but I do drink water! Speed: If you mean speed of access, keeping water in a bladder is obviously the winner. If you're concerned with aerodynamics, I'd think the answer is a toss-up. ...


6

It is extremely important that you eat and drink properly when cycling in extremes of temperature. In Dubai, where riding in the summer means riding regularly in 50c temperatures, this is a major problem. Eating is less of a concern than hydration, but you want to avoid dehydrators, like alcohol, in your food. You also want to watch what spices and ...


5

The tube has a lot of surface area and not a lot of volume, so it's going to lose heat quickly compared to the reservoir. In addition to insulating the tube mentioned by Glenn Gervais you can start with hot water in the reservoir and frequently drink a little bit to keep reheating the tube. This Nordic skiing article discusses this technique in more detail. ...


4

I bike commute and do a lot other exercise, and have learned that it is indeed possible to eat too much before a ride. If I'm going to be biking early enough in the day, I'll usually just eat a very light snack, like a banana or a glass of smoothie or juice, and depending on the length of the ride, have a snack bar or juice box part way through the ride. ...


4

I have used old wine cask bags (or bladders, readily available in Australia, not too sure about rest of the world) packed either into a pannier or strapped onto the top of the rear rack (not the best position but I was fully loaded). Some would say the slight after taste of wine is a bonus. I have also seen unused bladders available from some camping ...


3

If you're looking to go minimal footprint, with no storage, why not go no bag? These definitely have downsides, but they fit under anything, with any type of clothing, or sport. Camelbak VeloBak Hydration Jersey or Camelbak Racebak Hydration Vest Downsides include water which must be cooled, or will heat to body temp. Check out the linked reviews.


3

Water is actually extremely dense, and heavier than people think; it can be difficult to carry. My solution is to carry water in four standard cycling water bottles. In addition to the two bottle cages on my touring bike's frame, I also purchased two plastic water bottle cages that fit on my front panniers: You can carry bottles of water in your panniers ...


3

Dehydration is probably your biggest worry in the heat. Checking the colour of your urine is one way to tell if you're becoming dehydrated. Fresh fruit contains water so would be preferable to dried fruit, but obviously it's less convenient to transport. I have used sports drinks when running (specifically Lucozade Sport) and I find it helps, but that ...


3

If your kidneys are functioning properly the body will eliminate excess amounts of "electrolytes" -- potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, etc -- without much difficulty. If you have kidney disease, though, you should discuss the issue with your docs. Other stuff in some supplements -- herbals, carnitine, etc -- can be harder to eliminate. And the ...


3

I'd recommend you read this series of four articles on hydration and electrolytes from The Science of Sport, the blog maintained by Ross Tucker and Johnathan Dugas. They are two South African sport scientists, disciples of Dr. Timothy Noakes, author of Lore of Running and a respected researcher in all things sport physiology. As an indication, he published ...


3

I carry: Two water bottles (on accelerade, one Nuun) Tail wedge, with multi-tool, patch kit, tire levers, spare tube, CO2 inflator, emergency food (sport beans), wallet, keys. Bento box with cell phone, drugs (salt tablets, ibuprofen, sinus) Pump mounted on one water bottle cage. jersey pockets with powdered accelerate, Nuun tablets, real food. I'll ...


3

I've ridden many sportives at this distance in the UK and here is my experience. Food/Drink Looking at the route map there are 3 food stops and 11 water stops so you don't need to carry loads with you. I'd say a 750ml bottle will do. If you find you drink a lot on your training rides then take a second bottle. Food will be available at the stops but you ...


3

I've got a Cambelbak MULE which has about 11l of pack capacity. I found that this is quite enough for day-long rides, far from any roads. I packed: tools spare tube patch kit pump a spare tyre sometimes some food (energy bars and similar low-volume-high-yield food) small first aid kit rain jacket a warm undershirt if necessary My fullface helmet could be ...


3

The 10 liter has enough room for your tools and also a coat, a snack or two, and probably a shirt and a few other small items. If you're not worried about bringing much else, you'll probably be fine with the 10. Even if you are going to need to bring an entire change of clothes or more food, the 14 liter isn't really going to make much of a difference, in ...


2

You might get into the habit of inspecting your bike before you take off. I check the tires and the brakes every time I pull the bike off its rack. Check your cages along with it. Mentally I classify water along with protective gear, probably giving it more weight than a helmet. It isn't something that's merely nice to have because you're a little ...


2

always having spare bottle is never hurt, making sure you'll have clean bottle whenever you needed one i have developed habit to drink just before riding (always). even if not thirsty which mean i'll have to check my bottle, and if something wrong (like the bottle was empty) i still at home (office) i'm using bicycle as my main method of transportation ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible