Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Best? Doesn't seem like there's any one right answer. Pros for carrying on bike: Weight is on the bike, not you Doesn't make your back all sweaty No adjustments necessary Generally easier to clean Easier to choose alternate beverage options (with the right bottle) Easier to just always have a water bottle on the bike (one less thing to worry about ...


18

I'm not a commuter, but I believe in putting something that must not be forgotten next to something that might be forgotten. For instance, I would put my bike gloves on top of my water bottles. (I do the same thing when I have people over to visit. If there's something in the fridge that I want them to take home, I put their car keys in the fridge on top ...


12

I leave anything I don't want to forget infront of the front door such that I cannot open it without knocking the thing over.


12

Plan your route accordingly. Make sure there's a couple gas stations or restaurants along the way that you could stop at if the need arises. It's probably a good idea to be somewhat close to civilization not only for urination purposes, but also in case you have some major mechanical problem with your bike, or you fall and get hurt. This doesn't mean your ...


11

Maltodextrin. It is basically pure glucose, which is the only sugar that your muscles can use directly without converting, so it's just pure energy. It also has no flavor or sweetness, so it is completely inoffensive, and you can sweeten (or not) to your desired level. Look in any sport beverage and it will contain maltodextrin. A lot of home brewing ...


11

The trick is to blow the water back up the tube and into the reservoir right after you take a drink. This will keep your tube and bite valve from freezing. This works well even at well below freezing temperatures when skiing.


10

This link "Quick note: Eating is the key to long distance biking" says, If you don't eat, you have an hour, maybe two, of energy stored up. Fortunately it's prescriptive too, saying, And what should these calories be? Well, something easy on your stomach and fairly light. There are special sporting-related products that are generally right ...


10

I wash mine in a dishwasher. Mostly because that requires the least effort. I've had to replace bottles occasionally, I find that eventually the nozzle on the cap starts to leak.


10

Water bottles?? Clean and hygienic?? If you can scrape off the crust of road mud on the spout they're clean enough. (Actually, I just rinse mine out in very hot tap water, though for a brand new one I'll use a few drops of dish soap to help get rid of the manufacturing oils and the plastic taste. Sometimes for new bottles I'll fill them with hot water ...


9

Entirely depends on the lenght of ride. If you're riding for less than 2 hours then your body already has everything on board that it needs. If you're working for more than 2 hours you should eat complex carbs (pasta, oatmeal) 2 hours before the ride so that they have time to digest before you actually need them. Also eating too much just before can limit ...


9

Yes, too many electrolytes can do all sorts of bad things to you. Good article here: http://www.livestrong.com/article/521763-can-you-consume-too-much-electrolytes/ The U.S. Army has done a lot of research, here's probably the most pertinent paper: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10410838 In general, if you are mixing the drinks according to the ...


9

I see snowboarders with an insulating cover over the tube. If that doesn't provide enough insulation, I've worn my pack under my jacket leaving the entire pack, tube and bite valve covered and insulated. Here is a 3 foot Hydration Pack Insulated Drink Tube Cover on amazon for $7 US


8

I hang my helmet on the bottle cage. I almost always notice it's empty when I grab the helmet. In the past I've stuck a sock monkey in the cage at the end of the ride. I thought I would always notice the sock monkey. But when you start out early in the morning sometimes you don't see things like that. I finally figured it out from the funny looks I was ...


7

Get yourself two hose clamps that'll fit around the tube and some rubber strips to put under then so they don't scratch the paint up too badly. They'll hold a bottle cage on just fine. If you can see under the dirt and grime, that's exactly how the bottle cage in this picture is mounted: Edit: Here's another picture of a bottle cage mounted with hose ...


7

Unfortunately, I don't feel able to talk about food QUALITY, since even "vegan" can mean a lot of things these days, and this understanding varies from person to person. Just to illustrate, I'm not sure to suggest cheese, honey, milk and eggs, although I do find these to be excellent heavy-fuels for cycling. Now what I do feel sure to advise, being an ...


6

The core of this question seems to be the following: Where do you keep your water to optimize speed/agility/enjoyment? Disclaimer: I've never had a Camelbak, but I do drink water! Speed: If you mean speed of access, keeping water in a bladder is obviously the winner. If you're concerned with aerodynamics, I'd think the answer is a toss-up. ...


6

One of the recommendations for heavily training athletes now is to drink a fair amount of carbohydrate within an hour of finishing, in order to replenish glycogen stores in your muscle cells. Furthermore, the uptake is better in the presence of protein, so there are 'after ride' drink mixes you can spend more hard-earned $$$ on. My substitute: chocolate ...


6

50km isn't that enormous of a distance - and especially for someone who does 18km twice a day. It sounds like your current pace would have you completing that in about three hours. I'd bring a snack or two if you're worried about being peckish, but unless you're going all-out for a personal record or you skip breakfast you should have no issues. Just keep ...


6

A teaspoon of baking soda and warm water, is your best bet. No nasty after taste at all. Cheap and very effective.


6

It is extremely important that you eat and drink properly when cycling in extremes of temperature. In Dubai, where riding in the summer means riding regularly in 50c temperatures, this is a major problem. Eating is less of a concern than hydration, but you want to avoid dehydrators, like alcohol, in your food. You also want to watch what spices and ...


5

I have used old wine cask bags (or bladders, readily available in Australia, not too sure about rest of the world) packed either into a pannier or strapped onto the top of the rear rack (not the best position but I was fully loaded). Some would say the slight after taste of wine is a bonus. I have also seen unused bladders available from some camping ...


5

Mine stays on my bike all the time. After I clean/fill it, I put it back on my bike. I do run the risk of forgetting to fill it up, but the worst that's happened so far is that I've ended up with half a bottle of day old water. Which is much better than no water :)


5

When I'm on a cycling holiday I take a tube of cleaning tablets for false teeth with me. Insert a tablet, fill the bottle with water, let it soak overnight, rinse, done.


5

The tube has a lot of surface area and not a lot of volume, so it's going to lose heat quickly compared to the reservoir. In addition to insulating the tube mentioned by Glenn Gervais you can start with hot water in the reservoir and frequently drink a little bit to keep reheating the tube. This Nordic skiing article discusses this technique in more detail. ...


4

Judging by the price, this water bottle holder must be the best option.


4

Water is actually extremely dense, and heavier than people think; it can be difficult to carry. My solution is to carry water in four standard cycling water bottles. In addition to the two bottle cages on my touring bike's frame, I also purchased two plastic water bottle cages that fit on my front panniers: You can carry bottles of water in your panniers ...


4

I bike commute and do a lot other exercise, and have learned that it is indeed possible to eat too much before a ride. If I'm going to be biking early enough in the day, I'll usually just eat a very light snack, like a banana or a glass of smoothie or juice, and depending on the length of the ride, have a snack bar or juice box part way through the ride. ...


4

The Twofish Quick Cage has worked well for me. Not terribly pricey, and easy to reposition as needed. Not as secure as the hose clamp solution, however.


3

As much important as breakfast is the dinner the day before. My friends who practice cycling or triathlon eat plenty of pasta or rice at dinner before a competition.


3

Rather than boiling water get one of these filters from katadyn or MSR It won't remove all chemical poisons - but neither will boiling - it can remove some depending on how soluble they are. See Water filter use And unless you are drinking from chemical waste spills for weeks on end I wouldn't worry, if one area is high in arsenic the next won't be !



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible