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2

As @Batman has suggested brake fluid is hygroscopic. Over time moisture from the air is absorbed by the fluid. When the brakes get hot enough the absorbed water will boil. This results in air bubbles forming in the fluid. While brake fluid is not compressible the air bubbles are. This results in a mushy or spongy feeling to the brakes. Once cooled the ...


-2

Hydraulic brakes give better performance for the same size rotor, but mechanicals are good enough if you use a bigger rotor and set them up correctly. For example, I think Avid mechanical disc brakes are perfect, if you set them up correctly. If you run a 200mm rotor on the Avid mechanicals and use a good compressionless cable setup, one-finger, low-effort ...


2

Wrapping up all the comments, it appears that your brake mechanism applies okay, but doesn't achieve enough braking performance to slow you quickly. The likely cause is that you've never bedded in the brake pads. Apply the links in @Móż comment to bed your brakes in properly. If they're too naffed you might need new pads to start the bedding in process ...


0

In this situation a full brake flush & bleed is always best, but there is something you can try that may get you out of a bind. Orient the bike so that the reservoir is the highest and caliper the lowest, and such that the brake hose attachment on the caliper faces upward. The cable should also be inclined all the way with no dips along the way. Next, ...


0

The brake will only suck in air if air is already present in the reservoir. With some brakes this may not be a problem. With brakes where this is a problem, you could take the rather extreme step of closing the reservoir while immersed in brake fluid (after carefully turning and vibrating to release air bubbles). No, I haven't tried, and yes it would be a ...


2

I can't speak for every hydraulic brake ever, but when I've done this I didn't worry about it, I just bought sealed brakes and put them on. I'm currently running cheap Shimano ones on my touring bike and have not had any issues, and in the past I used Hayes with similar lack of problems. This bike I switched from cable to hydraulic after cooking the ...


5

Your brake is a closed system, and your brake cable is filled with a mixture of brake fluid and air. Air is compressible, while brake fluid isn't. So, the larger the proportion of air in the system, the more compressible it will be, the more effort is required to actually stop the bike, and this is frequently described as "spongier". Now, in your specific ...



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