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11

Like the other answers, disc brakes are the only way to go if you plan on your brakes getting wet at all. After riding disc brakes for a while now, I will never go back, even in good conditions. I would also really recommend hydraulic disc brakes over mechanical ones, especially in poor conditions. With hydraulic brakes, you don't have to pull as hard to get ...


8

ICEBIKE has a good page describing studded tires, including how to make your own. The basic process is as you describe: drive screws from the inside of the tire and cover them with something to protect the tube. Count the knobs and evenly spread out the 25 screws for each side. Punch holes, from the outside of the tire, into the designated ...


8

I find them useful on the street during the winter. Here in Minneapolis it gets pretty cold and the streets can get pretty icy. Their studded-ness plus their aggressive tread pattern give me good traction in snow and on ice. However, studded tires are really slow. The majority of the time, even in winter, there isn't much ice and I am completely fine riding ...


7

The bike doesn't matter that much, except when there's snow or ice on the roads. What you need most is the right clothing. It needs to be well-adapted to cycling (not loose or apt to get caught in the chain), layered so you can take off pieces BEFORE you get too warm, with wind-resistant and rain-resistant layers. Your shoes need to be somehow protected ...


6

Frequently lubing your components (especially your chain) is crucial in cold weather. Lube (which won't freeze) pushes out water (which does). Besides the protection against freezing, it also will help extend the life of your components even in the face of sand, salt, and gravel debris from cities deicing the roads. Fenders with mud flaps are useful as well, ...


4

Snow is some of the hardest stuff to bike through, and riding in eight inches of loose snow is either impossible or a real slog depending on what tire you use. Not to try to dissuade you, but I personally find riding through any more than a couple inches of snow to be more hassle than it's worth. For anything less than 2 inches, I don't think that the tire ...


3

Yaktrax and simila all increase the risk of a tangle. However, one must test with your specific shoes, cleats and pedals to see how high the risk of entanglement is. That risk must then be evaluated against the risk of slipping when dismounted. Another alternative is to use studded shoes. They are harder to use together with toe clips than normal shoes ...


3

Different tires for different conditions. For bare/wet roads I've been real happy with my Continental Grand Prix 4-Season with Vectran tires. With snow, it depends on the clearance through your brakes... On a typical road bike with standard brakes, you may not have enough room to add tires with traction. If you have a cyclocross bike or bike with V styled ...


3

My experience with riding 12 years through the winter in Toronto is that your bike is going to get ruined. Find a source for reasonable to cheap better mountain bikes and be ready to discard them after 2 or 3 winters at most. I found a couple of things helpful. Boots: Canadian Tire (sort of a car/tools/stuff store) sold these hunting boots that were ...


3

I actually have a schwinn traveler converted to single-speed as my beater. Although the tubing is heavy, it appears hold up marvelously against corrosion. That makes a very good beater. I'd make the schwinn your beater! Really, the only thing you might want for winter is fatter tires and fenders. I put 45mm tires on mine.


2

For the temperature range you're looking it, you're going to need reasonable, but not too over-the-top gear. Layers are the key, you'll get to grips with what works for you, but if you work with layers you can add and take away without too much trouble (particularly true if the morning and evening journeys are going to be different). Some good advice in ...


2

I live in South Central Wisconsin and have been commuting year round (on roads with there fair share of pot holes and such) for 3yrs now and have found a regular old commuter tire works just fine. I favor the Serfas City Drifter 26x1.5. As far as 700's go, if you wanna pony up a little more cash I hands down suggest the Schwalbe Marathon Dureme. I just ...


2

Your best bet for all around tire in the winter is going to be a cyclocross tire. They are made to race in grass, snow, on pavement, in sand, singletrack, and just about any way possible. They also have different types of treads for different conditions. You can't beat the Hutchinson Bulldogs, if you are looking for something more affordable, maybe the ...


2

I have 700x32 Marathon Plus tires: hoping that they are a good general-purpose commuting tire. They're said to be OK on rain. And riding during a snow storm (in Toronto) is analogous to riding in the rain: the tire goes through fresh-fallen snow to find the (wet) hard surface underneath. The manufacturer (Schwalbe) also make ice tires. They have studs, at ...


2

You can also create semi-studded tires by wrapping zip-ties around the tire, with the lock in the same position the screws are shown in the illustrated answer. You'd need a bike with disk brakes for this to work. So for a road bike it would probably be slightly less than practical.


1

It's kind of goofy and requires a bit of time to do, but you can zip tie your wheels to make snow wheels. While they aren't reusable if you remove them, it's a fairly cheap method. Here's a brief overview/guide. And then I went and found these too. They are supposed to work with all brake systems. As far as the socks go, I couldn't find anything smaller ...


1

Ice wax like in the linked post will most likely solve your problem. if not you can use WD-40. Put it on just before you go out but give it about 10-15 min to do its thing. Don't crank it around or anything just let it sit. What you want to happen is for the lubricating elements to make it hard for the ice to form, thats pretty much what the wax does too. ...


1

I built a set from baldies by driving screws through the knobs--advice on this is very common and I won't dwell on it here. I used mine all winter in the UP of Michigan (we get as much snow as Duluth and upstate NY). A few tips: Use hockey stick tape (NOT DUCT TAPE) as the first line of defense on top of screw heads inside the tire. The easiest way to do ...



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