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13

How big of a difference is there between them? The difference is this big... http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobmarley753/249120602/ Seriously though, after some research and asking friends, many who have aluminum rollers prefer them over PVC rollers The unasked question: Which one would you buy? Neither! Some of my friends have rollers that ...


9

Rollers are awesome! At least I think so. I have used both a trainer and rollers and I much prefer using the rollers. Once you are used to using the rollers you will be more than capable of doing things like watching a movie. One of the best things about rollers is they magnify issues with your cycling form. Once you have trained enough on the rollers your ...


6

Aluminum is more durable, but highly used PVC rollers have been seen to hit the decade mark so it's not really a big difference maker. The other difference would be that PVC rollers charge up static electricity and it can be annoying to get zapped every time you ride your rollers. Now it's up to you to see if that's worth an extra 90$. It's most likely ...


6

I can't recommend any specifics offhand, other than I've used two different types of Tacx trainers and have been very happy with them. Both were in the $150-$200 range new. A couple of comments though: a & b: Virtually any trainer on the market is going to be pretty stable unless you are out of the saddle and sprinting. As long as it's not a really low ...


5

how do you learn how to ride on rollers? Believe you can do it. Do it! Do it in a doorway. Practice How long does it take you to get the hang of it? Took me about 30 min. on a set of plastic parabolic rollers before I felt comfortable enough to take the rollers out of the doorway and just be next to a wall. are almost guaranteed to fall off ...


5

A nice advantage of the specialized stand is that it will keep your front wheel pointed front. So you won't have to expend energy keeping it that way. A brick or telephone directory (or anything that's just level and the right height) won't do that. A piece of wooden plank will, after you hack away at it with an axe a few times right in the middle. If ...


4

The Flow appears to be quite consistent though, depending on the mode in which it is used, it can be quite inaccurate. Below is a plot of reported power for speed on the Flow, with each line representing a different "scale factor." All of these data were collected at a coast down calibration of 0, with the same tire, at the same ambient room temperature; ...


4

The Tacx Power measurement is accurate in terms of consistency, meaning 200w on Sunday is 200w on Monday, as long as your trainer is set up consistently. It is generally showing a higher number than most other Power meters. My Powertap and my Fortius, when run concurrently differ by about 10%. As for long term accuracy, I've had my Fortius three years. I do ...


4

I'd agree that they can be pretty boring. I really focus my workouts when I'm using mine in the winter. Hard workouts are typically some type of interval set which takes about 1.5 hours. On days I would do a long ride and I'm stuck inside I get up early and do a 2 hour block then come back in the afternoon for the other 2 hour block. To combat the boring ...


4

The bike to use will depend on the reason for using the trainer. If your use of the trainer is for off season track training use the track bike, road racing use the triple,etc. If you just want some saddle time, the triple will simulate all of them to an extent, you can select the gearing of the track bike,the fixie or the single and leave it there.


4

My only cycle trainer experience is with the one I bought, an Elite Fluid Primo. It's a fluid trainer with a beefy stand, so less noisy than other types and the design is fairly simple. Just a matter of clamping the trainer onto the bike's rear axle and you're ready to go. As an apartment-dweller, I've got the whole thing setup on rubber tiles from Home ...


3

There are primarily two types of low-end consumer trainers: Magnetic Trainers and Fluid trainers: Mag Trainers - Uses Magnets to alter the resistance. Rider typically uses a handheld controller that is connected to the trainer to adjust the magnets/resistance while on the bike. Cheap trainers are typically Mag trainers. Fluid Trainers - Uses actual fluid ...


3

I cannot recommend a specific model, there are way too many products. I have a Cyclops Fluid trainer that is ok. I hate riding a trainer, it is too dang hot indoors for me. The tripod stands most trainers use look less stable than you would imagine, but they really can be quite stable. With a fluid trainer, the harder you ride, the harder the ...


2

I found the easiest way was to put the rollers in a door frame. Keep looking ahead and find a cadence where you only need slight pressure on the pedals. When you start too hard/easy will probably make you fall off. I found that I got the hang of rollers pretty quickly. One or two rides and they were easy and I didn't need the door frame to get going.


2

Convert it to a single speed and slam the seatpost. Those will be the biggest things. Add a bash guard up front too for when your rear wheel falls off the teeter-totters and skinnies. A shorter stem would be a good addition too. It'll improve the steering for those technical sections. You might also consider a rigid fork. Suspension isn't really ...


2

I agree with Mike - the first time I come off the rollers and hit the road I can definitely fell the difference in my form, particularly with my cadence. They're great as an adjunct to regular season cycling, too, since they really force you to concentrate on a smooth pedal form (if you're "pushing" the pedals as opposed to turning them you'll surge back and ...


1

There are sites such as The Sufferfest who do videos designed for trainers. I suspect there will be a bunch of these sites, you've probably found some already. Also, some of the turbo manufacturers (I'm thinking particularly of Tacx since I have personal experience here) release DVDs which can be used in conjunction with your trainer. Tacx do two types - ...


1

Assuming you already have a bike, have you looked into a trainer? Since you're not buying as much equipment, essentially just the resistance unit, you can get much better quality without spending as much. I got a CycleOps Fluid2 and it's pretty quiet, and also folds down pretty small which would probably be beneficial in an apartment. There's quite a wide ...


1

It depends. You've thrown out a few options. I'm a track cyclist, so I prefer the track bike on the rollers. However, that's mostly to work on form and comfort at high RPM's in my race position. That's the main benefit of rollers. For strength training and resistance, I used to use a mag or fluid trainer. I would do so with a road bike. The main benefit ...


1

I agree with the tips jimirings has stated, but if possible I would sell the Rockhopper and pick up a second hand jump bike - they're simpler bikes and park oriented ones rarely see the outdoors so tend to be in a better condition than their dirt brethren. The Rockhopper's geometry is wholly unsuitable for street/park riding, it's too tall, designed for ...


1

Focus your vision about 15-20 feet away. Don't look down at your front tire, or you will wobble more. One other step for beginners... do your first ride on the rollers with flat pedals and tennis shoes, rather than your clip-in pedals. Stop and hold onto the doorway when you get a drink of water. After you move out of the doorway, make sure there are ...


1

Getting used to rollers is similar in difficulty to driving a manual transmission car. The first day will be really tricky (especially the first hilarious 20 minutes). Soon, you get familiar with it enough that you can use the rollers without needing to occasionally grab something for stabilization as long as you have total concentration. Over time you ...



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