Hot answers tagged

14

How big of a difference is there between them? The difference is this big... http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobmarley753/249120602/ Seriously though, after some research and asking friends, many who have aluminum rollers prefer them over PVC rollers The unasked question: Which one would you buy? Neither! Some of my friends have rollers that ...


9

Rollers are awesome! At least I think so. I have used both a trainer and rollers and I much prefer using the rollers. Once you are used to using the rollers you will be more than capable of doing things like watching a movie. One of the best things about rollers is they magnify issues with your cycling form. Once you have trained enough on the rollers your ...


7

Try a Garden Centre, they usually sell a range of trays and they should have something suitable. An example would be this "Giant Plus Garden Tray" which at 120cm x 55cm should be big enough to place a bike on.


6

Aluminum is more durable, but highly used PVC rollers have been seen to hit the decade mark so it's not really a big difference maker. The other difference would be that PVC rollers charge up static electricity and it can be annoying to get zapped every time you ride your rollers. Now it's up to you to see if that's worth an extra 90$. It's most likely ...


6

I can't recommend any specifics offhand, other than I've used two different types of Tacx trainers and have been very happy with them. Both were in the $150-$200 range new. A couple of comments though: a & b: Virtually any trainer on the market is going to be pretty stable unless you are out of the saddle and sprinting. As long as it's not a really low ...


6

A nice advantage of the specialized stand is that it will keep your front wheel pointed front. So you won't have to expend energy keeping it that way. A brick or telephone directory (or anything that's just level and the right height) won't do that. A piece of wooden plank will, after you hack away at it with an axe a few times right in the middle. If ...


5

The Flow appears to be quite consistent though, depending on the mode in which it is used, it can be quite inaccurate. Below is a plot of reported power for speed on the Flow, with each line representing a different "scale factor." All of these data were collected at a coast down calibration of 0, with the same tire, at the same ambient room temperature; ...


5

how do you learn how to ride on rollers? Believe you can do it. Do it! Do it in a doorway. Practice How long does it take you to get the hang of it? Took me about 30 min. on a set of plastic parabolic rollers before I felt comfortable enough to take the rollers out of the doorway and just be next to a wall. are almost guaranteed to fall off ...


5

I'd agree that they can be pretty boring. I really focus my workouts when I'm using mine in the winter. Hard workouts are typically some type of interval set which takes about 1.5 hours. On days I would do a long ride and I'm stuck inside I get up early and do a 2 hour block then come back in the afternoon for the other 2 hour block. To combat the boring ...


5

That they are booooooooooooring and that you'll sweat a lot. Also, I'd buy specific tires such as this because they really eat the rubber.


5

My only cycle trainer experience is with the one I bought, an Elite Fluid Primo. It's a fluid trainer with a beefy stand, so less noisy than other types and the design is fairly simple. Just a matter of clamping the trainer onto the bike's rear axle and you're ready to go. As an apartment-dweller, I've got the whole thing setup on rubber tiles from Home ...


5

Based (very roughly) on this calculator here, I'll guess 28 km/h or less. Using a 0 weight rider and bike with no wind and 200 watt output you get roughly the speed you are getting on the trainer (the weights are used for rolling resistance). Leaving the power the same and changing to 80kgs, a 9kg bike and 15 km/h wind it gives 28 km/h which is a ...


4

Generally, not much. You need to look at the manufacturer's wheel size ratings and the hub widths allowed, along with the type of the axle (e.g. if you have a maxle, you'll need a special replacement maxle). If you're still not sure, contact the manufacturer. If you have a standard width hub (130 to 135 mm, which you have), and 26 or 700c wheels (which ...


4

The bike to use will depend on the reason for using the trainer. If your use of the trainer is for off season track training use the track bike, road racing use the triple,etc. If you just want some saddle time, the triple will simulate all of them to an extent, you can select the gearing of the track bike,the fixie or the single and leave it there.


4

The Tacx Power measurement is accurate in terms of consistency, meaning 200w on Sunday is 200w on Monday, as long as your trainer is set up consistently. It is generally showing a higher number than most other Power meters. My Powertap and my Fortius, when run concurrently differ by about 10%. As for long term accuracy, I've had my Fortius three years. I do ...


4

I use a few cardboard boxes taped together with gaffer's tape. The tape is waterproof. 2 layers of cardboard (staggered at edges if you're using small boxes) is plenty to make it through a season. Use the box edges up against a wall to prevent splatter. If you have uneven floors and the water rolls off of the boxes, fold an edge over to cause it to be ...


3

My trainer came with the appropriate front stand. However, I occasionally forget to use it and it really doesn't seem to matter either way. Since I have it, I try to remember to use it, but if I didn't have it, I wouldn't bother to buy one.


3

There are primarily two types of low-end consumer trainers: Magnetic Trainers and Fluid trainers: Mag Trainers - Uses Magnets to alter the resistance. Rider typically uses a handheld controller that is connected to the trainer to adjust the magnets/resistance while on the bike. Cheap trainers are typically Mag trainers. Fluid Trainers - Uses actual fluid ...


3

I cannot recommend a specific model, there are way too many products. I have a Cyclops Fluid trainer that is ok. I hate riding a trainer, it is too dang hot indoors for me. The tripod stands most trainers use look less stable than you would imagine, but they really can be quite stable. With a fluid trainer, the harder you ride, the harder the ...


3

I too agree that they're really boring. Have you considered rollers? They take a little to get used to, but they're less boring (because you have to balance) and really good for developing smooth pedalling technique. They also don't seem to wear out tires as quickly.


3

I agree with Mike - the first time I come off the rollers and hit the road I can definitely fell the difference in my form, particularly with my cadence. They're great as an adjunct to regular season cycling, too, since they really force you to concentrate on a smooth pedal form (if you're "pushing" the pedals as opposed to turning them you'll surge back and ...


3

Your bike would like the same conditions as you yourself would like - room temperature air and humidity. Also bikes dislike being left salted - if your location salts the roads then rinsing this off after your ride is an excellent idea to preserve If space is an issue, there are several solutions for small spaces. If you have space up high then there are ...


2

Getting used to rollers is similar in difficulty to driving a manual transmission car. The first day will be really tricky (especially the first hilarious 20 minutes). Soon, you get familiar with it enough that you can use the rollers without needing to occasionally grab something for stabilization as long as you have total concentration. Over time you ...


2

I found the easiest way was to put the rollers in a door frame. Keep looking ahead and find a cadence where you only need slight pressure on the pedals. When you start too hard/easy will probably make you fall off. I found that I got the hang of rollers pretty quickly. One or two rides and they were easy and I didn't need the door frame to get going.


2

Convert it to a single speed and slam the seatpost. Those will be the biggest things. Add a bash guard up front too for when your rear wheel falls off the teeter-totters and skinnies. A shorter stem would be a good addition too. It'll improve the steering for those technical sections. You might also consider a rigid fork. Suspension isn't really ...


2

On the cheaper side, a tarp or a vinyl tablecloth should do the trick, and be more easily tidied away and stored. Even a decent-weight shower curtain!


2

Most modern bicycle components will withstand an amazing amount of variation. I do, however, recommend that you allow time for the bike to dry in between taking it out and keep the bike as free as possible from salt and grime (which will accelerate wear of your components). As background, I have had several commuter bikes that regularly go between a 70F ...


2

It's not the temperature changes that cause rust, but humidity, especially in combination with salt. Let the bike dry completely whenever possible. I store my steel bike indoors both at work and at home (in unheated but above zero garages), and try to avoid salted roads (which is not always possible). It easily survives the winter. It also depends on the ...


1

My grandparents used to cover their entry way carpets with a vinyl carpet protector in the winter. The nice thing about this is that you can roll it up for storage when you aren't using it.


1

There are sites such as The Sufferfest who do videos designed for trainers. I suspect there will be a bunch of these sites, you've probably found some already. Also, some of the turbo manufacturers (I'm thinking particularly of Tacx since I have personal experience here) release DVDs which can be used in conjunction with your trainer. Tacx do two types - ...



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