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39

Advantages: Fast - generally these fill up your tire much faster than you could with a pump Less effort - hook up, push button, no pumping Possibly less weight (but I haven't compared weight of smallest pumps to CO2) Lower initial investment - a valve and 2 cartridges generally seems to be cheaper than a good small pump. Disadvantages: Consumable ...


25

I'm surprised nobody else has mentioned this. Probably the most legitimate purpose of CO2 inflators for bicycles is for inflating tubeless tires. If you need to replace or repair a tubeless tire, chances are you will have zero luck inflating the tire if you try to use a hand pump. You either need to use an air compressor (good luck carrying that with you on ...


14

This is a debate that gets picked up on every bicycle forum known to man (okay, that might have been exaggerating a bit). Typically you start to ask the question when you notice that the morning after you have used your CO2 cartridge, your tyre is ridiculously low. By no means am I a chemist but, as it has been explained to me, CO2 and butyl are more ...


14

Disadvantage: Environmentally irresponsible. It seems to me that there is a lot of energy contained within, and required to make, that CO2 cartridge for a single tyre inflation. I do carry one for emergencies 'in case of pump failure' but I try my best to never use it out of laziness.


14

The ideal gas law (which is a good approximation in this case) says PV=nRT where P is pressure, V is volume, n is mols of gas, R is the ideal gas law constant, and T is temperature in Kelvin. Thus, solving for n, we see n = (PV)/(RT). Then, assuming air is made up of {gas1, gas2,...} with fractions {p1,p2,...} (so p1+p2+...=1) and corresponding molar ...


12

Bike shops advertise them because they're consumable items. Every time you use a cartridge the shop is likely to make another sale. Whereas a good pump should last through many, many flats and is less likely to get good placement in the shop. For advantages/disadvantages, see freiheit's answer.


12

Note: this calculation makes many assumptions, so it's only useful in an 'average use case', not some sort of exact measurement. If you find better information, please post it and I'll update the answer. How many pumps you would need to fill up a tire depends on many variables. First, the volume of your inner tube, which can be approximated as a torus ...


10

Those valve stems are too short for those deep deep rims you've got on there. You can tell just from the photos that the valve stem isn't sticking out far enough from the rim for the pump to fit all the way on it. Hence, it's not contacting the valve enough for you to inflate your tires.


10

Most likely this is a result of riding the tire while the pressure is too low. When you do that the tube tends to slide around in the tire and can get cut against the edge of the rim. However, this could also be the result of using a hand pump, which, if you don't "buck" it against something or hold the head steady will move the stem back and forth rather ...


10

It sounds like your pump is not on the valve properly, so instead of inflating the tire you're just pressurizing the inside of your pump. Does your bike have Schrader valves (the kind you see on a car) or Presta valves (skinnier, with a kind of pointy top)? If it has Presta valves, make sure the top of the valve is unscrewed. There's a little nut that you ...


8

Don't bother with an air compressor. Get a proper bike pump. They are cheaper, and will fill a tire to 60 psi with minimal effort. A good bike pump will also require less maintenance. Also it'll only take a couple pumps to top up your tires. Much less time than to drag out a big air compressor. Have you had problems with standard floor/track pumps? What ...


7

It is for adjusting the suspension on a medium to high-end mountain bike (fork), hence the lack of 'Presta' option. Since you will be returning it, to keep the shop happy and get what you really need, consider getting: A track pump with gauge and aluminium body. Look for one with a well engineered head that does Presta and Shrader valves. The easiest ones ...


6

You're really asking two questions here: 1) Do road tires lose air more quickly? And 2) Do tubeless tires lose air more quickly? First off, let's talk about the different ways that tires can (and do) lose pressure. Obviously, they can lose pressure through a poor seal, either on the valve or where the tire seats to the rim on tubeless tires. Tires also ...


6

To calculate the weight of a gas you need the volume, pressure and temperature. A bike tyre is a torus (doughnut) with volume given by the formula: V=(πr^2)(2πR) where R is the radius of the wheel and r is the radius of the tyre. For a 700c25 tyre, R will be 311mm and r will be 12.5mm that gives a volume of 9.59×10^5 cubic millimetres or 0.000959 cubic ...


5

A shock pump is designed to fill a very small volume of space with very high air pressures. A tire pump is designed to fill a large volume of air, to relatively low pressures, pretty quickly. You can technically fill a schrader valve tube using a shock pump, but because the volume of air for each repetition of the pump will be so low, it might take a week ...


5

The liters/minute capacity of a compressor says nothing about it's max pressure. Most compressors intended for air tool use are good to about 100psi, maybe 120, but you need to make sure before you spend your money -- the compressor needs to do maybe 30% higher pressure than your "target" pressure, or you'll be forever waiting for the tires to fill. But as ...


5

The CO2 inflater is, for me, only an emergency option. It lives in my saddle bag to get me home after a flat. I haven't rigorously investigated it, but anecdotally I think that tyres inflated with CO2 deflate by themselves more quickly than air-inflated tyres do. Fortunately I haven't punctured too much recently, but the last couple of roadside fixes with ...


4

The main benefit that I get from using a CO2 inflater over using a pump is time savings. The CO2 will fill your tire with air faster than a pump. I always carry a pump in addition to a CO2 inflater because the pump provides unlimited air. It's a good idea to be prepared to handle at least 2 flats so the pump is a nice backup. I would consider just ...


4

The air we breathe is made up of 78% nitrogen (N2) and 21% oxygen (O2), with trace gases making up the rest. So the easiest comparison is between N2 and CO2. N2 is less dense than CO2 but otherwise they're very similar (to your tires) unless you somehow find yourself riding in temperatures near their liquidation points -- in which case you have bigger ...


3

I can't see your specific rims from here, but plenty of bikes back in the 70s and 80s had rims that width capable of handling 90-110 PSI. And I definitely wouldn't run a 1-1/8" tire at 65 PSI. I'd imagine that the rims, if designed for tires that narrow, should be able to handle 80 PSI or so.


3

This could be caused by a tube that was installed with the valve not perpendicular to the rim. It's quite a common problem, and I don't believe that a patch will work because they're designed to work on flat rubber.


3

That pump does not appear to be intended for use with tires. Return it and buy an appropriate pump.


3

I really like using the co2 canisters cause the're quick to pump up. Particularly for road bike, you can't get a road bike to 110psi using a hand pump. Most I've got is around 40psi with a hand pump. That pressure will let you limp home but certainly you can't continue on your merry ride with that pressue for fear of a low pressure flat. I've also now ...


3

That appears to be a standard flip-up chuck, and it claims to be "universal". If using on a Schrader valve you just push it on and flip up the lever. If using on a Presta valve you unscrew the knob on the Presta valve first, then push on and flip up the lever. With some of these you need to not push the chuck quite all the way on if using on Schrader. ...


3

Road tires have higher pressure with lower volume, and both of those properties are going to cause them to lose air more quickly than a lower pressure, higher volume tire, tubeless or not. With that in mind, it may be the case that the tire needs a little more sealant. The stuff has to squeeze around not only throughout the casing of the tire, but also ...


3

According to the people at Scott, the general weight limit for a rider is 110 kg. You are significantly above this, so the manufacturer doesn't necessarily support you on that. The wheels durability depends a lot on who built them and how well they were built and if they have taken any damage. You are in a YMMV (and at your own risk) range by sticking with ...


3

The visible strip sticking out from the top of the rim and inside the line is in fact the Chafer strip. This is on the tire to prevent the bead hook on the rim from cutting into the tire. The bead is the wire or in the case of folding tire such as the x'plor ush Kevlar ring on the edge of each tire. When seating the tire the bead is place inside the bead ...


3

Based on your edit, do this. Remove the wheel, deflate to about 10 PSI, then roll it along the ground, pressing down hard, for several revolutions. After you've done this examine the strip. Anywhere where the strip is not showing the "average" amount, tug on the tire to pull it out. Anywhere where the strip is showing too much, first examine the opposite ...


2

That depends... I usually carry inflaters AND a pump. I've had problems with both. The CO2 cartridges aren't too crazy expensive, but my most recent flat I used 2 of them and still ended up finishing with the pump. It's really easy to blow the CO2 out without getting it in the tire, and if that happens, you'd better have another cartridge to try, or a ...


2

Yep, it appears to be what it says (though not very clearly) -- a "shock pump", intended for pumping up shocks in bike suspensions, not for pumping up tires. And, frankly, I've never seen a "mini" pump that could do even a halfway decent job of pumping up high pressure tires. You need a full-sized frame pump to do it reasonably well.



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